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College Bulletin 1980-1981 





Bethany 
College 

Bulletin 
1980-1981 



Vol. LXXIII No. 4 
August 1980 
(USPS 052-420) 

Second class postage paid at Bethany, 
West Virginia, 26032. Published five 
times a year, February, April, July, 
August and October, by Bethany 
College, Bethany, West Virginia. 



Notice of Nondiscriminatory Policy 

Bethany College admits students of any 
race, color, sex, religion, handicaps, 
and national or ethnic origin to all of 
the rights, privileges, programs, and 
activities generally accorded or made 
available to students at the school. 
Bethany does not discriminate on the 
basis of race, color, sex, religion, and 
national or ethnic origin in the 
administration of its educational 
policies, admissions policies, 
scholarship and loan programs, athletic 
activities, or other school- administered 
programs. 



College 

Calendar 

1980-81 

First Semester 

August 31-September 

1 Sunday-Monday 

Orientation and Evaluation for new 
students 

2 Tuesday 

Registration 

3 Wednesday 

Classes begin for all students 

9 Tuesday 

Last day for re-adjustment of schedules 
without academic and financial penalty; 
last day to add a course 

11 Thursday 

Formal Convocation 

16 Tuesday 

Last day of credit/no credit 

October 

4 Saturday 

Homecoming 

21 Tuesday 

Last day of classes for first half of 
semester 

21-22 Tuesday-Wednesday 

Final exam nights for first half 
semester courses 

24 Friday 

Mid-term grades are due 

25 Saturday 

Parent's day 

November 

3 Monday 

Writing Qualification Test for 
Freshman Seminars 



8 Saturday 

Board of Trustees' meeting 

17-21 Monday-Friday 

Registration for second semester 

21 Friday 5 pm 

Thanksgiving vacation begins 

December 

1 Monday 8 am 

Thanksgiving vacation ends 

16 Tuesday 

Last day of first semester classes 

17 Wednesday 

Reading Day 

18-20 Thursday-Saturday 

Final Exam Period 

29 Monday 

Final grades are due 

January Term (January 5-30) 
January 

26-27 Monday-Tuesday 

Senior Comprehensive Exams (Written) 

28-31 Wednesday-Saturday 

Senior Comprehensive Exams (Oral) 

Second Semester 

February 

1 Sunday 

Registration for all students and 
Diagnostic Writing Test for all new 
students 

2 Monday 

Classes begin for all students 

6 Friday 

Last day for re-adjustment of schedules 
without academic and financial penalty; 
last day to add a course 

12 Thursday 

Formal Convocation 

13 Friday 

Last day for credit/no credit 

March 

5 Thursday 

Founder's Day 

18-19 Wednesday-Thursday 

Final Exam nights for first half 
semester courses 



20 Friday 

Last day of classes for first half of 
semester 

20 Friday 4 pm 

Spring Vacation begins 

23 Monday 

Mid-term grades are due 

30 Monday 8 am 

Spring Vacation ends 

April 

2 Thursday 

Writing Qualification Tests 
(Sophomores and Juniors) 

9 Thursday 

Honors day 

13-17 Monday-Friday 

Registration for first semester 1981-82 

May 

2 Saturday 8 am 

Reading period for seniors 

4 Monday 

Grades are due for seniors taking 
comps 

11-12 Monday-Tuesday 

Senior Comprehensive Exams (Written) 

13-16 Wednesday-Saturday 

Senior Comprehensive Exams (Oral) 

15 Friday 

Grades due for seniors who took comps 
in January 

15 Friday 

Last day of second semester classes 

16 Saturday 

Alumni Day 

18-22 Monday-Friday 

Final Exam Period (use as many days 
as necessary) 

21 Thursday 1 pm 

Final Faculty meeting 

22 Friday 

Board of Trustees' meeting 

22 Friday 8 pm 

Baccalaureate 

23 Saturday 10 am 

Commencement 

25 Monday 

Final grades are due 




Tkble of 
Contents 



Bethany Profile 


5 


College Life 


13 


Admission 


25 


Expenses and Financial Aid 


29 


Academic Program 


39 


Course Descriptions 


51 


The Directories 


123 


Index 


127 



MICHIGAN 



. MUSKEGON 




Bethany 
Profile 

History 

Bethany was established as a private 
educational foundation, chartered 
under the laws of then undivided 
Commonwealth of Virginia on March 2, 
1840, more than two decades before 
West Virginia became a state. The 
charter was written by Alexander 
Campbell, a celebrated debater, 
Christian reformer, and educator, who 
not only provided land for the campus 
and $15,000 toward the first building, 
but also served as Bethany's first 
president until his death in 1866. 

Bethany's traditions are derived from 
the University of Glasgow in Scotland, 
where Campbell studied before coming 
to America in 1809, and from the 
University of Virginia, from which 
Campbell gleaned much of the College's 
original curriculum and faculty. 

Since its inception, Bethany has 
remained a four-year private college 
affiliated with the Christian Church 
(Disciples of Christ). This religious 
body, of which Campbell was one of the 
principal founders, continues to support 
and encourage Bethany, but it exercises 
no sectarian control. 




Location 



Bethany is located in the northern 
panhandle of West Virginia, a narrow 
tip of land between Ohio and 
Pennsylvania. This special location in 
the rolling foothills of the Allegheny 
Mountains puts Bethany near several 
large cities. To the northeast, just 50 
miles away, is the major urban and 
cultural center of Pittsburgh. Fifteen 
miles to the southwest is Wheeling, W. 
Va., the dominant northern city in the 
state and location of Oglebay Park, one 
of the nation's best-known summer and 
winter resorts. 



Accreditation and 
Memberships 

• North Central Association of 
Colleges and Secondary Schools 

• Association of American Colleges 

• American Council on Education 

• College Entrance Examination 
Board 

• American Association of Colleges for 
Teacher Education 

• National Council for the 
Accreditation of Teacher Education 

• National Association of Independent 
Colleges and Universities 

• Division of Higher Education of the 
Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) 

• Women graduates are eligible for 
membership in the American 
Association of University Women. 



Enrollment 



Each year Bethany students - 
approximately 500 men and 400 women 
- represent some 29 states and 16 
foreign countries. The majority come 
from Pennsylvania, New Jersey, New 
York, Ohio, Connecticut, Maryland, and 
West Virginia. Nearly 85 per cent of the 
student body is from out-of-state. 




Curriculum 



In December 1971 a new curriculum 
was adopted for Bethany students. 
Called the Bethany Plan, it provides not 
only for a classroom-based program but 
for an experience-based program as 
well. It is a recognition that the 
classroom is not the only place for 
meaningful education. 

The Plan provides for a close student- 
faculty relationship. In consultation 
with a faculty advisor, the student is 
asked to design or to help plan an 
educational program to satisfy his or 
her personal goals. It encourages 
students to develop their own special 
course of study. Pages 39-49 discuss 
this curriculum in detail. 



Goals 



Bethany College is a private, four-year, 
church-related but autonomous, co- 
educational, residential, liberal arts 
college with a tradition of an innovative 
and quality educational program which 
emphasizes critical reason and the 
religious dimension of life, community 
experience and the importance of the 
individual, ethical responsibility and the 
satisfactions of personal 
accomplishments, the integration of the 
total person, and the value of a life of 
work and service to others. 

The educational program is designed to 
help each Bethany student realize seven 
goals: 

1) to discover how to acquire, evaluate, 
and use knowledge 

2) to master the skills of communication 

3) to cooperate and collaborate with 
others in study, analysis, and 
formulation of solutions to problems 

4) to understand contemporary issues 
and events 

5) to analyze personal values, to 
perceive and to deal sympathetically 
with the values of others, and to be 
open to the continued evaluation of both 

6) to make progress toward the 
selection of and the preparation for a 
vocation 

7) to integrate the varied experiences of 
life and to see the relationship of the 
college experience to future 
development as a responsible citizen. 



Educational 
Resources 

Substantial resources are invested in 
the education of Bethany students. The 
gross assets of the College on June 30, 
1979, totaled $31,232,234. Facilities and 
equipment at book value were 
$17,551,244, with a replacement value 
of approximately $44,000,000. The 
market value of all endowment funds 
was $11,757,248. 

More than 30 academic, administrative, 
and residential buildings are on 
Bethany's campus. 

Pendleton Heights (1841) was built 
during the college's first year by W. K. 
Pendleton, a member of the first faculty 
and second president of the College. 
Today it serves as home for Bethany's 
president. Pendleton Heights is listed in 
the "National Register of Historic 
Places." 

Old Main (1858) is the central unit of 
Bethany's academic buildings. Its tower 
dominates the campus and is the chief 
architectural feature noted as one 
approaches the College. Old Main is 
listed in the "National Register of 
Historic Places." The building is one of 
the earliest examples of collegiate 
Gothic architecture in the United 
States, and is in the process of 
restoration. 

Commencement Hall (1872) provides 
the setting for convocations, concerts, 
lectures, dramatic presentations, and 
other gatherings. Studios and 



classrooms for the art department 
occupy the ground floor of the building. 
It was remodeled in 1924. 

Cramblet Hall (1905) was constructed 
through a gift from Andrew Carnegie. 
Originally the library, it was remodeled 
in 1961 to house Bethany's 
administrative offices. It is named in 
honor of two presidents of the College, 
Thomas E. Cramblet and his son, 
Wilbur. 

Cochran Hall (1910) was built as a 
men's residence by Mark M. Cochran of 
the class of 1875. The interior of the 
building was completely remodeled 
during 1974-75 to serve as a faculty 
office and student conference center. 
Today it houses eight academic 
departments of the College and several 
administrative offices. 

Oglebay Hall (1912) a gift of Earl W. 
Oglebay of the class of 1869, 
accommodates the laboratories and 
classrooms for the biology and 
psychology departments. 

Irvin Gymnasium (1919) a gift of the 
Irvin family of Big Run, Pa., serves as a 
recreation center for the campus. It 
contains a modern dance studio. 

Renner Union-Bethany House (1948) is 
the student union. Here are found the 
campus radio station, the college 
bookstore, a student photographic 
darkroom, music listening rooms, a 
spacious lounge, and the Admission 
Office. The alumni joined in 1969 with 
the R. R. Renner family of Cleveland, 
Ohio, to remodel this facility. 



Alumni Field House (1948) provides 
physical education facilities for men and 
women. It is also used for concerts. 
Adjacent to the field house are football 
and baseball fields, tennis courts, and a 
quarter-mile track. 

Richardson Hall of Science (1964) 
provides facilities for the chemistry, 
physics, and mathematics departments 
and houses the computer center. It is 
named for Robert Richardson, 
Bethany's first science professor. 

John J. Knight Natatorium (1967) 
contains a six-lane, 25-yard, heated pool 
which is used in the physical education 
program and for intercollegiate 
competition. It is named for John J. 
Knight, long-time director of athletics. 
Four tennis courts are located next to 
the natatorium. 




David and Irene Steinman Fine Arts 
Center (1969) houses the education, 
music, and theatre departments. A 
fully-equipped theatre occupies the 
central portion of the building. The 
music department consists of teaching 
studios, studio-classrooms, a general 
rehearsal room for the larger choral 
and instrumental groups, and individual 
practice rooms. 

Leadership Center (1972) is the world's 
first solarized satellite receiving center 
and houses offices, seminar rooms, 
exhibition areas, and a 123-seat circular 
conference room for continuing 
education activities. The center offers a 
regular series of conferences, seminars, 
and workshops for education, business, 
and professional groups. It is a 
memorial to Thomas E. Millsop, former 
president and chairman of the National 
Steel Corporation. 

Gresham House (1972) is the Millsop 
Center's adjoining guest facility which 
provides 40 rooms for overnight 
accommodations for visitors to the 
College. It is named for Dr. Perry E. 
Gresham, Bethany's twelfth president, 
and his wife, Aleece. 



Benedum Commons (1969) is the 
modern, air-conditioned dining facility 
for all Bethany students. In addition to 
the main dining room, the building 
houses a snack bar, lounge facilities and 
several small dining rooms for special 
student and faculty events. 



Bethany 



1. Pendleton Heights 

2. Old Main 

3. Commencement Hall 

4. Oglebay Hall 

5. Steinman Fine Arts Center 
Wailes Theater 

6. Irvin Gymnasium 

7. Richardson Hall of Science 
Weimer Lecture Hall 

8. Phillips Memorial Library 

9. Morlan Hall 

10. Harlan Hall 

11. Phillips Hall 
Renner Too 
Maxwell's 

12. Cramblet Hall 

13. Cochran Hall 

14. Benedum Commons 

15. Bethany House-Renner Union 
Bookstore 
Admission Office 

16. Infirmary 

17. McEachern Hall 

18. McLean Hall 

19. Bethany Memorial Church 

20. Campbell Hall 

21. Buildings & Grounds 

22. Heating Plant 

23. Knight Natatorium 

24. Alumni Field House 

25. Rine Field 

26. Gresham House 

27. Leadership Center 

28. Highland Hearth 

29. Faculty Apartments 

30. Clark House Uta) 

31. Hagerman House (*kt| 

32. McDiarmid House (riB*| 

33. Goodnight House (zaf| 

34. Woolery House 

35. Zeta Tau Alpha 

36. Sigma Alpha Epsilon 

37. Alpha Xi Delta 

38. Independent House 

39. Kappa Delta 

40. Phi Mu 

41. Weimer Nature Trail 

42. Amphitheater 

43. Oglebay Gates 




8 










Residence Halls 

Harlan, Morlan, Phillips, and Campbell 
are the largest residence halls on the 
Bethany campus. Since 1966, Bethany 
has moved toward small, self-governing 
living units, each accommodating either 
32 or 48 students and containing social 
and recreational facilities. Phillips Hall, 
one of two freshmen women residences 
and the oldest residence hall (1890) on 
campus, was remodeled in early 1978. 
The ground floor now houses a large, 
multipurpose recreation room, Renner 
Too, Maxwell's Coffee House and 
kitchen facilities. In addition, all 
students' rooms have been redecorated 
and the heating system, fire safety and 
access for the handicapped have been 
improved. 

In the early 1970's, six 32-bed residence 
units were constructed on the wooded 
north slope of the campus. These units 
house fraternities, sororities, and 
independent men. 



Phillips Memorial 
Library 

The T. W. Phillips Memorial Library, 
built in 1959, is a gift of the Phillips 
family of Butler, Pa., as a memorial to 
T. W. Phillips, Sr. and T. W. Phillips, Jr., 
leading laymen of the Christian Church, 
trustees of the college, and generous 
philanthropists. 

Open 95 hours a week, the staff of 
librarians and clerks, assisted by more 
than 60 student assistants, is eager to 
help students and faculty find the 
information they need in the library's 
quality collections. 

The building contains nearly 140,000 
volumes of books and bound periodicals 
with additional collections of 
microforms, pamphlet files, selected 
government documents, and circulating 
art prints. The library's periodical 
holdings number 698, of which 587 are 
currently received. Local, area, 
national, and foreign newspapers arrive 
daily. 

The librarians and faculty select 
materials that provide students with 
the information needed to complete any 
course assignment in the subject areas 
taught. Many alumni and friends of the 
College have given book collections and 
provided financial support that has 
enhanced the quality of the holdings. 

For advanced research and senior 
projects, the library, through its 
membership in the Pittsburgh Regional 
Library Center and the OCLC 
nationwide computerized network, 
provides Bethany students and faculty 
with interlibrary loan access to the 
collections of more than 1,500 college, 
university, public, and special libraries. 
The library provides weekend van 
service to libraries in Pittsburgh. 

The Campbell Room contains books, 
periodicals, letters, paintings, 
photographs, and museum pieces 
related to Bethany's founder and first 
president, Alexander Campbell, his 
Bethany associates, and his family. The 



College archives collection spans the 
history of the institution from its 
beginnings to yesterday's events. Both 
collections are significant resources not 
only for the history of the College and 
religious movement that Campbell 
began here but also for regional and 
intellectual history of the nineteenth 
century. 

Media Center 

The Media Center, located in the 
library, provides such instructional 
media materials as slides, audio and 
video tapes, cassettes, video discs, 
films, filmstrips, and recordings. A full 
array of the latest media equipment is 
available for students and faculty to use 
these media materials or to create their 
own productions. 

A media laboratory in the center 
provides language learning consoles, 
calculators, cable television, stereo 
record players, and other self- 
instructional media learning modules. 

Faculty or students can check out 
media materials or equipment for 
instructional use. The center also has 
production facilities for slides, tapes, 
filmstrips, transparencies, dry 
mounting, laminating, and high speed 
tape duplication. 

Close coordination between the media 
center and other media-oriented units 
on campus, such as WVBC radio, TV-3 
television, biology auto-tutorial 
laboratory, campus duplicating services, 
and the Appalachian Community 
Service Network, make it possible to 
meet any media need of the Bethany 
College community. 



10 



College Life 



At Bethany, education is a total 
experience of living and learning. The 
College community offers a myriad of 
activities from hang gliding to campus 
theatre productions. Students are 
encouraged to participate in those 
things that will best compliment their 
educational experience. 

Bethany assumes the mature and 
responsible citizenship of its students. 
The College believes this citizenship is 
best realized through the personal 
freedom of each individual, as well as 
the community building efforts of 
students, faculty and administrators. 
College officials intervene only when 
the rights and privileges of some are 
threatened by the actions of others. 

Through this community interaction, 
there is such a sense of ownership by 
both those who learn and those who 
teach that the term "Bethanian" has 
come to mean a special sense of pride. 

Student Government 

The Student Board of Governors, with 
representatives from all residence 
groups, manages a substantial budget 
and appropriates funds for many 
diverse student activities. 
Representatives are appointed to many 
faculty committees including those 
concerned with curricula, cultural 
programs, schedules, athletics, religious 
life, international education, and the 
library. In addition, the Student Board 
of Governors President participates in 
the biannual Board of Trustees meeting 
as a non- voting member. 




Residence halls form the primary 
political groups for self-government. 
Fraternities, sororities, and house 
associations accommodate all 
upperclassmen in small self -governed 
units. These students are responsible 
for their conduct; cultural, academic, 
and social programming, and care of 
the facilities. Shortly after arrival, 
freshmen also organize and send 
representatives to student government. 

Student 
Regulations 

A complete description of the 
regulations pertaining to housing, 
telephones, dining rooms, health 
services, motor vehicles, use of alcoholic 
beverages and drugs, eligibility 
requirements, and other areas of 
student life is contained in the Student 
Handbook. However, applicants for 
admission should know the following in 
advance: 

1) With the exception of commuters 
(i.e., married students or students living 
with parents) all students are required 
to live in College residence halls or 
fraternity or sorority houses unless 
excused by the Dean of Students. 



2) All students, except commuters, are 
required to board in the College dining 
hall unless excused by the Dean of 
Students. No refunds are granted for 
meals missed. 

3) Freshmen are not permitted to bring 
automobiles to Bethany unless the 
request is approved by the Dean of 
Students and the vehicle properly 
registered. 

4) Violations of regulations which are 
not adequately dealt with by the self- 
governing housing unit may be referred 
to the Dean of Students or to the 
Student Court. The Student Court is 
composed entirely of students and 
offers students the opportunity to be 
judged by their peers. 

Residence Life 

The majority of Bethany residences are 
small, self-governed living units, 
including 11 home-like, 32-bed or 48-bed 
houses on the wooded slopes opposite 
the main campus. In all, 21 housing 
units are available to students. 

Fraternities, sororities, and 
independent-house associations 
constitute the primary upperclass social 
groups on campus. Each association or 
fraternal group is responsible for 
arranging its cultural, recreational, and 
social experiences and for maintaining 
its own internal discipline. Houses are 
also responsible for organizing day-to- 
day housekeeping chores and for 
working closely with the College in 
developing a decor that suits the group 
living style. 



13 



Freshmen live in the larger residence 
halls, but are granted many of the same 
freedoms and responsibilities of the 
upperclassmen. Head residents and 
student resident assistants give a great 
deal of leadership and counsel the first 
semester, and by the second semester 
freshmen are involved in most decision- 
making. 

The seven fraternities and five 
sororities at Bethany are nationally 
affiliated and constitute approximately 
60 percent of the student body. 
Interfraternity Council and Panhellenic 
Council, composed of representatives 
from each of the fraternities and 
sororities, act as the coordinating 
agencies in fraternal affairs and 
activities. 

The fraternities represented are Alpha 
Sigma Phi, Beta Theta Pi, Delta Tau 



S ' nli he 

SSftSSS 

nil. puns «ere completed to tit 
restoration of this ttroctim u 
its original condrtloa 



Delta, Kappa Alpha, Sigma Alpha 
Epsilon, Phi Kappa Tau, and Sigma Nu. 
The sororities are Alpha Xi Delta, 
Kappa Delta, Pi Beta Phi, Phi Mu, and 
Zeta Tau Alpha. 




Social Life 



Much of the social life at Bethany is 
casual. It may be a coffee date or 
Thursday Cabaret Night at the Barn or 
a mid-week sporting event. Any night 
of the week friends can be found 
studying together at the library or in a 
residence hall lounge. Athletics, 
theatre, movies, concerts, coffee-house 
programs, and parties fill many 
weekends. 

The student-run College Union 
Program Board brings numerous big- 
name concerts to campus. In recent 
years, the Lester Lanin Orchestra has 
played for Homecoming while other 
concerts were given by Gene Cotton, 
Maynard Ferguson (workshop and 
concert), Jay Ferguson, Michael 
Iceberg and the Iceberg Machine 
(electronic music), The Dirt Band, The 
David Bromberg Band, Livingston 
Taylor, Jonathan Edwards, Pure Prairie 
League, The Michael Stanley Band, 
Michael Johnson and others. 

Some of the other entertainers to 
appear at Maxwell's Coffee House were 
Debby McClatchey, Devilish Mary, 
Trapezoid and the Green Grass 
Cloggers, Bob White, Andy Cohen, 
Delaware Water Gap, Sparky Rucker, 
Wendy Grossman, Critton Hollow and 
others. 

Volunteers in 
Action 

Volunteers in Action is a student- 
initiated and student-run organization 
providing various community services 
by Bethany College students. At the 
same time, VIA gives Bethanians the 
opportunity for practical experience in 
some of the helping professions. Not 
only is it a means of fulfilling practicum 
requirements, but VIA offers on and off 
campus activities to help others along 



with helping the students themselves 
develop group skills and a sense of 
personal satisfaction. 

The different volunteer programs work 
with a diversity of ages and resources. 
These include experience with 
teenagers in a juvenile detention center; 
playing and tutoring with rural children 
in the Saturday School program; 
engaging in a one-to-one relationship 
with children and teens as a Big 
Brother or Big Sister. Other programs 
involve helping with the elderly of the 
Bethany community, visiting and 
working in a rehabilitation and 
extended-care hospital; and visiting 
with individuals at a nearby mental 
health center. 

As the largest student organization on 
campus, Volunteers in Action hopes to 
generate concern and compassion 
throughout the community while 
enhancing practical learning 
experience. 

Cultural Activities 

Speakers on campus within the past 
two years were James J. Mapes, 
hypnotist; LeRoy Neiman, sports artist; 
Roy Fox, KDKA-Radio; Gary Wills; 
Richard Valeriani, NBC news 
correspondent; C. Brooks Peters, New 
York Times correspondent. Other 
recent speakers have been Alex Haley, 
Mark Lane, Vincent Bugliosi, Geraldo 
Rivera and Mel Blanc. 

Cultural events this past year included 
The Pocket Mime Theatre, the Dance 
Workshop of Al Wiltz, the Actors 



14 



Theatre of Louisville production of "In 
Fashion," and Mildred Miller, mezzo 
soprano. 

Numerous art and photographic shows, 
including the Bethany Fall and Spring 
Art Exhibitions, were displayed in 
Renner Union Lounge. Student and 
faculty shows were exhibited 
throughout the year. 

Besides the regular Friday and 
Saturday night schedule of first-run 
movies, numerous foreign and 
experimental art films were shown 
during the year. 



Music 



Theatre 



Drama is one of the most important co- 
curricular activities at Bethany. Nearly 
one-fourth of the last senior class 
participated in a production while at 
Bethany. Often acting, directing, 
playwriting, and producing are 
correlated with courses in the theatre 
department. Non-theatre majors have 
every opportunity to participate. 

Most of the productions are staged in 
Wailes Theatre of the Steinman Fine 
Arts Center. The theatre seats 300 
people and has a fully equipped 
workshop. Most plays are performed 
three or four times. 

Last year's productions included The 
Last Great Artie Shaw Fan, The Belle 
of Amherst, The Merchant of Venice, 
Amahl and the Night Visitors, Dark of 
the Moon, Pippin and student-directed 
one-act plays. 



There is a wide range of musical groups 
on campus in both the vocal and 
instrumental fields. 

The Concert Choir performs on campus 
and goes on tour each spring. The 
repertoire consists primarily of serious 
sacred and secular works of many 
periods. There is opportunity within the 
choir itself for the formation of smaller 
ensembles to cultivate special types of 
repertoire. 

The Madrigal Ensemble and Glee Club 
are select groups which sing a variety 
of types of works. These groups, and 
others in the community, form the 
Oratorio Chorus which annually 
presents a major concert during the 
Christmas season. 

The College Band performs at athletic 
contests and for special occasions 
throughout the year. Band members 
attend an instrumental seminar each 
fall before the opening of school. 

The Jazz Band, a select group of 
players, performs the big band 
repertoire. This group annually tours 
various high schools in West Virginia, 
Ohio and Pennsylvania. 

The Brass Choir appears at formal 
convocations and in concerts. It is open 
to qualified players by audition as 
vacancies occur. 

Chamber Music is provided by 
woodwind quintets, string quartets, and 
smaller ensembles that develop 
annually and are open to all who play 
orchestral instruments. 

There is opportunity for proficient 
orchestral musicians, especially string 
players, to play in the Wheeling 
Symphony. To be admitted into this 
orchestra one must audition with the 
Symphony's director. 




Publications and 
Radio-TV 

Student-produced publications include a 
campus newspaper, The Tower; a 
yearbook, The Bethanian; a literary 
journal, The Harbinger; a foreign 
language periodical, The Polyglot; and a 
magazine, The Folio. This past year, the 
newspaper, the yearbook, the literary 
journal and the magazine won national 
awards for excellence. There is also a 
campus radio station, WVBC-FM, and a 
campus television station, Cable 3. 

All of these media are under the 
supervision of the Board of 
Communications which is chaired by the 
president of the Student Board of 
Governors. The board includes the 
student editors and business managers 
of all publications, the general manager 
and program director of the radio and 
television stations, and members of the 
faculty and administration. 



15 



Intercollegiate 
Athletics, 
Intramurals, and 
Recreation 

Bethany College is a member of 
Division III of the National Collegiate 
Athletic Association and the 
Association for Intercollegiate Athletics 
for Women. Men's intercollegiate sports 
include baseball, basketball, cross 
country, football, golf, lacrosse, soccer, 
swimming, tennis, and track. Bethany's 
men's teams compete in the Presidents' 
Athletic Conference which also includes 
the following colleges and universities: 
Allegheny, Carnegie-Mellon, Thiel, and 
Washington & Jefferson in western 
Pennsylvania; and Case-Western 
Reserve, Hiram, and John Carroll in 
Ohio. The women's athletic teams 
compete in the Pennwood West 
Conference in the following sports: 
basketball, field hockey, lacrosse, 
Softball, tennis, and volleyball. 
Membership in the section of the 
Pennwood West Conference in which 
Bethany participates includes: 
Carnegie-Mellon, Chatham, Carlow, 
Seton Hill, St. Francis, Washington & 
Jefferson. 




16 



Recreation is provided for the entire 
student body through an extensive 
intramural and open recreation 
program. Men's intramural sports 
include basketball, bowling, cross 
country, football, golf, racketball, 
softball, swimming, table tennis, tennis, 
track, volleyball, and wrestling. 
Women's intramural sports include 
bowling, basketball, cross country, 
softball, table tennis, football, 
swimming, tennis, track, and volleyball. 
The director of intramural athletics 
supervises the program. 

Bethany encourages students to 
develop skills in recreational activities 
that may be continued through life. In 
addition to the usual team sports, staff 
instruction is available in archery, 
badminton, horseback riding, 
swimming, golf, tennis, camping 
techniques, jogging, body mechanics, 
bowling, dancing, gymnastics, and 
aerobics. 

There are many opportunities available 
for students who wish to pursue 
recreational interests. The 1,600 acres 
of College land provide a natural 
setting for hiking and nature study. The 
Wilderness Club provides for camping, 
backpacking, and rafting. Ski slopes 



and riding stables are available at 
nearby Oglebay Park. The Dutch Fork 
Hunt Club invites students to go fox 
hunting from September through 
February. Local farmers are willing to 
board horses. Three public, 18-hole golf 
courses, including one of Robert Trent 
Jones design, are located within 10 
miles of campus. 

Student Health 
Services 

All students entering Bethany for the 
first time are required to submit a 
completed physical examination form 
before registration. After arrival, the 
College health service is maintained by 
student fees, and all students are 
entitled to infirmary privileges as in- 
patients and out-patients. 



The Bethany infirmary is on 24-hour 
call for illnesses and injuries which 
occur during the academic year. Medical 
service is not available at the infirmary 
during vacations and recess periods. 
Students who suffer serious illnesses 
and accidents are usually treated at the 
Wheeling Hospital, located 15 miles 
from the town of Bethany which 
maintains ambulance service for 
emergencies. 

The College physicians have regular 
office hours each weekday morning 
during the school year for free 
consultation. In case of an emergency 
operation, when the parents cannot be 
reached, the Dean of Students, upon 
the recommendation of the College 
physician, assumes the responsibility of 
giving permission for operations. 

Bethany provides medical, surgical, and 
hospitalization insurance. All students 
are automatically included in the 
coverage from September 1 to August 
31 and are charged accordingly unless 
the appropriate waiver is forwarded to 
the Business Office. Expenses for 
outside consultation and treatment are 
the responsibility of the student in all 
cases when not covered by insurance. 




Religious Life 

A variety of religious backgrounds is 
represented in the student body and 
faculty. While participation in religious 
concerns is entirely voluntary, there are 
substantial opportunities for religious 
exploration and participation on 
campus. 

Many students find in Bethany 
Memorial Church an opportunity for 
expression of their religious faith. The 
minister of this church, who is also the 
College chaplain, is available to 
students for counseling and advice on 
personal and religious matters. 

The Bishop of Wheeling-Steubenville 
Diocese of the Roman Catholic Church 
provides a chaplain for Catholic 
students. He is available on a weekly 
schedule for counseling, in addition to 
the celebration of Mass each Sunday 
and on Holy days. 

The Jewish fellowship meets for 
worship and study. Jewish 
congregations in Steubenville and 
Wheeling sponsor the fellowship and 
entertain Jewish students for the high 
holidays. 

Placement 

The Placement Office assists and 
advises underclass students, graduating 
seniors and alumni in planning careers 
and in obtaining temporary and/or 
permanent jobs. The office maintains a 
campus interview schedule, a career 
library and resource center consisting 
of career-planning literature, job 
announcements and graduate and 
professional school information. Free 
credential service is available to those 
who register by completing the 
necessary forms. In addition to 
providing counsel for resume 
preparation, interview techniques and 
job procedures, the placement director 
is a member of the Career Advisement 
Committee of the faculty. Bethany also 
has established a reciprocal agreement 
with four area colleges to offer students 
an opportunity to schedule personal 
interviews with representatives of firms 
visiting those campuses. 



Advising and 
Counseling 

Bethany recognizes the need to provide 
its entering students with an 
introduction to their work in new 
surroundings and therefore requires 
freshmen to come to the campus several 
days before the formal registration of 
other students. The orientation period 
is planned not only to introduce the 
students to the College but also to 
introduce the College to the students. 

From the beginning of their collegiate 
career, students are assigned a faculty 
advisor. Through the Bethany Plan 
curriculum, freshmen advisors come 
into weekly seminar contact with their 
advisees. Thus, they have ample 
opportunity to observe student 
strengths and weaknesses in academic 
situations as well as in more relaxed 
and informal counseling situations. 

After students choose a major field of 
concentration, they are then assigned to 
a faculty advisor in their -chosen 
department. This advisor helps the 
student plan an academic program 
consistent with the aims and 
requirements of the department in a 
liberal arts education, and a program 
which is in keeping with the student's 
abilities and aspirations. 

The chief officer in charge of student 
advising and counseling, student 
welfare, and coordination of all student 
personnel administration is the Dean of 
Students. Members of his staff are 
available for help in all major areas of 
guidance, including post graduate and 
career planning. 



17 



James J. Humes 
David M. Hutter 
Arthur Z. Kovacs 
John W. Lozier 
J. Trevor Peirce 
T. Gale Thompson 
Burton B. Thurston 



Advisors 

For Freshmen 

Lynn Adkins 
William B. Allen 
James E. Allison 
Albert R. Buckelew, Jr. 
Leonora Balla Cayard 
James E. Dafler 
John U. Davis 
J. Daniel Draper 
Kurt P. Dudt 
Larry E. Grimes 
William A. Herzog, Jr. 

For Fields of Concentration 

Art Walter L. Kornowski 

Biology Gary E. Larson 

Chemistry J. Daniel Draper 

Communications William A. Herzog, Jr. 
Economics and Business Ralph A. Maggio 

Education Ann C. Shelly 

English Larry E.Grimes 

Fine Arts John R. Taylor 

Foreign Languages Leonora Balla Cayard 
History and Political 

Science 
Interdisciplinary Studies 
Mathematics 



Music 

Philosophy 

Physical Education 

Physics 

Psychology 

Religious Studies 

Sociology and Social Work 

Theatre 



William L. Young 

Larry E.Grimes 

James E.Allison 

William P. Crosbie 

Robert E.Myers 

David M. Hutter 

Arthur Z. Kovacs 

J. Trevor Pierce 

Richard B. Kenney 

Lynn Adkins 

David J. Judy 




For Career Interests 



Dentistry 

Drama 

Engineering 

Law 

Medicine J. Daniel 

Ministry 

Radio 

Recreation Leadersh 

Social Work 

Teaching 

Television 

Veterinary Medicine 



J. Daniel Draper 

David J. Judy 

Arthur Z. Kovacs 

William L. Young 

Draper, Gary E. Larson 

Richard B. Kenney 

James J. Humes 

ip David M. Hutter 

Lynn Adkins 

Ann C. Shelly 

Kurt P. Dudt 

Gary E. Larson 



For Special Services 

Campus Employment 
Counseling 
Foreign Students 



Graduate Fellowships 

and Scholarships 
Ministerial Training 

Awards 
Social Security and 

Veterans Benefits 
Social and 

Recreational 

Activities 
Testing 



Nancy Ault 
Kathryn Philliben 
Gary E. Larson, 
Kathryn Philliben 



Robert E.Myers 

Robert A. Sandercox 

Joseph M. Kurey 



Darline B. Nicholson 
Kathryn Philliben 
Undergraduate Scholarships 

Theodore W. Bunnell, Myla Kovacs 
Vocational Information 
and Guidance Nancy Ault 



Pre-Professional 
Study 

Health Professions 

Students desiring to prepare for the 
study of medicine, dentistry, or any of 
the health related fields will find 
instruction and facilities at Bethany 
which satisfy the entrance requirements 
for the best professional schools. 

The Medical College Admissions Test or 
the Dental Admissions Test, covering 
medical or dental school entrance 
requirements in chemistry, biology, and 
physics as well as the social sciences 
and humanities, must be taken in the 
junior year. A program furnishing the 
proper sequence of courses to prepare 
students to take either of these tests 
requires that both beginning chemistry 
and biology be taken in the first 
semester of the freshman year. 

The Career Advisement Committee of 
the faculty disseminates information on 
the professional programs and entrance 
requirements in the various health 
related areas as well as writes letters of 
reference and helps students gain some 
experience in the matters of interviews. 

Pre-Law 

Most law schools do not require specific 
undergraduate courses for entrance. 
Rather they expect the broadest 
possible educational background. They 
do, however, recommend that the 
prospective law student acquire skills in 
three basic areas: 1) effectiveness in the 
comprehension and expression of the 
English language, 2) insight into the 



18 



understanding of human institutions 
and values, 3) creative power in 
thinking. Courses in English 
composition and literature, history, 
ethics, logic, economics, political 
science, sociology, and accounting are 
particularly useful in acquiring these 
skills. 

Pre-E ngineering 

Training in the sciences and humanities 
provides a good foundation for pre- 
engineering students, some of whom 
desire to transfer to an engineering 
school after carefully following the 
requirements of the engineering school 
they wish to enter. 

By cooperative arrangement with 
Columbia University, Georgia Institute 
of Technology, and Washington 
University, Bethany offers the first 
three years of a five-year course and 
arranges for the qualified student to 
transfer to one of these engineering 
schools for the last two years of 
undergraduate training. Upon 
completion of the five-year program, 
degrees from both institutions are 
granted. For more information about 
these programs, see page 44. 

Professional Chemistry 

A thorough preparation for professional 
chemistry and a background in the 
liberal arts at Bethany conforms to 
American Chemical Society standards. 
Independent study introduces the 
student to the principles of research 
which aids in any contemplated 
graduate or industrial work following 
graduation. 




Pre-Theological 

Students who plan to enter church 
vocations are expected to complete 
their preparation in seminaries and 
graduate schools of religion after 
graduating from Bethany. Their 
undergraduate studies, therefore, are 
primarily liberal arts. Students elect 
courses which provide necessary 
pre-seminary studies in the natural and 
social sciences, the arts and humanities, 
and religion. 

Social Work Education 

Students may qualify for entry-level 
positions in the social work profession 
by completing an undergraduate major 
in Bethany's social work program. The 
liberal arts emphasis of The Bethany 
Plan provides a rich setting for career 
preparation in this essentially humane 
profession. The undergraduate social 
work program is also solid preparation 
for graduate work in the field. 
Although it is desirable to enter the 
program as early as possible, course 
requirements can be met during the 
student's junior and senior years. For 
further information, see the head of the 
Sociology and Social Work Department. 

Teacher Education 

The preparation of teachers for the 
secondary and elementary schools is 
one of the major professional 
preparation programs at the college. 
Requirements for certification may be 
found in the course listings for the 
individual academic departments. 
Students wishing to prepare for a 
career in teaching should contact the 
head of the Education Department for 
further information in the freshman 
year or as soon as the decision is made. 



Achievement 
Recognition 

Bethany encourages achievement in 
scholarship and leadership in student 
affairs by public recognition at 
Commencement, Honors Day, 
Founder's Day, and on other suitable 
occasions. 

Graduation Honors 

Students who have done academic work 
of unusual merit are graduated with 
honors: Summa Cum Laude (3.85), 
Magna Cum Laude (3.65), or Cum 
Laude (3.35). The awarding of honors is 
determined upon the basis of total 
quality points earned, standing in the 
Senior Comprehensive Examination, 
and the recommendation of the 
student's advisor. 

Students who do unusually well on the 
Senior Comprehensive Examination are 
listed at graduation as having "passed 
with distinction." 

Dean's List 

At the end of each semester, students 
who have rated high academically 
(grade point average of 3.65 or better) 
are designated as "Students 
Distinguished in Scholarship." Often 
called the Dean's List, this distinction is 
determined by the Honors Committee. 



19 



Senior Fellowships 

Certain members of the junior class 
may be designated as senior fellows for 
the following year. The selection is 
made from students who have 
demonstrated unusual excellence in 
their field of concentration and who, by 
character and ability, can do special 
work in a department or area as an 
assistant in instruction or research. 

Usually no more than 12 full-year senior 
fellowships and one senior fellowship 
at-large (or the equivalents) are 
awarded in any one year. Usually no 
more than one full-year appointment (or 
the equivalent) will be made in any one 
department or area. Although the title 
of senior-fellow-at-large is provided 
primarily for capable students involved 
in interdisciplinary programs, students 
in other fields of concentration may be 
nominated for this category. 

The selection of senior fellows is made 
by the Honors Committee from 
nominations usually presented by 
department heads. 



20 



Honor Societies 

A number of honor societies have been 
established at Bethany through the 
years to recognize academic 
achievement and campus leadership. 

Gamma Sigma Kappa is a scholastic 
society founded at Bethany in 1932. 
Students who have achieved a 
cumulative scholarship index of at least 
3.70 (over at least four consecutive 
semesters and provided that in no 
semester their scholastic index falls 
below a 3.00) may, upon 
recommendation of the Honors 
Committee, be considered for 
membership. Usually, however, not 
more than 10 per cent of any class will 
be recommended. 

Bethany Kalon is a junior and senior 
society established in 1948 to give 
recognition to students of high 
character who have demonstrated 
competent and unselfish leadership in 
student activities and have been 
constructive citizens of the college 
community. Selection is made by the 
members of the society with the advice 
and approval of the Honors Committee. 

Alpha Phi Chapter of Beta Beta Beta 

is for students of the biological sciences. 
Its purpose is to stimulate sound 
scholarship, to promote the 
dissemination of scientific truth, and to 
encourage investigation into the life 
sciences. 

Gamma Upsilon Chapter of Lambda 
Iota Tau. Lambda Iota Tau is an 
international honor society for the 
encouragement and reward of 
scholastic excellence in the study of 
literature. Membership is limited to 
juniors and seniors who have a 
cumulative scholarship index of 3.0, 
who have completed a minimum of 12 
semester hours of literature courses 
with at least a 3.0 grade-point average 
in them and in all prerequisite courses, 
and who have presented a scholarly, 
critical, or creative paper which has 
been accepted by the chapter. Lambda 
Iota Tau is a member of the Association 
of College Honor Societies. 



Alpha Chapter of Omicron Delta 
Epsilon, an international honor society 
in economics, was established in 1960 to 
recognize excellence in the study of 
economics. Membership is limited to 
students who have completed a 
minimum of 16 semester hours of 
economics, including either Economics 
301 or 302, and who have achieved both 
a departmental and overall grade-point 
average of 3.25 or better. 

Beta Gamma Chapter of Alpha Psi 
Omega. Alpha Psi Omega is a national 
recognition society in dramatics. 
Students qualify by faithful work in 
playing major and minor roles or 
working with technical or business 
aspects of theatre. 

Mu Epsilon Chapter of Phi Alpha 
Theta was established at Bethany in 
1967 to recognize excellence in the 
study of history. Its membership is 
limited to those students who have 
completed at least 12 hours of history 
with a grade-point average of 3.0 or 
better and with at least a 3.0 grade- 
point average in two-thirds of all other 
studies. Members must also rank in the 
upper 35 per cent of their class. 

Bethany Chapter of the Society for 
Collegiate Journalists, a national 
recognition society in journalism, is 
designed to stimulate interest in 
journalism, foster the mutual welfare of 
student publications, and reward 
journalists for their efforts, service, and 
accomplishments. 




Awards 



Kappa XI Chapter of Sigma Delta Pi 

is an honor society for those who attain 
excellence in the study of the Spanish 
language and the literature and culture 
of the Spanish peoples. Students who 
are at least second semester 
sophomores and have a high scholastic 
index and who have completed at least 
one advanced course in Spanish 
literature are eligible for membership. 

Epsilon Chi Chapter of Kappa Pi is for 

students of graphic arts. Its purpose is 
to uphold the highest ideals of a liberal 
education, to provide a means whereby 
students with artistic commitment meet 
for the purpose of informal study and 



entertainment, to raise the standards of 
productive artistic work, and to furnish 
the highest reward for conscientious 
effort in furthering the best interest in 
art in the broadest sense of the term. 

Alpha Chapter of Kappa Mu Epsilon, 

a national honor society in 
mathematics, was established in 1975 to 
recognize outstanding achievement in 
mathematics. Its membership is limited 
to those students who have completed 
at least three semesters at Bethany, 
rank in the upper 35 per cent of their 
class, have completed at least three 
mathematics courses, including one 
semester of calculus, and have a grade- 
point average of 3.0 or better in all 
mathematics courses. 

Phi Delta Psi is a physical education 
honorary for both men and women 
which encourages scholarship, 
leadership, fellowship, high educational 
standards and participation in 
departmental activities. To be eligible, 
students must be at the second 
semester level of the sophomore year 
and achieve a grade point average of at 
least 3.0. 



Oreon E . Scott Award is presented to 
the graduating senior who has achieved 
the highest academic record over a 
four-year period of study. The donor of 
this award was a long-time Bethany 
trustee and a graduate of the class of 
1892. 

Anna Ruth Bourne Award stimulates 
scholarship among the women's social 
groups. A silver cup, provided by an 
anonymous donor in honor of the 
former distinguished head of the 
English department, is awarded to the 
recognized women's group whose active 
membership earns the highest 
scholarship standing each semester. The 
group winning the cup for four 
semesters is presented with a smaller 
replica as a permanent trophy. 

W. Kirk Woolery Award encourages 
scholarship among the men's social 
groups. A silver cup, donated by friends 
of the late Dr. Woolery, a former Dean 
and Provost of the College, is held by 
the recognized men's social group or 
housing organization whose 
membership (active membership only in 
the case of fraternities) earns the 
highest scholarship standing each 
semester. Any group winning the cup 
for four semesters is presented with a 
smaller replica as a permanent trophy. 



21 



Beta Beta Beta— B. R. Weimer Award 

is presented to the senior biology major 
who has attained the highest academic 
rank in this field of concentration. 

Florence Hoagland Memorial Award, 

given by a graduate of the class of 1944, 
is presented to the outstanding senior 
English major. The award honors the 
memory of the late Miss Hoagland who 
was for many years Professor of 
English at Bethany. 

Christine Burleson Memorial Award, 

given by a graduate of the class of 1936, 
is presented to a senior English major 
who has attained excellence in this field 
of concentration. The award honors the 
memory of the late Miss Burleson who 
was Professor of English and Dean of 
Women from 1932 to 1936. 

Cammie Pendleton Awards, named in 
honor of Miss A. Campbellina 
Pendleton, Professor of Language and 
Literature at Bethany from 1884 to 
1909, are presented to the outstanding 
junior and sophomore concentrating in 
English. The awards are given by 
Dwight B. MacCormack, Jr., of the 
class of 1956, in memory of his 
grandmother, Dr. T. Marion 
MacCormack. 

E. E. Roberts Distinguished Prize in 
Campus Journalism is awarded to an 
outstanding student who excels in work 
on a student publication, in academic 
work in the Communications 
department, or both. 



Winfred E. Garrison Prize is 

presented in recognition of outstanding 
achievement in one or more areas of 
philosophy. The award honors the 
memory of the late Dr. Winfred E. 
Garrison, graduate of the class of 1892, 
whose humane concerns and scholarly 
achievements contributed significantly 
to the area of higher education, history, 
and philosophy. 

Outstanding Junior Woman Award is 

provided by the Pittsburgh Bethany 
College Club, comprising the Bethany 
alumnae of Pittsburgh. This award is 
based on qualities of leadership, 
character, conduct, and scholarship. 
The club has placed a suitable plaque in 
Phillips Hall on which names of the 
winners are engraved. In addition, an 
individual gift is made to the recipient. 

Vira I. Heinz Award is granted to the 
junior woman who has distinguished 
herself by leadership, character, 
conduct, and scholarship and whose 
proposal for foreign travel most 
significantly supplements her 
educational objectives. This award for 
summer travel is provided by the fund 
of Vira I. Heinz, recipient of the 
honorary Doctor of Religious Education 
degree from Bethany in 1969. 

Benjamin Chandler Shaw Travel 
Award is granted to the junior man 
who has distinguished himself by 
leadership, character, conduct and 
scholarship and whose proposal for 
foreign travel most significantly 
supplements his educational objectives. 
This award is funded by an anonymous 
friend of the college in recognition of 
Dr. Shaw, Bethany's George T. Oliver 
Distinguished Professor of History and 
Political Science Emeritus. Dr. Shaw 
joined the Bethany faculty in 1935, 
served from 1945 to 1966 as head of the 
Department of History and Political 
Science and continued part-time until 
1973. 

W. F. Kennedy Prize is given to the 
outstanding young man in the junior 
class. This award, established by W. F. 
Kennedy of Wheeling, West Virginia, is 



awarded on the basis of the student's 
contribution to the college community 
life through leadership in activities, in 
personal character, and scholarship. 

Pearl Mahaffey Prize is awarded to 
the outstanding senior major in 
Languages. The award was established 
by Mrs. Walter M. Haushalter and 
other former students of Bethany's 
emeritus professor of foreign 
languages. The prize honors Miss 
Mahaffey, a faculty member from 
1908-1949 and a trustee of the College 
at the time of her death in 1971. 

Shirley Morris Memorial Award was 

established by Theta Chapter of Zeta 
Tau Alpha in memory of Shirley Morris, 
a loyal member and past president of 
the chapter. It is given to the 
outstanding student in the field of 
modern languages. Selection is made by 
the Department of Foreign Languages. 

Margaret R. Woods Prize, sponsored 
by the Kappa Xi Chapter of Sigma 
Delta Pi, is awarded to the outstanding 
Spanish major. The prize honors Miss 
Woods who was a faculty member from 
1943 until her retirement in 1965. 
Selection is made by the Department of 
Foreign Languages. 

Auguste Comte Award is presented to 
the senior of the Sociology Department 
for outstanding scholarship and keen 
interest in the field. The award is 
named after the founding father of the 
discipline. 

Charles H. Manion Award is made to 
the outstanding senior art major. The 
award memorializes Charles H. Manion, 
long-time trustee of Bethany College 
who was associated with the steel 
industry in the Ohio Valley and who 



22 



enjoyed painting. The prize is provided 
by his daughter, Mrs. Leonard Yurko, 
Weirton. 

Theodore R. Kimpton Prize is 

awarded to the outstanding senior 
French major. This prize, which is 
restricted to those students whose 
native language is other than French, 
was established by Theodore R. 
Kimpton, assistant professor of foreign 
languages at Bethany prior to his 
retirement from full-time teaching in 
1975. 

J. S. V. Allen Memorial is a fund 
established by the family and friends of 
Professor Allen to provide for an 
annual award to the outstanding 
physics student. 

Frank Alfred Chapman Memorial is a 

fund established by Dr. Stanton 
Crawford to provide for an annual 
award to the outstanding history 
student. Preference is given to students 
of American history and the Ohio 
Valley. 

Osborne Booth Prize is given to the 
student who excels in the field of 
religious studies and in the overall 
academic program. The late Osborne 
Booth was T. W. Phillips Professor of 
Old Testament when he retired in 1964 
after 35 years of teaching at Bethany. 

Francis O. Carfer Prize is given to the 
senior who, in the judgment of the 
Honors Committee, has made the most 
outstanding contribution to the College. 
Mr. Carfer, a trustee of Bethany 
College for 29 years, was a graduate of 
the class of 1909. Recipients of the 
award must display sound academic 
accomplishments and characteristics of 
loyalty, service, and devotion to 
Bethany. 



W. H. Cramblet Prize recognizes 
outstanding achievement in 
mathematics. It is named in honor of 
Wilbur H. Cramblet, the eleventh 
president of Bethany College. 

John J. Knight Award is presented to 
the senior male Physical Education 
major displaying outstanding 
scholarship and athletic participation 
during his four years at Bethany. 

S. Elizabeth Reed Award is presented 
to the senior woman showing 
outstanding scholarship and athletic 
participation during her four years at 
Bethany. 

A. Kenneth Stevenson Theatre Award 

is presented each year to the 
outstanding Bethany junior or senior of 
any discipline with a grade point 
average above 3.2 who has contributed 
the most significantly to Bethany 
College Theatre activity. The award 
also provides for guest artists to 
enhance the program in Theatre. 
A. Kenneth Stevenson of Washington, 
Pa., was a long-time supporter of the 
Bethany College Theatre program until 
his death in 1979. Mrs. A. Kenneth 
Stevenson, her sons, Drew and Mark, 
both graduates of Bethany, and 
members of the Department of Theatre 
make the yearly selections. 

Forrest H. Kirkpatrick Award is 

presented annually to the outstanding 
senior concentrating in economics and 
business. The award is named in honor 
of Dr. Kirkpatrick, long-time dean of 
the College who is currently serving as 
adjunct professor of economics. 

Wall Street Journal Award is given to 
the student majoring in Economics who 
has the highest average in select 
department courses and has shown 
strong participation in departmental 
activities. 

Senior Chemistry Award, given by an 
anonymous donor, is granted to the 
senior concentrating in chemistry who 
has achieved the highest cumulative 
average in the department, including 
the record made on the Senior 
Comprehensive Examination. 



Psychology Society Award is 

presented to the senior major in 
psychology who has maintained the 
highest academic average in the 
department. 

Society for Collegiate Journalists 
Award of Merit is presented to an 
upperclass writer or editor for 
significant contributions to campus 
student publications. 

WVBC-FM Senior Award is given to 
the senior who for four years has lent 
qualities of dedication, loyalty, 
leadership, talent, and creativity to 
WVBC's operations. 

WVBC-FM Talent Award is presented 
to the member of the WVBC staff who 
has offered the most outstanding 
continuous radio programming during 
the year. 

Freshman Writing Prizes, provided by 
alumni and awarded by the Department 
of English, are given annually to 
authors of the best essays written in 
Freshman Seminars. Each seminar 
leader submits the two best essays from 
the group and the winning essays 
are determined by a panel of judges. 

Research Awards 

The Gans Fund Awards are presented 
to juniors, seniors and graduates of the 
College who are engaged in approved 
study and research in some specific 
field at Bethany or elsewhere. The 
awards were established by Wickliffe 
Campbell Gans of the Class of 1870 and 
Emmett W. Gans in memory of their 
father and mother, Daniel L. and 
Margaret Gordon Gans. 



23 



Admission 



Bethany accepts applications for 
admission from qualified candidates. 
Admission is based on a careful review 
of all credentials presented by the 
candidate. The Committee on 
Admission accepts candidates it 
considers best qualified among those 
applying. In no case does the meeting of 
minimum standards assure admission. 

Bethany's admission policy enables the 
Committee on Admission to act on 
completed applications as they are 
received. Applicants will be notified of 
the Committee's decision approximately 
three weeks after all credentials have 
been received. Early application is 
advised. 

The College seeks students who have 
prepared themselves for a liberal arts 
curriculum by taking at least 15 units of 
college-preparatory work. Although the 
College does not prescribe how these 
units should be distributed, it expects a 
minimum of four years of English and 
the usual sequences in mathematics, 
science, foreign languages, and social 
studies. For students who have 
developed individual curricula or are 
involved in experimental honors 
programs, the Committee on Admission 
makes special evaluation. 



■ r 




The application process includes 
furnishing a transcript of completed 
work, a personal file, two references, 
and either the College Entrance 
Examination Board Scholastic Aptitude 
Test (SAT) scores or the American 
College Testing Program (ACT) scores. 
Supporting documents that might be of 
help in the process of admission, i.e., 
poetry, plays, short stories, music, 
artwork, photography, and journalistic 
writings, may also be submitted. 

Although not required, an on -campus 
interview with an admission officer is 
highly recommended. A campus visit 
will enable a student to develop some 
sensitivities about Bethany's lifestyle. A 
comprehensive tour, observation of 
classes, and interaction with Bethany 
students and faculty are available upon 
request. 



Prospective students are also invited to 
remain overnight as the guest of a 
Bethany student. Meals and overnight 
accommodations in college housing for 
prospective students are courtesy of the 
College. Lodging for parents is 
available at Gresham House, as well as 
nearby lodges, motels, and hotels. 
Transportation arrangements from the 
Greater Pittsburgh International 
Airport are easily made through the 
Admission Office. 



25 



For those students who are unable to 
visit campus, interview sessions are 
held annually in New York City, 
Washington, D.C., Philadelphia, 
Boston, Pittsburgh, and other cities. 
Interested students will be advised as to 
the particulars of these sessions. 

The Admission Office is open Monday 
through Friday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. 
and Saturday 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. 
throughout the year. Appointments 
may be made by calling 304-829-7611 or 
writing the Admission Office, Bethany 
College, Bethany, West Virginia 26032. 
A brochure will be sent, detailing travel 
routes and comfortable overnight 
accommodations. 



Transfers 



Transfer students are welcome. 
Procedures for transferring to Bethany 
are similar to those for freshmen, 
except that the interview is required. 
Any student in good standing at a fully 
accredited institution of higher 
education is eligible for acceptance. A 
majority of students accepted as 
transfers have above average grades 
and are seeking a campus life unlike 
that which they have experienced. 

Grades of "C" or better are accepted 
along with course work in which credit 
(on a credit/no credit basis) or pass (in a 
pass/fail system) has been received. If 
requested, course work from other 
institutions will be reviewed by 
Bethany's registrar prior to making 
application. 



Community/Junior 
College Graduates 

Students who have received or will 
receive an Associate in Arts or 
Associate in Science Degree and find 
Bethany's curriculum suited to their 
educational goals are encouraged to 
apply. 

Holders of the A.A./A.S. Degree who 
are accepted receive at least two years 
(minimum of 60 hours) credit, enter as 
juniors, and receive all the rights and 
privileges of upperclass students. 

Foreign Students 

Bethany is eager to review applications 
of students from other countries. 
Approximately 16 foreign countries are 
represented on campus each year. 

Students from non-English-speaking 
countries are required to submit, along 
with an application for admission, a 
complete secondary school transcript, 
the results of either the American 
College Testing Program (ACT) or the 
College Entrance Examination Board 
Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) and the 
Test of English as a Foreign Language 
(TOEFL), and at least two letters of 
recommendation. Applicants for the 
Fall Semester must submit the above 
stated materials by February 1, and 
candidates for the Spring Semester by 
July 1. 

Foreign students are also requested to 
complete a Foreign Student's Financial 
Aid Application and Declaration. This 
form is to be returned with admission 
materials by the deadlines mentioned. 
Although Bethany is willing to review 
requests for financial assistance, funds 
are limited. 

Early Admission 

Some students complete their 
secondary school graduation 
requirements a year early and decide to 
pursue college admission after their 
junior year. For those who have 
demonstrated maturity and show 
evidence of a strong academic 



background, Bethany offers a program 
for early admission. For this type of 
admission, the usual admission 
procedures must be followed. A 
personal interview on campus as well as 
a discussion between the student's 
college counselor and a Bethany 
admission officer are required. 

Advanced 
Placement 

Students may receive advanced 
placement and/or credit from any 
department in the College through a 
testing program and must be 
accomplished before the end of the first 
year at Bethany College. Those who 
wish to receive credit by examination 
should consult with the coordinator of 
counseling services and the appropriate 
department head. 

Credit may be received or courses 
waived as a result of high scores on the 
College Entrance Examination Board 
Testing Program for Advanced 
Placement. The waiving of courses or 
granting of credit, however, are 
departmental matters and require 
consultation with the appropriate 
department head upon matriculation. 



27 



Expenses 
and 

Financial 
Aid 



Bethany College is a non-profit 
institution. Tuition, fees, and other 
general charges paid by the student 
cover less than three-fourths of the 
College's instructional and operational 
expenses. The remainder comes from 
income from endowment funds and 
from gifts and contributions. Bethany 
continues to keep the costs required 
from the student as low as possible. 

Comprehensive 
Charges 

Comprehensive charges of 
approximately $6,300 for a year at 
Bethany include the following: 

Tuition and Fees $4,485 

Room $600 

Board $970 

Student Board of Governors $100 
Bethany House-Benedum Commons $50 

Linen $52 

Health Insurance $90 



While a general charge is stated for 
Tuition and Fees, this fee may be 
divided into $3,985 for tuition and $500 
for the following activities and services: 
athletics, health service, library, 
lectures, plays, concerts, publications, 
student activities, and laboratory 
services with the exception of music 
and art. 

The Bethany House-Benedum 
Commons Fee is charged to all 
registered students and covers the 
operation and maintenance costs of the 
student union. 

No reduction is made in student 
accounts for course changes made after 
the first two weeks of the semester. The 
College is required to collect a three per 
cent West Virginia sales tax on 
published charges for room, linen, and 
parking permits, and two per cent on 
board. Bethany reserves the right to 
change, without advance notice, the 
price for room, board, linen, and health 
insurance. 

Withdrawals and 
Refunds 

After registration, there is no refund of 
room charges or fees. A student 
voluntarily withdrawing or 
withdrawing because of illness during 
the course of the semester will be 
charged 10 per cent of tuition charges 
for each week of attendance or part 
thereof. There is no refund of tuition 
after the tenth week of attendance. 
There is no refund in the event that a 
student is dismissed or asked to 
withdraw during the course of the 
semester. Board refund is prorated, 
based upon food costs only. Special fees 
are not refundable. 

A student wishing to withdraw from 
Bethany must file written notice with 
the Dean of Students to qualify for 
refund of deposit and adjustment of 
other charges. 



Admission and 
Registration Fees 

Application for Admission 

A non-refundable $15 fee is required at 
the time of formal application. 

Application for Readmission 

Students previously enrolled in Bethany 
College who wish to return for 
additional work must file an Application 
for Readmission with the Registrar's 
Office. A $5 fee is required at the time 
such application is made. 

Registration Deposit 

Upon acceptance for admission or 
readmission, a $100 registration deposit 
is required of all students. Once this 
deposit is paid it is not refunded until 
after graduation or until a Bethany 
student completes the following 
procedure. 

Students not being graduated may have 
the deposit refunded after the last term 
of their attendance if written notice is 
given to the Business Office prior to the 
advance enrollment date for the next 
regular term. Such students may be 
readmitted by approval of the Dean of 
Students and the Business Manager. 

Matriculation Fee 

A $20 fee, payable once by every new 
student, covers, in part, the cost of 
orientation and evaluation procedures 
for new students. 



29 



Fees for Overseas 
Programs 

Oxford: 

$3,080 for one semester for tuition and 
fees, room and board and activity fees. 

Madrid: 

tuition and fees for one semester 
($2,500) includes round-trip air fare, 
tuition and examination fees and 
stipend to sponsor in Madrid. 

Sorbonne: 

tuition and fees for one semester 
($2,500) includes round-trip air fare, 
tuition and stipend to sponsor in Paris. 

Tubingen: 

tuition and fees for one semester 
($2,500) includes round-trip air fare, 
tuition and stipend to sponsor in 
Tubingen. 

Other Special Fees 

Chemistry 490 $20 

Education 470: off -campus student 

teaching (per semester) $2,355. 

(includes tuition, fees and preschool 
week board privileges in the 
Bethany dining hall) 
English 284 $15 

Physical Education 340 $30 

Each academic hour when less 

than 13 $170 

Each academic hour 

in excess of 16 $140 

Auditing a course, per 

semester hour $ 140 

(a student is not charged if paying 
regular tuition and fees and the total 
program, including the audit, does not 
exceed 18 hours) 




Comprehensive Examination $25 

Graduation fee $30 

Special guidance and advisory fee 

(pre-college) $10 to $25 

Special examinations in any 

department $15 

(there is a $10 charge for each credit 

hour awarded by examination) 

Key deposit for dormitories $5 

(refunded if key is returned) 

Linen key deposit $5 

(refunded if key is returned) 

Infirmary charge per day $5 

(after the first three days each semester) 

Late registration $3 

(per day) 

Automobile Registration $10 



30 



Art Fees 




Art 105 


$15 


Art 110 


$15 


Art210 


$15 


Art 303 


$15 


Art 304 


$15 


Art 310 


$15 


Art 320 


$5 


Art 325 


$20 


Art 404 


$10 


Art 425 


$20 


Art fees will also be required for 




independent study and studio courses 


where departmental materials are 


being 


used. 





Music Fees 

Private lessons, two weekly 

$115 per semester 
Private lesson, one weekly 

$65 per semester 
Organ Practice, one hour daily 

$33 per semester 
Instrument Rental 

$9 per semester 
Piano Practice, one hour daily 

$9 per semester 
Voice Practice, one or two hours daily 

$9 per semester 

Breakage Deposits 

Chemistry and physics breakage 
deposits are covered by a $5 breakage 
card which the student purchases each 
semester for every laboratory course in 
which he or she is enrolled. In the event 
breakage exceeds $5, an additional $5 
breakage card must be purchased. 
Unused portions are refunded at the 
end of each academic year. 



Payment of Student 
Accounts 

At registration an invoice is prepared 
for each student, listing all charges due 
for the following semester. Payments 
are due in accordance with the 
following schedule: 

First Semester 

By August 15 a payment of $1,500. 
(Balance on account due October 15) 

Second Semester 

By January 15 a payment of $1,500. 
[Balance on account due March 15) 

Scholarships and loans may be applied 
as credit against August or January 
initial payment requirements. If after 
application of scholarships and/or loans, 
the balance is less than $1,500, the full 
balance is due and payable by August 15 
for the first semester and January 15 
for the second semester. All special 
student accounts for which total 
semester charges are $1,500 or less are 
payable in full by registration. 

Students will not be permitted to 
register if the initial payment 
requirements for each semester are not 
met, and they may be denied College 
privileges if subsequent payments are 
not completed as scheduled. These 
requirements are in addition to the 
registration deposit. Checks or drafts 
should be made payable to Bethany 
College. 

Bethany College bills for tuition, fees, 
room and board -twice yearly; other 
charges are billed as incurred. Twice 
yearly billings are payable in advance 
by August 15 and January 15 for the fall 
and spring semesters respectively. 
Charges for the fall semester which 
remain unpaid after October 15, and 



charges for the spring semester which 
remain unpaid after March 15 will be 
subject to service charges as per the 
schedule below: 

Accounts past due - up to $500 - 12% 
per year (1% per month) based on the 
balance outstanding the 25th of each 
month. 

Charges over $500 - 18% per year 
(1V2% per month) based on the balance 
outstanding the 25th of each month. All 
payments will be credited to the oldest 
charge. 

Students may not take final 
examinations, receive academic credit, 
obtain transcripts or graduate until 
satisfactory arrangements are made to 
cover financial obligations. 

Student Drawing 
Account 

The Business Office provides a limited 
banking service whereby students may 
deposit funds and draw on them as 
required. Students or their parents may 
make deposits to this recommended 
student drawing account which avoids 
the necessity of keeping on hand any 
substantial amount of money. All checks 
for this account must be made payable 
to the Bethany College Student 
Drawing Account. 

Monthly Payment 
Plans 

Bethany has made arrangements with 
the Insured Tuition Payment Plan 
whereby student accounts may be paid 
on a monthly basis during the year. 
Arrangements to use this plan should 
be made prior to the registration 
period. Information may be obtained by 
writing to the Business Office, and 
contract forms may be obtained by 
writing to the Insured Tuition Payment 
Plan, 53 Beacon St., Boston, Mass. 
02108. Contracts are to be completed by 
the parent or guardian of the student 
through direct negotiation with the 
payment plan office. Several other 
plans are also available. Contact the 
business manager. 



Financial Aid 

Bethany believes that funding of a 
student's education is primarily a family 
responsibility. However, financial 
assistance is available to those students 
whose resources will not fund a 
Bethany education and yet sincerely 
desire to attend. 

All of the College's financial assistance 
programs are awarded through careful 
evaluation of the Financial Aid Form 
(FAF), available through the college 
counseling offices of the student's high 
school. Designation of Bethany College 
as an appropriate institution to receive 
the processed information and 
indication of application for financial 
assistance on the admission application 
are the only procedures necessary to 
apply for financial aid. 

Because of the large number of 
applications for financial aid, 
assignment of funds is made according 
to the date requests are processed. The 
earlier a student completes all 
admission materials and submits the 
FAF, the faster the student will be 
awarded financial aid. However, the 
FAF should not be submitted until after 
January 1 since it also serves as an 
application for the Basic Educational 
Opportunity Grant Program. 



31 



A financial-aid applicant whose need for 
assistance has been verified by the 
College Scholarship Service will have 
his or her need met through a variety of 
financial aids, including scholarships, 
grants, loans, and College employment. 
The student has the option of accepting 
any or all of the aid offered. An 
interview with an officer of the College 
once the offer of assistance has been 
made can help to explain any problems. 
The Admission Office or the Financial 
Aid Office helps to arrange these 
interviews. 

Qualifications for 
Scholarships 

Bethany recognizes promise and 
intellectual attainment by awarding a 
number of scholarships. These awards 
vary in value and are available to a 
limited number of entering students. 
Most scholarships are awarded to 
freshmen on a four-year basis but are 
continued from year to year, as needed, 
only if the recipient has met the 
following conditions: 

1) A satisfactory scholarship index 

2) Satisfactory conduct as a student 

3) Worthwhile contributions to the 
college program 

4) Constructive citizenship in the college 
community 

5) Payment of student accounts as 
scheduled 



Scholarships 

All awards are made by the Scholarship 
and Financial Aid Committee in 
accordance with the requirements of 
the particular endowed fund. 

Rob Roy A lexander Scholarship - established 
to provide one or more scholarships for 
worthy and needy men and women, to be 
selected by the president. 

Patrick A. and Elizabeth Berry Scholarship 
-established by Miss Sara Cameron to 
assist students from Ohio. 

Bethany Women's Club Scholarship - 
established by the Bethany Women's Club to 
assist needy and worthy students. 

Bison Club Scholarship - provided by 
Bethany alumni with principal interest in 
intercollegiate athletics. 

Stanley F. Bittner Scholarship - established 
by a graduate of the Class of 1916 to provide 
general financial assistance. 

Ashley G. Booth Memorial Scholarship - 
provided by friends of Ashley G. Booth, 
minister of the Christian Church. 

Donald L. Boyd Memorial Scholarship - 
established by family and friends in memory 
of Donald L. Boyd, member of the Class of 
1921 and long-time trustee of the College. 

Jean A. Boyd Scholarship - established by 
bequest from donor. 

Thomas J. Boyd Scholarship - established 
by Thomas J. Boyd, member of the Class of 
1940. 

James B. Brennen III Scholarship - 
established by the Will of Virginia Barton 
Brennen as a memorial for her son. 

Jonsie Brink Scholarship - awarded to 
worthy and eligible students. 

Isaac Brown Scholarship - used to cover 
part of the tuition charge. 

Calder Scholarship - established preferably 
for male students from the New England 
area majoring in one of the natural or life 
sciences. 

Argyle Campbell Memorial Scholarship - 
established by family and friends of Mr. 
Campbell to assist worthy and needy 
students. 



Chapman Scholarship - established by 
Stanton C. Crawford, a member of the class 
of 1918 and former Chancellor of the 
University of Pittsburgh, to honor a pioneer 
frontier family. 

Charnock Family Scholarship - established 
by Miss Ethel Charnock, member of the 
Class of 1912, to assist students at the 
sophomore level or above. 

Class of 1969 Scholarship - provided as a 
scholarship grant to begin with the 1984-85 
college year. First preference will be given 
to descendants of the Class of 1969. 

Class of 1970 Scholarship - provided as a 
scholarship grant to begin with the 1985-86 
college year. First preference will be given 
to descendants of the Class of 1970. 

M. M. Cochran Scholarship - established to 
cover a part of the tuition charge. 

James W. Carty, Jr. Scholarship - 
established by Carl A. Krumbach, a member 
of the class of 1973, to aid worthy students 
interested in journalism. 

Juanita R. Curran Scholarship - 
established to provide scholarship assistance 
to worthy students. 

Irene 0. Darnall Scholarship - established 
by Irene 0. Darnell to assist needy and 
worthy students. 

Helen Day Scholarship - awarded to 
members of Zeta Tau Alpha Sorority. 

Marion and Frank Dunn Scholarship - 
established by Frank K. Dunn, former 
Assistant to the President of Bethany 
College, to assist worthy and eligible 
students. 



32 



East Side Christian Church of Denver, 
Colorado, Scholarship - given to provide 
modest matching funds for a student at 
Bethany College. 

Ekas-Evans Scholarship - established by 
Dr. and Mrs. Ward Ekas of Rochester, New 
York, whose daughter, Elizabeth Ellen 
Ekas, was a member of the Class of 1957. 

Newton W. and Bessie Evans Scholarship - 
established by Mr. Newton W. Evans, 
former Bursar and Treasurer of Bethany 
College, to assist worthy students. 

Joe A. Funk II Scholarship - established by 
Bethany alumni and friends of the Funk 
family in memory of a young man who lost 
his life in Viet Nam. 

Samuel George Memorial Scholarship - 
established by bequest from the donor to 
provide one-fourth tuition scholarships to all 
graduates of Brooke (West Virginia) High 
School who qualify for admission. 

Greensburg Area Scholarship - established 
anonymously in 1953 to assist students of 
ability and need from the Greensburg, 
Pennsylvania, area. 

AleeceC. Gresham Scholarship - presented 
as assistance to outstanding students in the 
field of music. 

Perry and Aleece Gresham Scholarship — 
established by Dr. and Mrs. Perry E. 
Gresham to assist worthy and eligible 
students. Special consideration is given to 
young people interested in music or 
philosophy. 




Campbell A lien Harlan Scholarship - 
established by Mr. Campbell Allen Harlan, 
former Bethany College Trustee from 
Detroit, Michigan, to assist students of 
unusual ability in the fine arts. 

Florence M. Hoagland Memorial 
Scholarship - established for needy and 
worthy students by Miss Frances Cables of 
New Hampshire in memory of Florence M. 
Hoagland, Head of the Department of 
English and Advisor for Women at Bethany 
from 1936 to 1946. 

Home Family Scholarship Endowment - 
The Home Family Scholarship Endowment 
will provide assistance each year for a 
student of the Wheeling area preparing for a 
career in business. 

Ida M. Irvin Scholarship - awarded to a 
senior student. 

Flora Isenberg Scholarship - given to 
provide assistance for students of the liberal 
arts and sciences. 

A Ibert C. Israel Scholarship - used to apply 
to tuition of a descendant of Albert C. Israel. 

Kennedy-Jones Scholarship - provided by 
Violet Kennedy-Jones in honor of her family. 

John H. and Ida H. King Scholarship - 
awarded to students under terms approved 
by Trustees of the College in accordance 
with the will of the donors. 



George A. Kmley Scholarship - provided to 
assist worthy West Virginians. 

Forrest H. Kirkpatrick Scholarship - 
established by Dr. Kirkpatrick, member of 
the Class of 1927, to be used to help students 
who are sons or daughters of alumni. Dr. 
Kirkpatrick was a Bethany professor and 
dean for many years. 

Donald E. Lewis Memorial Scholarship - 
established by family, friends, and the Beta 
Beta Chapter of Kappa Alpha Order in 
memory of a graduate of the class of 1933. 

Robert N. "Buzz" Lewis, Jr., Memorial 
Scholarship Endowment - established by 
parents and friends of Robert N. "Buzz" 
Lewis '79, with priority for the utilization of 
the scholarship funds for his fraternity 
brothers in Sigma Alpha Epsilon. 

Emma A. Lyon Scholarship - given to 
memorialize a pioneer Christian missionary 
to China. The endowment was initiated by a 
gift from Mrs. Mary M. Farm of Hawaii. 

Maude Schultz Lytle Scholarship - 
established by friends and family in memory 
of a graduate of the Class of 1915. 

Janet Noll McCready Scholarship - 
established by Donald F. McCready, the 
husband of the late Janet Noll McCready to 
provide financial assistance to worthy 
students. 



33 



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Charles L. and Rose Melenyzer Scholarship 

- established by Dr. Charles Melenyzer, 
member of the National Board of Fellows of 
Bethany College, to be used to assist worthy 
young people who attend Bethany. First 
consideration will be given to the young 
people of the Monongahela Valley. 

H. J. Morlan Scholarship - established by 
Halford J. Morlan to assist needy and 
worthy students. 

Louise Birch Myers Scholarship - used to 
promote international, intellectual, and 
cultural understanding through the support 
of scholarships for exchange students. 

William Kimbrough Pendleton Scholarship 

- established to assist students from West 
Virginia by Clarinda Pendleton Lamar in 
memory of her father, William Kimbrough 
Pendleton, member of the first faculty and 
second president of the College. 

Ralph E. Pryor Memorial Scholarship - 
established by family and friends of Judge 
Pryor, a member of the Class of 1942, with 
preference for students from the First 
Judicial Circuit of West Virginia. 

Eli and Lee Rabb Scholarship - used as 
scholarship assistance for students from the 
Upper Ohio Valley. 

Reader's Digest Foundation Scholarship - 
established by the Reader's Digest 
Foundation to assist worthy and needy 
students. 

Herbert and Marguerite Rech Scholarship - 
used to assist needy and eligible students. 

Renner Honor Scholarships - An endowed 
scholarship program funded by the Renner 
Foundation of Cleveland, Ohio, in honor of 
Bethany graduates R. Richard Renner, 
M.D., '17, and his wife, Jennie Steindorf 
Renner, '22, to recognize exceptionally able 
students for their outstanding achievement. 

Edwin K. Resseger, Jr. Memorial 
Scholarship - provided by Mr. and Mrs. 
Kenneth Resseger of the Class of 1933. 

James Derrick Reynolds Memorial 
Scholarship - established by parents and 
friends of a young man who lost his life in 
Viet Nam. 

E. E. Roberts Scholarship - created in 
memory of Professor E. E. Roberts who 
taught journalism at Bethany College from 
1928-1960. 



Louise Ford Rowan Scholarship - 
established in her memory by her son, 
Archibald H. Rowan of Texas, to provide 
financial assistance for a woman student. 

Archibald H. Rowan, Jr. Memorial 
Scholarship - established by Archibald H. 
Rowan of Texas, in memory of his only son. 
It is awarded annually to a male student. 

James J. Sawtell Scholarship Endowment - 
the income to be used each year to support a 
deserving student seeking an education. 

Richard B. Scandrett, Jr., Scholarship - 
established for the purpose of furthering 
international education and understanding. 

Richard L. Schanck Scholarship - 
established by friends in memory of Dr. 
Schanck, Professor of Sociology at Bethany 
College from 1952-1964. 

Elizabeth M. Schrontz Scholarship - 
established by bequest from the estate of 
Elizabeth Schrontz from Washington, 
Pennsylvania. 

Richard H. Slavin, Jr., Memorial 
Scholarship - given in memory of a 
graduate of the Class of 1950 who served as 
a Bethany faculty member from 1956-63. 

Paul Smyth Memorial Scholarship 
Endowment - established by his wife, Sue 
Culbert Smyth, '68, and parents Mr. and 
Mrs. John H. Smyth, and friends, in memory 
of Paul Smyth '68, who gave his life in 
service to country. 

Adelaide E. and Arthur C. Stifel 
Scholarship - established by Mr. and Mrs. 
Arthur C. Stifel of Wheeling, West Virginia. 



34 



Peter Tarr Heritage Scholarship - 
established by Geneva Tarr Elliott, member 
of the Class of 1927, to provide scholarship 
assistance to students in memory of the Tarr 
family's association with Bethany College 
since the days of its founding. 

Russell I. Todd Scholarship - a general 
scholarship endowment with preference for 
students planning to enter a health 
associated career. 

Stewart King Tweedy Memorial Scholarship 
- established by Mr. and Mrs. H. L. Tweedy 
and friends in memory of their son, member 
of the Class of 1964, who was killed in 
Viet Nam. 

W. W. Vines Scholarship Endowment - 
provided by a business associate of W. W. 
Vines, S. John Nitta, the income to be used 
each year to support a deserving student 
seeking an education. 

William H. Vodrey Scholarship - 
established by Mr. William H. Vodrey, a 
member of the Class of 1894, to assist 
students from the East Liverpool, Ohio, 
area. 

Nannine Clay Wallis Scholarship - given to 
provide financial assistance for students, 
preferably from Kentucky, enrolled at 
Bethany. 

Campbell-Hagerman-Watson Memorial 
Scholarship - established by a bequest from 
the estate of Mrs. Virginia Hagerman 
Watson, a member of the Class of 1904, to 
provide support for foreign exchange 
students. 

G. A. Willett Scholarship - established to 
cover part of the tuition charge. The student 
receiving this scholarship is to be nominated 
by a member of the Willett family. 



Designated 
Scholarships 

The following endowment scholarship 
funds have been established to assist 
students preparing for church-related 
vocations: 

Florence Abercrombie Scholarship - 
established by a bequest from the estate of 
Florence Abercrombie. 

Ada P. Bennett Memorial Scholarship - 
established by 0. E. Bennett, a member of 
the Class of 1925, and family and friends. 

Osborne Booth Scholarship - named after a 
long-time member of the Bethany faculty to 
provide financial assistance for students 
preparing for the ministry. 

Brightwood Christian Church Timothy 
Scholarship - established by members of 
the Brightwood Christian Church, Bethel 
Park, Pennsylvania. 

LottaA. Calkins Scholarship - established 
by a bequest from the estate of Lotta A. 
Calkins. 

Thomas Richard Deming Scholarship - 
established by friends, family, and members 
of the First Christian Church, Charleston, 
West Virginia. 

Elliott Family Memorial Scholarship Fund 
- established by Virgil and Geneva Elliott 
in honor of his mother and father, P. W. 
Elliott and Ella May Morse Elliott, and his 
brother, Victor Douglas Elliott. The purpose 
of the fund is to provide financial aid to 
ministerial students participating in varsity 
athletics. 

Fairhill Manor Christian Church Timothy 
Scholarship - established by the 
Washington, Pennsylvania, congregation. 

Jennie I. Hayes Scholarship - established 
by Jennie I. Hayes, a member of the Class of 
1904. 

Harry L. and Eva Ice Timothy Ministerial 
Scholarship - established by Mr. and Mrs. 
Robert H. Lee of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, 
honoring Dr. and Mrs. Ice in recognition of 
Dr. Ice's productive and untiring work in 
establishing and building Bethany's Timothy 
Ministerial Training Program. 



William H. McKinney Scholarship - 
established by family and friends in memory 
of a Bethany graduate of the Class of 1923 
to provide assistance for students preparing 
for church vocations. 

Isaac Mills Scholarship - provided to cover 
part of the tuition charge of a ministerial 
student. 

Herbert Moninger Scholarship - established 
in memory of Mr. Herbert Moninger, a 
graduate of the Class of 1898. 

Edward S. and Ruthella Hukill Moreland 
Scholarship - provided by members of the 
Walnut Hills Christian Church, Cincinnati, 
Ohio, and friends of an outstanding Disciple 
leader who was graduated from Bethany 
College in 1927. 

Mr. and Mrs. Arch R. Morgan Scholarship 

- established by these friends of Bethany 
College from Seattle, Washington. 

Parsons Memorial Timothy Scholarship - 
established by the Heights Christian Church, 
Shaker Heights, Ohio, and friends in 
memory of Dorothy and Waymon Parsons 
for dedicated leadership to this church and 
Brotherhood of Christian Churches 
(Disciples of Christ). 

E. J. and Imogene Penhorwood Scholarship 

- named for a Bethany graduate of the 
Class of 1918 to provide assistance for 
students preparing for the ministry. 

Perry Scholarship - established in memory 
of Professor and Mrs. E. Lee Perry. 
Professor Perry was a member of the Class 
of 1893, Professor of Latin at the College 
from 1908 to 1939, and Professor Emeritus 
from 1939 to 1948. 



35 



Reed-Law Ministerial Scholarship 
Endowment - provided by the Christian 
Church of Plymouth, Pennsylvania, in 
memory of the Reed family and Dr. Marjorie 
Reed Law, long-time members of that 
congregation. 

Rosemary Roberts Memorial Scholarship - 
established by family and friends in memory 
of a Bethany graduate of the Class of 1942 
to provide assistance for a woman preparing 
for Christian service. 

Sala Family Memorial Scholarship - 
established by Dr. John R. Sala, Class of 
1926, former Dean of the Faculty at Bethany 
College. 

Minnie W. Schaefer Scholarship - awarded 
to students preparing for Christian service. 

Edith and Chester A. Sillars Scholarship - 
established by Chester A. Sillars, former 
Director of Church Relations at Bethany 
College. 

Charles C. Smith Scholarship - established 
by family and friends in memory of Mr. and 
Mrs. C. C. Smith whose lives were dedicated 
to the Christian ministry. 

J. T. Smith Scholarship - established by Mr. 
J. T. Smith, friend of Bethany from 
Memphis, Tennessee. 

John E. Sugden, Jr. Fund - established to 
assist in the form of either loans or grants. 

Harriett Mortimore Toomey and John M. 
Toomey Scholarship - established by John 
C. Toomey and friends to assist students in 
musical education. 



Robert S. and Marie J. Tuck Scholarship - 
established by members of the Central 
Christian Church, Wooster, Ohio, where the 
Tucks, both Bethany graduates, served for 
44 years. 

Hollis L. Turley Scholarship - established 
by a bequest from the estate of Hollis L. 
Turley, a member of the Class of 1925 and 
former Bethany trustee. 

Vinson Memorial Scholarship - established 
by Z. T. Vinson, Class of 1878, through the 
Central Christian Church, Huntington, West 
Virginia. 

Raymond E. and Eunice M. Weed 
Scholarship - established by Dr. Raymond 
Weed, former curator of the Campbell 
Mansion near Bethany. 

Josiah N. and Wilminia S. Wilson 
Scholarship - established by Josiah N. 
Wilson to assist students preparing for the 
Christian ministry. 

The following endowed scholarship 
funds have been established to assist 
students from backgrounds of the 
Christian Church (Disciples of Christ): 

Fannie M. Bennett National Campbell 
Scholarship - established by a gift from the 
estate of Fannie Bennett who was a member 
of the Class of 1926. 

Ben and Leona Brown Scholarship - 
established by Mrs. Leona Brown of 
Washington, Pennsylvania, in memory of her 
husband. 

Jessie M. and Frank P. Fiess National 
Campbell Scholarship - established by Mr. 
and Mrs. Frank P. Fiess whose daughters, 
June Fiess Shackelford, Emma Lee Fiess 
Baldwin, and Frances Fiess Caldwell, were 
members of the Classes of 1941, 1944, and 
1959, respectively. 

V. J. Hopkins and Mary L. Hopkins 
Scholarship - operated under the principles 
of the National Campbell Scholarship 
program. 

National Campbell Scholarships - 
established in memory and honor of 
Alexander Campbell for the purpose of 
developing able and dedicated lay leadership 
in the Christian Church. Awards are in 
recognition of Christian service and 
academic accomplishment. 




36 



Richmond Avenue Christian Church of 
Buffalo Scholarship - established for 
students enrolled at Bethany from Western 
New York and preferably of Disciple 
background. 

Webster Groves Christian Church 
Scholarship - designed to provide financial 
assistance for students coming from the 
Christian Church (Disciples of Christ), 
preferably from Missouri. This scholarship 
was established in honor of Dr. Perry E. 
Gresham, twelfth president of Bethany 
College, and his wife, Aleece. 

External Thist 
Scholarships 

Through trust funds established in 
major banking houses, the following 
scholarship awards are available: 

Nelson Evans Cook Scholarship - created to 
memorialize an outstanding metallurgist by 
providing financial assistance for chemistry 
students. 

Catherine Graves Scholarship - given to a 
Bethany student from Wheeling, W. Va., in 
accordance with an educational trust fund 
established in the Pittsburgh National Bank. 

Hayes Picklesimer Scholarship - 
established by the West Virginia Emulation 
Endowment Trust to provide scholarship 
help for residents of West Virginia. 

William A. Stanley Scholarship - 
established by an outstanding West Virginia 
churchman who had lengthy careers in both 
education and business. 

Peter T. Whitaker Scholarship - created by 
a young graduate who found at Bethany the 
kind of education he sought. 



Sustained Awards 

A limited number of financial grants 
are available from the following 
annually sustained programs: 

H. L. Berkman Foundation Scholarship - 
provides an award for one or more students 
residing in the Upper Ohio Valley. 

A. Dale Fiers Ministerial Athletic 
Scholarship - awarded to recognize and 
encourage the scholastic and athletic skill of 
an outstanding upperclassman preparing for 
the Christian ministry. 

Scripps Howard Foundation Scholarship - 
provides assistance to journalism majors. 

Loan Funds 

The following loan funds have been 
established to assist students under the 
general supervision of the Scholarship 
and Financial Aid Committee: 

William G. and Carrie E. Bunyan Student 
Aid Fund - established by a bequest from 
the estate of the late Mrs. Bunyan of 
Brockway, Pennsylvania. 

Carman Loan Fund - established in honor 
of Martha Cox Carman of the Class of 1916 
and Forrest A. Carman of the Class of 1914 
by their son, Donald C. Carman. 

Charles N. and Edna Scott Jarrett Memorial 
Ministerial Loan Fund - established by 
their sons, friends and relatives to provide 
assistance for preministerial students. 

Merit and Marguertie May Student Loan 
Fund - established by Mr. and Mrs. Meril 
May of Garrettsville, Ohio. 

J. West Mitchell Medical Loan Fund - 
provided to assist premedical 
undergraduates and Bethany graduates 
enrolled in accredited medical schools. 

Phillips Loan Fund - established in 1890 by 
Thomas W. Phillips, St., of New Castle, 
Pennsylvania. 

Renner-Steindorf Student Loan Fund - 
established by Dr. R. R. Renner and his wife, 
Jennie Steindorf Renner, of Cleveland, Ohio. 

Ethel E. Sivon Student Loan Fund - 
established by family, friends, and members 
of the First Christian Church of Ravenna, 
Ohio. 




37 



m *.jt •** 




Academic 
Program 

The Bethany Plan 

Thoroughly based in the liberal arts 
tradition, the Bethany Plan is designed 
to help students develop the capacities 
to be intelligent, useful, free, and 
responsible persons. Its aim is to meet 
the educational needs of the individual 
while insuring breadth, depth, and 
integration of knowledge. 

The Plan recognizes that each person is 
unique, possessing goals and interests 
that are different from others. 
Consequently, a rich variety of learning 
opportunities are provided as options 
from which the student may choose. 
These include classroom-based and out- 
of-class programs ranging from 
seminars, lecture courses, independent 
studies, and laboratories to competitive 
sports, musical and dramatic 
productions, and student government 
(to name but a few). Many off -campus 
activities are also available, including 
study abroad. 




These learning opportunities are set 
within a framework of educational goals 
and programs which are organized to 
provide direction and guidance as well 
as independence and choice. The 
learning goals of the college are clearly 
stated (see page 6) and govern all 
aspects of education at Bethany. 

The Bethany Plan also includes an 
experience-based program, a group of 
four practicums which encourages 
students to become involved in the 
world of work, to exercise responsible 
citizenship, to develop physical and 
recreational skills, and to experience 
living in a culture different from their 
own. 



These learning opportunities are not 
random experiences. They are carefully 
planned by the student and his or her 
advisor. Students must continually 
justify their decisions and examine their 
academic and field experiences in 
relationship to their vocational and 
personal goals. 



39 




Academic Calendar Academic Advisor 



The Bethany calendar consists of two 
15-week semesters and a four-week 
voluntary interim session in January: 
The Fall semester - September to 
before Christmas; the Spring semester 
- February to the end of May; and the 
January Term - a voluntary session 
which students may elect to use for 
intensive study on campus or for off- 
campus work. 

Some courses are offered over the full 
15 weeks; others, for the first or second 
half of the semester. This division 
provides additional flexibility for 
students to do off-campus study and 
internships. 



The student/advisor relationship is the 
cornerstone of a Bethany education. 
The student and his or her advisor work 
together to develop appropriate 
classroom and experience-based 
programs. If not during private 
meetings, freshmen see their advisor 
two times a week during the first 
semester to discuss work in the 
freshman seminar. 

Usually during the sophomore year, 
students select a major field of 
concentration, thus transferring to an 
advisor associated with their major area 
of interest. 

Policy Appeals 
Board 

The faculty members who sit on the 
Policy Appeals Board evaluate student 
requests for exceptions to regular 
academic policies and regulations. 
Student requests are submitted in 
writing and should include the advisor's 
recommendation. 



Requirements for 
Graduation 

The Bachelor of Arts degree is 
conferred upon the student who 
satisfactorily completes the following 
requirements: 

1) 128 semester hours with a minimum 
cumulative grade point average of 2.0 

2) a freshman seminar 

3) a freshman interdisciplinary lecture 
course 

4) the distribution requirement 

5) a field of concentration 

6) demonstrated proficiency in 
expository writing 

7) a senior project 

8) the comprehensive examination in 
the major field 

9) the practicum requirement 

10) the residence requirement 

11) attendance at the commencement 
exercise 

The degree of Bachelor of Science may 
be conferred upon a student who 
completes the Bachelor of Arts 
requirements and who chooses to major 
in any one of the following 
departments: biology, chemistry, 
mathematics, physics, or psychology 
(B.S. plan). 

Freshman Studies 



Program 



Freshman Seminar: All entering 
freshmen enroll in a freshman seminar 
during the fall semester of the 
freshman year. The professor directing 
the seminar also serves as the student's 
advisor. 



40 



Freshman Interdisciplinary Course: 
Freshmen elect a freshman 
interdisciplinary course in the spring 
semester of the freshman year. 

For descriptions of the courses offered 
in this program see pages 51-52. 

Practicum Program 

The practicum program is a progressive 
effort to make a student's academic 
studies more relevant to the everyday 
world. The practicums are practical 
experiences encompassing values 
Bethany believes to be essential to a 
complete education. 

Students complete four practicums in a 
non-classroom setting in which they 
actualize the goals of the College. These 
four practicums are (1) an example of 
responsible citizenship, (2) an 
awareness and involvement in health, 
physical education and recreation, 
(3) an intercultural living experience, 
and (4) a vocationally oriented 
placement. The successful completion of 
the four practicums is required for 
graduation. 

Each practicum experience should be a 
self-examination of values related to 
that practicum; a demonstration that 
liberal studies are relevant to personal 
development and to the fulfillment of 
obligations as a citizen. 

With the assistance of the student's 
advisor and the director of practicums, 
the student develops practicum 
proposals. These proposals must have 



the approval of a faculty member and 
meet the guidelines established for each 
practicum. After each practicum, the 
student completes an evaluation of the 
experience. 

The development of meaningful 
practicum experiences is an important 
part of the academic program, and the 
College is committed to providing 
competent counseling and assistance to 
the students. 

Seniors must fulfill all proposals by 
February 10 and all evaluations by April 
15 of the graduation year. 

Further information concerning the 
practicum program may be obtained by 
contacting the director of practicums. 

Distribution 
Requirement 

To insure breadth of knowledge among 
its graduates, Bethany requires a 
demonstration of competence in a 
variety of disciplines. 

Every student must elect at least 12 
hours from each of the three following 
divisions: 

Social Sciences 

Communications 101, 402; Economics; 
Education 201, 202, 401; History; 
Political Science; Social Science; and 
Sociology. 

Physical and Life Sciences 

Biology; Chemistry; General Science 
100, 101, 201, 202, 209, 210, 211; 
Mathematics; Physics; and Psychology. 

Humanities 

Art; Communications 206; Fine Arts; 
Foreign Languages; Literature; Music; 
Philosophy; Religious Studies; and 
Theatre. Not more than four hours may 
be earned in applied fine arts courses. 

All courses taken to satisfy distribution 
and field of concentration requirements 
must be taken on a graded basis. 

Any student may be exempted from the 
distribution requirement in any one of 
the three divisions through successful 
completion of the Undergraduate 




Record Examination by the end of the 
sophomore year with a score equal to or 
surpassing the national norm. 

All students are required to pass 
Religious Studies 100. Generally, this 
course is taken in the freshman or 
sophomore year. This course may be 
used to fulfill part of the distribution 
requirement in humanities. 



41 



Field of 
Concentration 

The field of concentration may be either 
departmental or faculty-student 
initiated. The following guidelines 
specifically exclude any language 
requirements necessary for professional 
certification or for admission to a 
graduate program. 

A departmental field consists of a 
minimum of 24 credit hours (excluding 
the senior project) and a maximum of 
48 hours within the department. No 
more than 24 hours from related 
disciplines may be required by a 
department. 

The faculty-sponsored or student- 
initiated field, which may cut across 
departmental lines, may be developed. 
This interdisciplinary field of 
concentration requires the approval of 
the Committee on Interdisciplinary 
Study. Such fields consist of a minimum 
of 24 hours (excluding the senior 
project) and a maximum of 72 hours. 
No more than 48 hours in any one 
department will be counted toward 
graduation. Examples of faculty- 
sponsored programs approved by the 
Committee on Interdisciplinary Study 
include a Mathematics-Physics program 
for pre-engineering and a Sports- 
Communications program. The 
interdisciplinary studies program is 
described on page 93. 



Writing Proficiency 
Requirement 

All students must achieve and maintain 
an above-average level of proficiency in 
expository writing. They may do this 
either by taking the annual Writing 
Qualification Test or by satisfactory 
completion of selected writing courses 
offered by the English Department. 

Students who choose to satisfy the 
requirement by enrolling in writing 
courses may do so by electing from the 
following: English 101-109, 120, 125, 
140, 150, 200, 205, 210, 213, or 351. No 
more than one course per academic 
year will apply to the requirement. See 
below for the number of courses needed 
to satisfy the writing proficiency 
requirement. 

The Department of English will certify 
to the Registrar that a student has 
satisfied the writing proficiency 
requirement for graduation when 
proficiency has been demonstrated in 
one of the following ways: 

1. By achieving a high level of 
proficiency on both the first Writing 
Qualification Test, taken in November 
of the freshman year, and the second 
Writing Qualification Test, taken in 
April of the sophomore year; or by 
achieving a grade of C + or better in a 
writing course taken instead of either 
or both of these tests. A student whose 
proficiency is certified in this way is 
not required to take additional tests or 
courses. 

2. By taking the first Writing 
Qualification Test in November of the 
freshman year and achieving a high 
level of proficiency on the third test, 
taken in April of the junior year. 

Students who have not met the writing 
proficiency requirement before the 
beginning of their seventh semester must 
enroll in English 120, a non-credit, non- 



graded course in expository writing. 
Special Writing Qualification Tests are 
given as part of this course, and 
students must continue in the course 
until they have achieved a high level of 
proficiency on one of the special tests. 
Special Writing Qualification Tests are 
given to seniors only when enrolled in 
the course. 

Special arrangements are made for 
students who transfer from other 
colleges. Transfer students should 
consult the Department of English 
immediately upon enrolling at Bethany. 

Additional information about the 
Writing Qualification Tests and courses 
may be found on page 77. 

Senior Project 

Every student must produce a project 
which meets the standards of his or her 
field of concentration. The project is 
received and evaluated during the final 
semester of the senior year. Two to 
eight hours of credit are given after the 
final evaluation and approval of the 
project. Scheduling of the project is at 
the discretion of the department or the 
student's advisory committee. 

The project is evaluated by at least one 
person in the field of concentration 
other than the student's advisor(s). The 
final evaluation is made in consultation 
with the student. The project is made 
available to the College community. 



42 



Senior 

Comprehensive 

Examination 

Each student must pass the Senior 
Comprehensive Examination. All 
requirements in the field of 
concentration must be met and the 
student must have senior standing and 
a 2. cumulative average in the field of 
concentration before the examination 
may be taken. 

The examination consists of two parts, 
written and oral. In some departments, 
sections of the Undergraduate Record 
Examination may also be considered 
part of or prerequisite to the Senior 
Comprehensive. 



The examination is given twice yearly, 
in January and in May. The oral part of 
the examination is scheduled by the 
registrar as soon as practicable after 
the written, but in no case more than 
two weeks later. 

Seniors who have completed all the 
requirements in their field of 
concentration may take the 
examination in January with the 
consent of their advisor(s). 

Students failing the examination may 
take it again in May. 

Students in departments which consider 
sections of the Undergraduate or 
Graduate Record Examination as part 
of the Senior Comprehensive 
Examination take the URE or GRE 
immediately preceding their written 
and oral examinations. 




Students who fail the examination may 
take it at any time it is regularly given 
within the following 12 months. If they 
fail a second time, they may petition the 
faculty for a re-examination during the 
following year. No student may take the 
examination more than three times. 

Policy on Work 
Internships 

A student may spend a semester 
combining practical professional 
experience with formal off-campus 
study. A student wishing to do this 
must arrange a full-time job in his or 
her chosen area and arrange 
independent study integrating this 
work experience with formal theoretical 
study. 

A written proposal, signed by the 
department in which the student 
intends to earn academic credit, must 
be submitted to the Curriculum Review 
Board of the College. This proposal 
must also be signed by the faculty 
member charged with supervising and 
evaluating the project. The proposal 
must include a description of the 
student's goals in undertaking the 
program, a description of the 
experience that includes a summary of 
his or her responsibilities and the name 
of his or her supervisor, a description of 
the formal independent study course 
work, an explanation of the way in 
which the program relates the work 
experience and the formal independent 
study course work, and a description of 
the methods to be used in supervising 
and evaluating the entire project. 

Eight credit-hours will be awarded for 
satisfactory completion of the project. 
No additional academic work may be 
taken during the semester of the 
project. 



43 



Residence 
Requirement 

Four years are usually required to 
satisfy the course and residence 
requirements for the baccalaureate 
degree. Students of superior ability 
may complete the requirements in less 
time. As a rule, the senior year or the 
last two semesters are to be spent in 
residence at the College. However, 
students who have had one full year of 
residence previous to their senior year, 
and who apply for and are approved by 
the Policy Appeals Board for off- 
campus study programs during their 
senior year, are permitted to count that 
work toward graduation requirements. 

Information and guidelines concerning 
specific off -campus programs are given 
in subsequent sections of the catalog. 




Independent Study January Term 



Each department offers independent 
study for those students who have 
demonstrated the ability to work 
individually in some area of special 
interest. The student selects an area of 
study, subject to the approval of the 
head of the department, after which he 
or she completes an Application for 
Independent Study in the Registrar's 
Office before the start of that semester. 



The January Term provides 
opportunities for students to 
supplement and extend the learning 
experiences available during the 
traditional academic year. In January, 
students may participate in 
experimental courses, study single 
topics intensively, travel and study in 
various parts of the world, undertake 
an independent study, or fulfill a 
practicum. 

During January, course offerings at 
other colleges across the country, 
including many foreign and domestic 
travel programs, are open to Bethany 
students through an exchange program. 

Participation in the January Term is 
entirely voluntary. 

Summer Terms 

There are two five-week summer terms 
and an 11-week independent study 
period. Most summer school courses are 
taught as seminars, tutorials, or 
independent studies. For additional 
information, consult with the director 
of the summer school. 



Cooperative U.S. 
Study Offerings 

Academic Common Market 

Bethany is a member of the Academic 
Common Market, an interstate 
agreement among southern states for 
sharing academic programs. This 
agreement allows Bethany students, 
who qualify for admission, to apply for 
enrollment in 80 graduate degree 
programs in other common market 
states on an in-state tuition basis. This 
program is sponsored by the Southern 
Regional Education Board. Further 
information concerning the Academic 
Common Market may be obtained by 
contacting the director of placement. 

Engineering Programs 

Special arrangements have been made 
with Columbia University in New York 
City (The Combined Plan), Georgia 
Institute of Technology in Atlanta 
(Dual-Degree Program), and 
Washington University in St. Louis 
(Three-Two Plan) for students 
interested in becoming professional 
engineers or applied scientists. 

Students participating in one of these 
programs spend three years in the 
liberal arts environment at Bethany 
College and then attend either 
Columbia, Georgia Tech, or Washington 
University for an additional two years. 
The programs permit the student to 
earn both a bachelor's degree from 
Bethany and a B.S. in engineering or 
applied science from the cooperating 
engineering school upon completion of 
the five-year sequence. 

The broad educational experience 
gained at Bethany and the engineering 
school is aimed at producing engineers 
and applied scientists who are better 
prepared to meet the social, political, 
economic, and environmental problems 
of today's world. 



44 




Entering freshmen who are interested 
in this program should select the 
appropriate level calculus course and 
either Chemistry 101 or Physics 201, 
depending on their career interest. This 
will allow for maximum freedom in 
course selection and career choice in 
subsequent semesters. Interested 
students should consult with the 
engineering advisor at their earliest 
convenience. 



Washington Semester 

Arrangements have been made for one 
or two advanced students in history, 
political science, economics, or 
sociology to pursue studies in these 
fields under the direction of the 
American University in Washington, 
D.C. A student participating in this 
plan takes six to nine hours in regular 
academic work and six to nine hours in 
the study of government supervised by 
Bethany College and American 
University. Participants in the program 
must be recommended by the program 
advisor and have the approval of the 
Dean of the Faculty. 

The Department of Political Science 
and History administers a program in 
conjunction with the West Virginia 
University Foundation in which an 
outstanding junior or senior is selected 
each year to spend one week in 
Charleston studying three branches of 
state government. Two hours of credit 
may be granted for this program. 



Semester at 
Merrill-Palmer Institute 

Cooperative arrangements with Merrill- 
Palmer Institute in Detroit give 
students in appropriate programs the 
opportunity to spend a semester at 
Merrill-Palmer Institute which has 
exemplary facilities for study and first- 
hand experience in various aspects of 
urban social work and counseling. 
Students contemplating a semester at 
Merrill-Palmer should discuss their 
plans with their advisors and with the 
Registrar well ahead of time. No more 
than one semester of credit (16 
semester hours) from Merrill-Palmer 
may be counted toward the Bethany 
degree, and the student must plan to be 
in residence at Bethany during the last 
semester of his or her Senior year. 



45 



Overseas Study 
Offerings 

Under approved supervision and 
direction, qualified students may secure 
credit for formal work completed in 
foreign colleges and universities. To be 
eligible for study abroad, the student 
should normally be a junior and must 
have the approval of the External 
Programs Committee. 

Madrid Study Program 

Under special arrangement with the 
University of Madrid, qualified Bethany 
students may enroll for a semester or 
full year at the university. 

Oxford Semester 

Under this program, approximately 20 
students spend the fall semester in 
Oxford, England, studying British 
literature, history, and culture with a 
Bethany professor. Participants are 
matriculated as full-time students at 
Bethany College, but live and study in 
Britain. 

Paris Sorbonne Program 

Under special arrangement with the 
Sorbonne, qualified Bethany students 
may enroll for a semester or full year in 
its Cours de Langue et de Civilisation 
Francaise. Bethany's official 
representative in Paris serves as 
counselor to Bethany students during 
their stay at the Sorbonne. 



Tubingen Study Program 

Qualified students are given an 
opportunity to do intensive study in the 
German language and to work out an 
individualized program at the 
University of Tubingen, Germany. An 
adjunct member of the Bethany faculty 
serves as mentor. 

Other Overseas Programs 

There are additional overseas programs 
in which Bethany students have 
participated. These include: 

1) Beaver College Semester at the City 
College of London (England) 

2) University of Glasgow, Scotland 

3) American University, Beirut, 
Lebanon 

The coordinator of international 
education programs provides interested 
students with information concerning 
programs which have been examined 
and approved. 

Continuing 
Education Program 

Believing that education is a life-long 
process, Bethany has instituted a non- 
degree, non-traditional program of 
continuing education within the 
framework of the liberal arts tradition 
of the College. The Leadership Center 
for Continuing Education serves as the 
physical setting for the vast majority of 
instructional activities in this program. 

Continuing Education Units (CEUs) are 
awarded (one for every 10 contract 
hours) to participants in the program. 
The Registrar's Office maintains a 
continuing education transcript for each 
participant. 

Most continuing education programs at 
Bethany comprise intensive, short- 
term, residential and off-campus 
seminars, institutes, courses and 
workshops which are aimed at assisting 
people of all ages and backgrounds to 
deal with the complexities of modern 
living. 



Some of the offerings are developed by 
Bethany's faculty and staff while others 
are conducted by a broad spectrum of 
business, industrial, educational, 
professional, and church organizations 
which bring their students and 
educational formats to the Leadership 
Center. 

External Programs 

Bethany College operates a number of 
external programs to meet the 
continuing needs of the community and 
the region. By meeting these needs 
through its external programs, Bethany 
College is able to adjust to change and 
monitor the educational pulse of the 
area. 

Leadership Center 

Leadership Center, Bethany's award 
winning conference center, is first 
choice of the top Fortune 500 
companies for conference and 
management seminars. Current course 
offerings in the Center's Executive 
Development Program include 
"Management," based on United States 
Steel's series, "Engineering Project 
Management," "Processes in Decision 
Making," and "Management Principles." 
Plans call for continued expansion of 
the Executive Development series to 
meet the training needs of area 
business and industry. 

Leadership Center is the only solar- 
powered satellite training site in the 
world. 



46 



Appalachian Community 
Service Network 

By using space-age satellite, Bethany 
College is channeling innovative 
programming in the areas of education, 
business, health, human resources and 
government through its satellite 
receiving site at the College's 
Leadership Center. Ancillary sites are 
at WQED-TV in Pittsburgh and 
Wheeling Antenna Cable Co., and Penn 
State University. 



in Conference. Schools from Ohio, 
Pennsylvania and West Virginia send 
their bands to campus for week-long 
practice and training. Tennis, for both 
juniors and adults, attract hundreds. 
Retreats and performing arts 
workshops are among the activities 
included in summer programming, and 
soccer camps and boys' and girls' sports 
camps round out the summer program 
schedule. 



Policy on 
Cross-Listed 



Both credit and non-credit courses and 

workshops are offered by the 

Appalachian Community Service 

Network (ACSN) by way of a satellite C0UTS6S 

uplink from the University of Kentucky. 

Bethany College is the only private 

college associated with the ACSN and is 

one of the many Appalachian and cable 

sites capable of receiving signals from 

the RCA Satcom I satellite. 



Facilities for the Ohio Valley's ACSN 
main site are located at Bethany 
College's Leadership Center where the 
necessary receiving and audio 
transmitting equipment is maintained. 

Summer Programming 

Each summer, thousands are involved 
in band, tennis and church camps 
conducted on the Bethany College 
campus. More than 2,500 were on 
campus last summer for programs 
which included as many as 500 to 600 
participants and as few as six. Church 
groups from throughout the nation 
spend a few days or more than a week 



When a course which is part of a 
department's requirements for its field 
of concentration is cross-listed, a 
student concentrating in that field may 
register for the course in any 
department in which it is cross-listed, 
but it will count as part of the 
maximum credit which may be earned 
by the student within the department of 
his or her field of concentration. 

Course Load 

A normal semester load is 16 hours. 
However, a student may elect activities 
courses (music, chorus, band, physical 
education) up to two hours with no 
additional fee charge. For example, a 
student could elect a one-hour activity 
course, two one-hour activity courses, 
or a two-hour activity course. Thus, the 
maximum academic course load is 16 
hours plus two hours of activities 
courses. Permission to take additional 
courses must be obtained from the 
Dean of the Faculty. Fees will be 
charged for any such approved courses. 
Applications for excess hours are 
available in the Registrar's Office. A 
full-time student is defined as any 
student carrying at least 12 hours per 
semester. 




47 




Grading System 

Letter grades given and their 
equivalents in quality points are: 



A 


4.00 


A- 


3.75 


B + 


3.25 


B 


3.00 


B- 


2.75 


C + 


2.25 


C 


2.00 


c- 


1.75 


D + 


1.25 


D 


1.00 


D- 


.75 


F 


.00 



Students are required to take at least 
100 hours of letter-graded work. 

Grades mean: A, Superior; B, 
Excellent; C, Average; D, Below 
Average; F, Failure. 



Other report abbreviations and their 
meanings are: 

Cr. Credit. No quality points. 

NCr. No-Credit. No quality points or 
academic penalty. 

F. Failure. No quality points; denotes 
work that is unsatisfactory. 

Inc. Incomplete. Incomplete work is a 
result of sickness or some other 
justifiable reason. An incomplete must 
be removed by the end of the fourth 
week of the following semester, unless 
an extension of time is granted by the 
Dean of the Faculty. It is not possible 
for a student to remove an incomplete 
after 12 months. 

W. Withdrawn. No penalty. 

WF. Withdrawn failing. No quality 
points; indicates a course dropped with 
permission after the fifth week of the 
semester, with the student failing at the 
time of withdrawal. A grade of WF has 
the same effect on the student's grade- 
point average as an F. 

Any student who carries 12 hours of 
letter-graded academic work may elect 
to take additional work on a Credit-No 
Credit basis in courses which are not 
used for the field of concentration or 
the distribution requirement. 

A report of the scholastic standing of 
students is received at the Registrar's 
Office at mid-semester in addition to 
the final semester reports. These 
reports are sent to the faculty advisor 
and the parents or guardians of each 
student. 



Change of Schedule 

During the first five class days of each 
semester, a student, with the approval 
of his advisor, may drop or add any 
course. No classes may be added after 
this time. With proper approval, a 
student may drop a course any time 
before the final. 

Classification of 
Students 

For sophomore rank a student must 
have at least 25 hours of academic 
credit. Admission to full junior standing 
is conditioned upon the student having 
at least 60 hours of academic credit. 
For senior class rank the student must 
have at least 94 hours of academic 
credit. 

Students are not considered candidates 
for the baccalaureate degree until they 
have been granted senior classification, 
have filed an application to take the 
Senior Comprehensive Examination in 
their field of concentration, and have 
filed an application for a degree. 

Class Attendance 



Policy 



Students are expected to attend all 
classes and appropriate laboratory 
meetings of a course and to participate 
in all outside activities that are a part of 
the course. 

It is the responsibility of individual 
instructors to evaluate the importance 
of participation in determination of 



48 



course grades. Students and faculty 
should demonstrate concern for each 
other in attendance matters. The Dean 
of Students grants excused absences in 
the event of serious, personal or family 
emergencies or authorized college 
events. 

Withdrawal 

An honorable dismissal is granted to 
students in good standing who may 
desire to withdraw from the College if 
they have satisfied their advisor and a 
responsible officer of the College that 
there is a good reason to justify such 
action. Students asking to withdraw 
should present a written request to the 
Dean of Students along with a 
statement of approval from parent or 
guardian. The recommendation of the 
Dean of Students is next presented to 
the Business Manager and then to the 
Registrar for final record. No 
withdrawal is considered complete until 
this procedure has been carried out. 



Probation 



The term "on probation" is applied to 
students who are allowed to continue at 
Bethany after having failed to meet the 
standards expected by the faculty and 
administration. Students may be placed 
on probation for any of the following 
causes: 

1) Unsatisfactory scholastic record. The 
following academic basis will be used to 
determine probation each semester: 
Freshmen must achieve at least 1.7, 
Sophomores 1.8, and Juniors and 
Seniors 2.0. 

2) Unsatisfactory class attendance 
during the semester or preceding 
semester. 

3) Unsatisfactory conduct at any time. 



Probation is intended to be a warning to 
students (and to their parents or 
guardians) that their record is 
unsatisfactory and that unless 
significant improvement is made they 
will be asked to withdraw from the 
College. At the end of a semester on 
probation the student's total record is 
reviewed. Continued enrollment 
depends upon the trend of academic 
performance. The Policy Appeals Board 
may dismiss any student if the student 
is not likely to meet the requirements 
for graduation in the usual period of 
four years. An extension of the four- 
year period is granted only when there 
are extenuating circumstances. 

Special 
Examinations 

A student justifiably absent from a final 
examination or a test given in 
connection with regular class work is 
permitted to take a special test without 
payment of fees with the consent of the 
instructor and approval of the Dean of 
the Faculty. For any other examination 
a fee must be paid at the Business 
Office before the examination is taken, 
and the proper receipt must be 
presented to the instructor at the time 
of the examination. 

Transcript of 
Records 

Students wishing transcripts of records 
in order to transfer to other schools or 
for other purposes should make 
application to the Registrar's Office at 
least one week before the transcript is 
needed. Transcripts are issued only at 
the request of the student, and official 
transcripts are sent directly to the 
college or university specified by the 
student. One transcript is furnished to 
each student without charge; for each 
additional transcript a fee of $1.00 is 
charged. When three or more 
transcripts are ordered at the same 
time, the first transcript is $1.00, 
whereas the others cost $.50 each. Fees 
must accompany the request. All 
financial obligations to the College must 
be paid before a transcript is issued. 



Schedule of 
Course Offerings 

Most courses listed in departments are 
offered annually. However, many are 
offered every other year and a few are 
offered in three-year cycles. 

Students should see respective 
department heads for long-range course 
planning. 

Changes in 
Regulations 

Bethany reserves the right to amend 
the regulations covering the granting of 
degrees, the courses of study, and the 
conduct of students. Membership in 
Bethany College and the receiving of its 
degrees are privileges, not rights. The 
College reserves the right (and the 
student concedes to the College the 
right) to require the withdrawal of any 
student at any time. 

Invalidation of 
Credits 

Courses completed at Bethany or 
elsewhere, more than 10 calendar years 
before the date of proposed graduation, 
are not accepted for credit toward 
graduation. All candidates are expected 
to comply with degree requirements in 
effect at the time of acceptance of the 
degree application. With the approval 
of the Policy Appeals Board and the 
payment of the required fee, the 
candidate may take examinations, as 
administered by the various 
departments, for courses included in 
the current curriculum, to reinstate 
academic credit that may have been 
declared invalid because of date. 



49 



Courses Index 

Freshman Studies 51 

Art 53 

Astronomy 56 

Biology 57 

Chemistry 59 

Communications 61 

Computer Science 64 

Economics and Business 65 

Education 68 

English 76 

Fine Arts 81 

Foreign Languages 83 

General Sciences 87 

Geography 88 

Heuristics 88 

History and Political Science 89 

Interdisciplinary Studies 93 

Library 94 

Mathematics 95 

Music 97 

Philosophy 101 

Physical Education 103 

Physics 108 

Psychology 111 

Religious Studies 114 

Social Sciences 117 

Sociology and Social Work 118 

Theatre 121 



50 




Course 
Descriptions 

Freshman Studies 

Interdisciplinary Lecture 100 4 hours 
Sec. 1 The New Religion of Technology 

An examination of some of the components 
of modern western society, from electrical 
guitars to computers to social wants and 
needs. This course will look upon western 
society at work and at play and will study its 
potential survival in terms of its technocratic 
base. (Stanley L. Becker, Associate Professor 
of General Science) 

Sec. 2 Leisure and Work: The 
I nter-relationship 

Within the milieu of our culture, leisure 
activities may influence human relationships 
to social structure and values, free us from 
impairing psychological and physiological 
behavior states, and achieve a wholesome 
relationship to the work ethic. Emphasis in 
this course will focus on the development of 
leisure philosophies; theories of play; factors 
affecting leisure such as demography, 
technology, and population; motivation and 
leisure behavior; economic impact of leisure 
on society; and leisure as an integral aspect 
of our lives. {David M. Hutter, Associate 
Professor of Physical Education) 



Sec. 3 The Sixties: A View From The 
Popular Culture 

An examination of value transformation and 
transmission in the 1960's. Special attention 
will be paid to the way in which the popular 
culture film, TV, magazines, literature 
(fiction and non-fiction) presented the '60's 
as a time of change and, sometimes, the 
substance of change. The critical years of 
1963 and 1968 will receive special attention. 
(Larry E. Grimes, Associate Professor of 
English) 

Freshman Seminar 111 4 hours 
Sec. A. Hatfields and McCoys: 
Appalachian Myths, Legend, and Reality 

This seminar represents a humanistic and 
social scientific venture in regional- 
community study. It takes advantage of 
West Virginia's unique position as a 
laboratory for such inquiry. It explores such 
factors as ethnic patterns and diversities, 
struggles for modernization, demographic 
trends, and socio-cultural attitudes. Students 
will explore the myths, legends and realities 
of Appalachia through selected Appalachian 
literature, films, field trips and craft 
activities. (LynnF. Adkins, Associate 
Professor of Sociology and Social Work) 

Sec. B. Religion Explosion: Varieties of 
Spiritual Experience 

This seminar will explore the growth and 
attraction of the varied religious experiences 
which have become a prominent feature of 
contemporary American life. Several of the 
most important cults and sects will be 
carefully studied and contrasted with 
mainstream and orthodox religious 
experience. (William B. Allen, College 
Chaplain) 

Sec. C. The Thrill of Victory, The Agony 
of Defeat 

This seminar will explore the role of sports 
in American society, examining the social, 
economic, psychological, and recreational 
functions of both professional and amateur 
sports. On the basis of this study, students 
attempt to determine the possible direction 
for sports in the future and to ascertain the 
positive and negative results of sports in the 
present. (James E. Allison, Associate 
Professor of Mathematics) 

Sec. D. Sensitivity to the Natural World 

This seminar is an introduction to the 
natural world based upon the observations 
of plants and animals in their natural 
settings. Most sessions will be held outdoors 
at Bethany and at several nearby, important 
natural sites. (Albert R. Buckelew, Jr., 
Associate Professor of Biology) 







Sec. E. Philosophy and Politics of 
Non-Violence 

This seminar will study non-violence in the 
spirit and actions of Jesus, George Fox, 
Gandhi, Martin Luther King and Cesar 
Chavez. It will examine the validity on non- 
violence as a principle for our own lives and 
as an alternative method of dealing with 
contemporary problems. (Leonora Balla 
Cayard, Associate Professor of Foreign 
Languages) 

Sec. F. Sports Legends and Personalities 

This seminar explores the lives of famous 
sports figures of the 20th Century. 
Personalities to be studied include (among 
others) Babe Didreksen Zaharias, Vince 
Lombardi, Muhammed Ali, and Billie Jean 
•King. Students examine the sociological, 
psychological, and economic impact of sport 
in the lives of these people, the impact of 
their contribution on sports, and the 
implications of these impacts on our own 
individual sport experiences. (James Dafler, 
Assistant Professor of Physical Education) 



51 



Sec. G. Play and Games 

A study of play as the reflection and shaper 
of culture from antiquity to the present. 
Adventure gaming, computer gaming, no- 
loss and psychological games will be played 
and studied. (John U. Davis, Associate 
Professor of Education) 

Sec. H. Medical Practice in Ancient and 
Modern Times 

A consideration of the history of medical 
practice from the time of the medicine man 
through folk medicine and early scientific 
discoveries, to modern medicine and 
surgery. Time will be devoted to the 
biographical study of certain physicians as 
well as to current problems of health care 
for all citizens. (J. Daniel Draper, Professor 
of Chemistry) 

Sec. I. The Television Generation 

This seminar will explore the impact that 
television has on the individual and on 
society. Areas to be examined include 
advertising, race and sex stereotypes, 
television as a narcotic, and television's 
increasing role in education. Students will be 
introduced to techniques of production and 
to television equipment and will write, 
perform and produce an original television 
show as a culmination of the seminar. (Kurt 
P. Dudt, Instructor in Communications) 



52 



Sec. J. Cowboys, Gangsters, and 
Private Eyes 

A multi-media study of the evolution and 
function of a popular hero type, with 
particular emphasis on individualism, family 
life, violence and male/female roles. 
Students will examine literature, film, and 
television in their effort to trace the 
evolution and determine the function of this 
hero type and the values it reflects. (Larry 
E. Grimes, Associate Professor of English) 

Sec. K. Propaganda or News — 
Whose Views? 

Bombarded by messages from the mass 
media, how can we hope to sort out news 
from propaganda? Participants in the 
seminar will formulate their own distinctions 
and definitions. They will attempt to apply 
these to mass media messages and reports 
relating to selected international conflict or 
tension situations. Some attention will be 
given to methodologies of propaganda 
analysis. (William A. Herzog, Jr., Associate 
Professor of Communications) 

Sec. L. The Medium Is The Message? 

This seminar will investigate the influence 
the media is having on our lives from the 
vantage point of the controversial media 
theorist -Marshall McLuhan and his critics. 
Students will be encouraged to investigate 
the modern technology in terms of a moral, 
ethical, and thinking human being existing 
in an ever-changing society. (James J. 
Humes, Assistant Professor of 
Communications ) 

Sec. M. Olympics — Through a 
Looking Glass 

This seminar will explore the impact of the 
Olympics on society. Through an 
examination of the Olympics the social, 
political, economic, and psychological impact 
of competition on participants and viewers 
will be analyzed. Topics will include racism 
and sexism in sport, the aesthetic of sport, 
and such controversial issues as - "Winning 
isn't everything, it's the only thing." (David 
M. Hutter, Associate Professor of Physical 
Education) 

Sec. N. Man, Science, and Technology: 
Problems and Issues 

This seminar introduces the student to a 
series of socio-technological problems 
(population, health services, auto accidents, 
energy, noise pollution, etc) of major concern 
to U.S. citizens. Each of these problems is 
explored in a calm and rational way: Does 
the problem actually exist? If so, how bad is 
it? Why has it arisen? What alternatives are 



available for solution? Thus, the goal of the 
course is careful and logical understanding 
of each problem and the resulting 
alternatives. (Arthur Z. Kovacs, Professor of 
Physics) 

Sec. 0. Crime and Punishment 

A study of the nature and causes of 
criminals and crime followed by an 
examination of systems of punishment and 
rehabilitation will constitute the major 
activity of this course. Students will also 
tour prisons and briefly intern in a prison if 
arrangements can be made (this is a big if). 
(John W. Lozier, Assistant Professor of 
History) 

Sec. P. Computers: Fact and Fiction 

Students will explore the myth of the 
computer in modern society. They will read 
fiction by writers such as Vonnegut and 
Arthur Clarke, as well as essays by futurists 
such as Alvin Toffler. Students will also 
learn to use the computer as a helper and to 
know it as a friend. (J. Trevor Peirce, 
Professor of Psychology) 

Sec. Q. Education of the Self 

Exploration of three areas considered 
crucial to personal adjustment and growth: 
the self-concept, relationships and 
communication, and a meaningful philosophy 
of life. Through readings and group 
discussions, it is hoped that students will 
leave the seminar with a greater 
understanding and acceptance of self and 
others. (7^ Gale Thompson, Associate 
Professor of Psychology) 

Sec. R. The Middle East Today 

This seminar uses short-wave radios, 
American and foreign newspapers and 
journals, propaganda pieces, and other 
means of gathering information to analyze 
current political, economic, and cultural 
developments in the East Mediterranean 
region. (Burton B. Thurston, Professor of 
Middle Eastern Studies) 




Art 



Aims 

To provide a balanced background for 
students who wish to pursue advanced 
study and/or a career in art or graphic 
design; to prepare students for teaching 
or supervising art on either the 
elementary or secondary level; to 
combine art with other academic 
studies as a broad basis for liberal 
education on the college level; and to 
provide an atmosphere in which the 
student is encouraged to acquire 
standards for the evaluation, practice 
and appreciation, and application of the 
plastic arts. 

Requirements for Field 
of Concentration 

The minimum requirement for a major 
in art is 40 semester hours, including 
Art 200, four hours of drawing, two 
hours of painting, Art 201, Junior 
Seminar, and Senior Project. At least 10 
credit hours must be in art history 
courses. Departmental meetings, 
approximately two per year, are 
required of all majors, and each student 
must participate in at least one 



53 



departmental-sponsored museum tour 
of Washington, D.C., prior to the senior 
year. Prerequisites must be observed 
unless the student can show evidence of 
equivalent training or experience. 

The Art Department reserves the right 
to retain permanently one work from 
each student in each class. Other works 
may be held temporarily for use in 
specific exhibitions and will be available 
to owners no later than one year after 
the lending date. 

Only students who have completed the 
following courses or their equivalents 
will be recommended for state 
certification to teach Art: Art 105, 200, 
201, 205, 206, 210, 300, 301, 320, 325, 
478, 480, 490, 10 hours of Art History 
and eight hours in studio emphasis. See 
Education Department listings for 
required professional education courses. 

Art 105 Art Encounter 4 hours 
The exploration of the basic theories and 
techniques of major periods in art-history 
through practice and experimentation. 

Art 110 Creative Sources 4 hours 
Creative Sources: Exploration of art 
fundamentals, concepts, and procedures 
through the creative experimentation with 
materials and techniques. Emphasis on the 
"art of seeing," symbolic inference and 
alternative approaches to problem solving. 



Art 200 Introduction to Two-Dimensional 
Design 4 hours 

Basic course work in the theories and 
practice of two dimensional design; study of 
the elements and materials in relation to 
design potentials with practical applications. 
Prerequisite for all art majors. 

Art 201 Introduction to 

Three-Dimensional Design 2 hours 
Basic course work in theories and practice of 
three-dimensional design; study of the 
elements and materials in relation to design 
potentials with practical application. 

Art 205 Drawing 1 2 hours 
Concentrated activity in drawing using a 
variety of drawing media. Primary emphasis 
is placed on still life and landscape. 

Art 206 Drawing 2 2 hours 
Concentrated activity in drawing using a 
variety of drawing media. Primary emphasis 
is placed on figure drawing and portraiture. 

Art 210 Ceramics 1 2 hours 

Studio experience in forming, firing, and 

glazing pottery, including ceramic sculpture. 

Individual projects according to student's 

ability. 

Art 250-J Jewelry 4hours 
A studio course designed to develop a basic 
awareness of the principles and elements of 
contemporary jewelry design, through 
practical application. January term only. 

Art 300 Painting 1 2 hours 
Creative exploration of the techniques of 
watercolor and acrylics, using still life, 
landscape, portraiture, and imaginative 
subject matter in a variety of styles. 

Art 301 Painting 2 2 hours 
Creative exploration of the techniques of oil 
paints and compatible media, using still life, 
landscape, portraiture, and imaginative 
subject matter in a variety of styles. 

Art 305 Drawing 3 2 hours 
Advanced problems in drawing with a 
concentration in a specific area, including 
still life, landscape, and imaginary drawing. 
Emphasis on composition. Prerequisite: Art 
205. 

Art 306 Drawing 4 2 hours 
Advanced problems in drawing with a 
concentration in a specific area, including 
figure drawing and portraiture. 
Prerequisite: Art 206. 



Art 310 Ceramics 2 2 hours 
Advanced problems in media and subject 
matter selected by the student with the 
advice of the instructor. Prerequisite: Art 
210. 

Art 320 Sculpture 1 2 hours 
Creative expression in three-dimensional 
forms. Students work with materials that 
are readily available and easily handled, such 
as wood, wire, plaster, and clay. 
Prerequisite: Art 210 or permission of the 
instructor. 

Art 325 Printmaking 1 4 hours 
Introduction to printmaking processes 
emphasizing creative expression through 
such techniques as relief, intaglio, 
planographic, serigraphy. Prerequisite: Art 
205 or permission of the instructor. 

Art 340 Art Activities in the 
Elementary School 4 hours 
Study of the theories and goals of art 
education in the elementary school with 
emphasis on the child's growth and 
development through art. Exploration of art 
techniques is included. 

Art 400 Painting 3 2 hours 
Advanced exploration of the aqueous media 
with an individual choice of subject matter 
and style. Prerequisite: Art 300. 

Art 401 Painting 4 2 hours 
Advanced exploration in oils and compatible 
media with an individual choice of subject 
matter and style. Prerequisite: Art 301. 

Art 420 Sculpture 2 2 hours 
Advanced problems in media and subject 
matter selected by the student with the 
advice of the instructor. Prerequisite: 
Art 320. 



54 




Art 425 Printmaking 2 4 hours 
Advanced problems in media and subject 
matter selected by the student with the 
advice of the instructor. 
Prerequisite: Art 325. 

Art 478 Junior Seminar 2 hours 
Required of all students concentrating in the 
field. A survey of art for review and 
interpretation of the particular problems of 
this field. 

Art 480 Methods and Materials in 

Art 4 hours 

Problems in the teaching and administration 
of art programs. (May be taken for credit as 
Education 480.) 

Art 487-488 Independent Study 

2 or 4 hours each 

Art 490 Senior Project 2-8 hours 
Begins during the second semester of the 
junior year. 



Graphic Design 

The following courses provide students 
interested in communications, graphics, and 
advertising with background pertinent to 
the field. An interdepartmental program can 
be developed between the Art Department 
and the Communications Department. See 
the respective department heads for 
requirements. 

Art 303 Lettering and Layout 4 hours 
Introduction to calligraphy, typography, 
letter forms, and layout, with emphasis on 
design, legibility, and creative practice. 

Art 304 Design Applications 4 hours 
Emphasis on problem solving experiences as 
related to visual communications. The 
mechanics and psychology of two- 
dimensional and three-dimensional design 
are explored as a foundation for graphic 
design. 

Art 404 Television Graphics 4 hours 
Emphasis on the design of visual symbols for 
television. Combines principles of graphic 
art with the particular requirements of 
television production. Art 303 and 30U 
recommended but not required. 

Art 405 Illustration 4 hours 
Advanced problems in advertising, book, 
and magazine illustration, with emphasis on 
procedures necessary to pictorial expression 
of ideas. Art 200 and 205 recommended but 
not required. 

Art 406 Graphic Communications Design 
Studio 4 hours 

Emphasis on professional procedures, 
structure, communication functions, and 
processes as applied to areas of graphic 
design in practical applications. 
Prerequisites: Art 303, 30U, k05 or 
permission of the instructor. 

Art History 

The following courses are surveys, intended 
to introduce students to a variety of artistic 
achievements, and the work of selected 
artists, their methods, media, and 
contributions, in the context of their time. 
The continuity of artistic development is 
stressed. 

Art 351 The Ancient World 2 hours 
Beginning with an introduction to paleolithic 
art, this course concentrates on the art of 
the Ancient Near East, Egypt, Classic 
Greece, and Rome. 



Art 352 Medieval Art 2 hours 
Continued survey, beginning with Early 
Christian and Byzantine Arts and finishing 
with Gothic Art. 

Art 353 Renaissance through Baroque 

Art 2 hours 

Concentrates on Renaissance and Baroque 
Art in Europe. Its roots and developments 
in painting, sculpture and architecture will 
be examined. 

Art 354 Western Art from 1800 to the 
Present 2 hours 
Covers such important schools and 
movements as Romanticism, the English 
landscape school, Impressionism, Cubism, 
Art Nouveau, and Surrealism. Painting, 
sculpture, and architecture are treated. 

Art 355 Asian Art History 2 hours 
Introduction to the arts of China and Japan, 
with some reference to Islamic art. 

Art 356 U.S. Art 2 hours 
Survey of the development of the arts in the 
U.S. from Colonial times to the present with 
emphasis upon the evolution of style in 
architecture, sculpture, and painting. 

Art 358 Art History Seminar 4 hours 
Deals with specific aspects of the history of 
art for individual investigation. Also includes 
methods of research. Topics' for study are 
chosen by the students with the approval of 
the instructor. Involves specialized and 
selected readings in the field and individual 
and group discussions. Prerequisite: four or 
more semester hours of art history. 



55 



Astronomy 



(See General Science 201 Astronomy) 



56 




Biology 



Aims 

To acquaint students with the living 
world around them and with basic life 
processes; to demonstrate the scientific 
method as an approach to problem 
solving; to cultivate an appreciation of 
research; to develop laboratory skill in 
various types of work in biology; to 
train students as teachers of biology 
and for certain professional work 
related to this field, and to help 
students find and appreciate their role 
in the natural environment. 

Requirements for Field 
of Concentration 

A minimum of 32 semester hours in the 
department including the Senior 
Project. A minimum of 16 semester 
hours in chemistry, including two 
semesters of organic chemistry. Eight 
hours of physics are also required. 
German or French is recommended for 
those students going on to graduate 
school. A semester of calculus is also 
strongly recommended. 

Students who plan to become 
professional biologists should consider 
the following courses: Biology 100, 101, 
201, 228, 303, 326, 338, 343, 365, 425, 
442, 467, and 490. 



Students preparing for work in 
medicine, dentistry, or as laboratory 
technicians should consider the 
following courses: Biology 100, 201, 
205, 303, 343, 367, 440, 442, 467, and 
490. 

Only students who have completed the 
following courses or their equivalents 
will be recommended for state 
certification to teach biology in the 
secondary schools: select one of the 
following: Bio. 201, 365, 442; select 
eight hours from Bio. 100, 101, 228, 338; 
required are Bio. 303, 326, 467, 480, 
Chem. 101, 102, and eight hours of 
physics. See Education Department 
listings for required professional 
education courses. A second teaching 
field is required. 

Students considering a concentration in 
biology should consult with the 
chairman of the department during the 
first semester of their freshman year. 

Bio. 100 Animal Biology 4 hours 
An examination of the phylogentic sequence 
in the animal kingdom. Emphasis is placed 
on the fundamental structures and functions 
of animals, including man. 

Bio. 101 Plant Biology 4 hours 
A study of plant life including the evolution 
of the various groups of plants. Special 
emphasis on the environmental factors 
affecting the growth of plants and the 
dynamics of the cell. 

Bio. 102 Horticultural Science 2 hours 
Examination of the scientific concepts on 
which horticulture is based. Emphasis is 
placed on the study of the plant, the basis of 
all horticultural activities. 

Bio. 103 Conservation of Natural 
Resources 2 hours 
Study of the rational use of natural 
resources. Emphasis is placed on the study 
of current legislation on local, state, and 
federal levels. 

Bio. 105 First Aid as Related to the 
Principles of Biology 2 hours 
Major emphasis is placed on the biological 
principles utilized in the standard first aid 
and personal safety course of the American 
Red Cross. Red Cross certificates may be 
earned by those passing the examination. 
Opportunity for instructors' certificates will 



be presented as an option at the end of the 
course. Does not fulfill distribution 
requirements in the physical and life 
sciences. (May be taken for credit as 
Physical Education 226.) 

Bio. 167 Introduction to Mammalian 
Anatomy and Physiology 4 hours 
Mammalian anatomy as exemplified in the 
cat. Discussion and study of the functioning 
of the tissues and organ systems of the 
human body. Lab study of the anatomy of 
the cat, and human physiology. Not open to 
biology majors. Prerequisite: Bio. 100. May 
be taken for credit as P.E. 167. 

Bio. 201 Comparative Vertebrate 
Anatomy 4 hours 

Comparative anatomy of the representative 
forms of vertebrates; lab study of the 
comparative anatomy of the shark, other 
lower vertebrates, and the cat. 

Bio. 205 Emergency Medical Training 

4 hours 

The medical, communication, transportation 
records, and report instructions required for 
certification by the West Virginia 
Department of Health as an emergency 
medical technician. Red Cross advanced first 
aid certificates may be earned by those 
passing the examination. Does not fulfill 
distribution requirements in the physical and 
life sciences. 

Bio. 210 Evolution 2 hours 
Evidence for the theories of evolution with 
special attention to the modern synthesis of 
genetics and ecological factors. Prerequisite: 
An elementary course in biology or 
permission of the instructor. 

Bio. 228 Field Botany 2 hours 
Introduction to the taxonomy of vascular 
plants with emphasis on the local flora, 
including the techniques of herbarium 
science. 

Bio. 231 Ornithology 2 hours 
Anatomy, behavior, and identification of 
birds. 

Bio. 303 General Genetics 4 hours 
A synthesis of basic principles and modern 
molecular theory. 



57 



Bio. 326 Ecology 4 hours 
Study of the general principles of bioecology 
of plants and animals. Special emphasis is 
placed on field study of several communities. 

Bio. 338 Advanced Botany 4 hours 
Morphology of the vascular plants plus a 
study of the fundamental life processes of 
plants: growth, irritability, nutrition, 
metabolism, and hormonal control. 

Bio. 343 Microbiology 4 hours 
Morphology and physiology of micro- 
organisms; principles of lab technique; 
cultural characteristics and environment 
influences on microbial growth. 

Bio. 365 Invertebrate Zoology and 
Parasitology 4 hours 
A functional and evolutionary study of the 
major invertebrate phyla. Special emphasis, 
particularly in the laboratory, is placed on 
the parasitic members of phyla. 

Bio. 425 Animal Physiology 4 hours 
Structure and functions of the human body; 
the mechanism of bodily movements, 
responses, reactions, and various 
physiological states. 

Bio. 440 Histology-Microtechniques 

4 hours 

Structure of the cell, its modification into 
various tissues, and the practice of general 
histological techniques. 

Bio. 442 Embryology 4 hours 
Study of the ontogenetic development of 
selected embryos. Major emphasis is on the 
vertebrates. 

Bio. 467 Cell Physiology and 
Biochemistry 4 hours 
Introduction to the structural organization 
of cells and the important aspects of cell 
physiology in the light of modern 
biochemistry and biophysics. Prerequisite: 
Chem. 211-212 or -permission of the 
instructor. 

Bio. 480 Methods and Materials in 
Teaching Physical and Life Sciences 

4 hours 

For course description see General Science 

480. (May be taken for credit as Education 

480.) 

Bio. 487-488 Independent Study 2 or 4 
hours each 

Bio. 490 Senior Project 4-8 hours 
Starts the first semester of the junior year 
and is to be completed in the spring 
semester of the senior year. 



58 




Chemistry 



Aims 

To contribute to the student's general 
knowledge and understanding of the 
nature of the physical world and his or 
her understanding of the place of 
chemistry in industrial and business 
life; to provide experience in the 
scientific method of reasoning; and to 
provide students concentrating in this 
field with a thorough and practical 
education in chemistry which may be 
useful in industrial, technical, and 
graduate work. 

Requirements for Field 
of Concentration 

A minimum of 36 hours in the 
department exclusive of the Senior 
Project. The distribution must include 
Chemistry 101, 102, 211, 212, 222, 224, 
323, 324, 402, 414, 421 plus four hours 
of electives and at least four hours of 
Senior Project; Mathematics 201, 202; 
Physics 201, 202; and at least two hours 
from the group of Computer Science 
169, 269, Physics 221, 261, 300, 
Mathematics 203, 341. Students who 
plan to do graduate work in chemistry 



will demonstrate a reading knowledge 
of chemical German, French, or 
Russian. Additional courses in 
mathematics are also strongly 
recommended. All course in chemistry 
as well as the indicated courses in 
mathematics and physics must be taken 
for a letter grade. For those students 
for whom it might be advantageous, a 
program of study is offered consistent 
with the most recent standards laid 
down by the American Chemical 
Society. 

The entering freshman who is 
interested in chemistry should select 
Chemistry 101 and mathematics at the 
appropriate level. Programs for 
subsequent semesters must be decided 
in conference with the faculty advisors 
for chemistry. Students planning to 
take the MCAT are strongly advised to 
take a course in the history of the fine 
arts during their fourth or fifth 
semesters. 

Only students who have completed the 
following courses or their equivalents 
will be recommended for state 
certification to teach Chemistry in 
secondary school: Chem. 101, 102, 211, 
212, 222, Physics 201, 202, G.S. 480, 
and select six hours from the following: 
Chem. 224, 314, 323, 402, 414. See 
Education Department listings for 
required courses in Professional 
Education. A second teaching field is 
required. 

Chem. 100 Consumer Chemistry 4 hours 
(See General Science 100.) 

Chem. 101 General Chemistry and 
Inorganic Qualitative Analysis 4 hours 
Study of theoretical and descriptive 
inorganic chemistry. The lab work is 
primarily a study of the principles and 
practice of a systematic qualitative scheme 
of analysis for the cations and anions. 
Prerequisites: two units of mathematics or 
concurrently with Math. 103. Three lectures 
and three hours of lab per week. 

Chem. 102 General Chemistry 4 hours 
Continuation of the lecture portion of Chem. 
101 . Study of solubility and acid-base 
phenomena in aqueous systems with 
appropriate lab work. Prerequisite: Chem. 
101. 



Chem. 211-212 Organic Chemistry 

4 hours each 

Introduction to the study of the organic 
compounds of carbon, both aliphatic and 
aromatic, involving a considerable amount of 
the electronic mechanisms of organic 
reactions. Lab work consists largely of 
organic preparations. Prerequisites: Chem. 
101, 102. Three lectures and three hours of lab 
■per week. 

Chem. 222 Chemical Thermodynamics 

2 hours 

Introduction to the concepts and 
experimental techniques of classical 
thermodynamics with special emphasis on 
the concepts of enthalpy, entropy, and free 
energy. Prerequisites: Chem. 102; Math. 202 
or permission of the instructor. 

Chem. 224 Introduction to Chemical 
Spectroscopy 2 hours 
Study of the different energy states of 
atoms and molecules; the statistical 
principles governing the distribution of 
particles within these states; and the 
transitions between states. Prerequisites: 
Chem. 102; Math. 202 or permission of the 
instructor. 

Chem. 311 Bonding and Symmetry in 
Organic Chemistry 2 hours 
Introduction to group theory and simple 
molecular orbital calculations as they apply 
to organic chemistry and to the spectra of 
organic compounds. Emphasis is placed on 
problem solving and structural 
determinations from spectroscopic data. 
Prerequisites: Chem. 212; Chem. 22U or 
permission of the instructor. 



59 



Chem. 314 Introduction to Biochemistry 

2 hours 

Study of the chemistry of some of the more 
important biological processes with 
emphasis on reaction mechanisms and 
methods of elucidation. Prerequisite: 
Chem. 212. 

Chem. 323 Kinetics and Solutions 

2 hours 

Study of rate processes, especially in the 

liquid phase. Prerequisite: Chem. 222. 

Chem. 324 Electrochemistry 4 hours 
Study of oxidation-reduction and phenomena 
associated with solutions of electrolytes, 
application of these principles including 
classical electrochemical analysis, and the 
measurement of basic physical parameters. 
Prerequisite: Chem. 222. 

Chem. 325 Chemical Instrumentation 

2 hours 

The theory and practice of selected methods 
in chemical instrumentation. Special 
emphasis will be placed on those methods 
not covered in other courses and on methods 
helpful for completion of Senior Projects. 
Prerequisites: Chem. 222, Chem. 22J+- 

Chem. 402 Advanced Inorganic 
Chemistry 2 hours 
Chemistry of certain elements and their 
compounds is studied and interpreted on the 
basis of modern theories of atomic and 
molecular structure. The necessary 
foundation in quantum mechanics is 
reviewed. Prerequisites: Chem. 222, 22k. 



Chem. 411 Physical Organic Chemistry 

2 hours 

Study of the theories and techniques 
relating structure and properties of organic 
compounds. Prerequisites: Chem. 212; Chem. 
222 or permission of the instructor. 

Chem. 414 Advanced Organic Chemistry 

2 hours 

Study of selected advanced topics in organic 
chemistry including reaction mechanisms. 
Lab is introduced, where appropriate, and 
stresses the use of instrumentation. 
Prerequisites: Chem. 212; Chem. 222 or 
permission of the instructor. 

Chem. 421 Chemistry of the Condensed 
Phases 2 hours 

Study of special problems associated with 
the liquid and solid states. Prerequisite: 
Chem. 222. 

Chem. 430 Special Topics 2 hours each 
Series of three courses devoted to the 
consideration of advanced topics and areas 
of special interest in the fields of Inorganic 
Chemistry (430-A), Organic Chemistry 
(430-B), and Physical Chemistry (430-C). 
Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 

Chem. 477-478 Seminar in Chemistry 

2 hours 

Presentation of current research topics by 

students, faculty and visiting lecturers. 

Chem. 480 Methods and Materials in 

Teaching Physical & Life 

Sciences 4 hours 

For course description see General Science 

480. (May be taken for credit as Education 

480.) 



Chem. 487-488 
4 hours each 



Independent Study 2 or 



Chem. 490 Senior Project 4-8 hours 
During the junior year the chemistry major 
is introduced to the methods of employing 
the chemical literature, selects a topic for 
advanced investigation, and makes a 
literature search of background material as 
a basis for an in-depth study in this area. 
There is one class meeting each week for 
both semesters. Following this preliminary 
work, an investigation of a significant topic 
in chemistry is made by each senior under 
the direction of a faculty member in the 
department. This work culminates in a 
written and oral report at the end of the 
senior year. Fee: $20. 




60 




Communications 



Aims 

To develop students' abilities to analyze 
and understand the role of 
communication in our daily lives and 
the functions and effects of mass 
communications in society; to develop 
requisite personal skills for effective 
oral and written communication; to 
provide theoretical and practical 



preparation for students seeking 
careers in radio, television, newspaper, 
magazine and book publishing, public 
relations and advertising. 

Requirements for Field 
of Concentration 

Communications 101, 201, 202, 204, 
206, 209, 210, 403, 478; a Senior 
Project; at least one semester's work on 
a campus publication, Cable 3, or 
WVBC-FM; and a departmental- 
approved internship in the mass media, 
advertising or public relations. 
Normally students will take 101 and 206 
in their first year; 201, 202, 209 and 210 



in their second year; 403 in the third or 
fourth year; and 478 in the fourth year. 
Twelve hours in English and/or 
literature courses in the Foreign 
Language Department are also 
required, as is proficiency in reading a 
foreign language at the 200 level. 
Courses in marketing, statistics, 
psychology, and art are recommended. 



61 



Students seeking careers in 
Commercial Art or Television Graphics 
may take advantage of the 
interdepartmental program developed 
between the Communications 
Department and the Art Department. 
See the respective department heads 
for requirements. 

Students must have achieved at least 
sophomore standing for enrollment in 
any of the 300- and 400-level courses in 
the department. 

Comm. 101 Introduction to Mass 

Communications 4 hours 

History and theory of mass communications. 

Role of newspapers, magazines, radio, 

television, books, movies, and adjunct 

agencies in modern society. Effects on 

audiences. 

Comm. 106 Interpersonal 
Communication: Voice and 
Diction 2 hours 

Introduction to effective use of the voice and 
the body in interpersonal and public 
communication. Voice mechanics include 
breathing, posture, articulation, projection, 
pitch and tempo. Use of the body covers eye 
contact, facial expression, gestures and 
movement. Attention to the individual needs 
and to the use of linguistics dialects suitable 
for different occasions. 



Comm. 201 Reporting I 2 hours 
Study and practice of basic journalistic 
writing skills. Concentration on elements of 
grammar and sentence construction as they 
relate to news writing. (Student must 
receive at least a "C + " grade to continue 
with Comm. 202.) 

Comm. 202 Reporting II 2 hours 
Concentration on the news gathering 
process and construction of news stories and 
features. Writing for the campus newspaper 
will be required. Attention to newspaper 
organization and functions of various 
departments. Prerequisite: Comm. 201 with 
at least a "C+ " grade. 

Comm. 204 Copy Editing and 

Layout 2 hours 

Principles and practice in editing copy for 

publications; includes typography, layout, 

design of letterpress and offset newspapers, 

and use of computers. Prerequisite: Comm. 

202. 

Comm. 206 Interpersonal 
Communication: Speech 4 hours 
Introduction to the dynamics of 
communication: levels of interaction 
between speaker and listener. Developing 
the use of voice and non-verbal signals; 
understanding oral style in language and 
logical argument in public speaking. Focus 
on the design and delivery of short speeches 
and on critical listening. (May be taken for 
credit as Theatre 206.) 

Comm. 207 Interpersonal 
Communication: Theory and 
Practice 4 hours 

Introduction to verbal and nonverbal 
interaction in dyads and small groups. 
Examination of perception, self-concept, 
awareness, use of language, listening and 
feedback as they affect oral communication. 
Practice and analysis of interpersonal skills. 

Comm. 209 Broadcasting and Society 

2 hours 

History of U.S. broadcasting. Concentration 
on public issues and the effect of electronic 
media on other basic institutions of society. 
Contributions and criticisms of radio and 
TV. Functions of the FCC. 

Comm. 210 Broadcast News Gathering 
and Writing 2 hours 
Lecture and lab course designed to acquaint 
the student with basic principles of 
gathering and writing news for radio and 
television. Styles of broadcast writing, 
effective composition and editing, use of 



recorded material, and reporters' ethics are 
examined. Class discussions and practice 
sessions. Prerequisite: Comm. 201 with at 
least a "C+ " grade. 

Comm. 220-J Caribbean Journalism 

2 hours 

Study of the mass media and their impact 
economically, socially, politically, religiously, 
and educationally on the various Caribbean 
groups. The course deals with the media in 
the Virgin Islands, Puerto Rico, Cuba, Haiti, 
Dominican Republic, and the Caribbean 
Commonwealth nations. January term only. 

Comm. 281 TV Programming 2 hours 
Historical development. Current trends and 
practices, program designs, and audience 
analysis. 

Comm. 288 TV Production 2 hours 
Lecture/lab designed to acquaint students 
with the tools, elements and techniques of 
TV production. Students serve as floor 
managers, camera operators, audio/visual 
technicians and directors. 

Comm. 301 Principles of Advertising 

4 hours 

Study of history, philosophies and principles 

of advertising. Media, markets and 

merchandising. Role and evaluation of 

advertising. Stress on copy writing and 

layout. 

Comm. 302 Principles of Public 
Relations 4 hours 
Contributions and criticisms of public 
relations. History, philosophies, trends, 
principles, Case studies of institutional 
programs. Preparation of a creative project 
such as a trade journal. 



62 



Comm. 303 Advanced Reporting and 
Features 4 hours 

Extensive practice of news gathering and 
writing. Examination of the functions of a 
reporter's role in a newspaper office. 
Attention to public affairs reporting. 
Prerequisite: Comm. 202. 

Comm. 304 Laws of Communications 

2 hours 

Treatment of national and state 
constitutional and legislative laws and court 
decisions regarding freedom and 
responsibility of the print and electronic 
media, advertising and public relations. 
Principles and case studies of libel, privacy, 
privilege, copyright, and contempt. Social 
responsibility of the media. 

Comm. 306 American Magazines 2 hours 
Role and contributions of U.S. magazines, 
historically and currently. Trends in writing 
style, editing, production, layout, 
advertising, promotion, reader research, and 
circulation. Practice in writing three articles 
for a professional journal and general 
circulation magazines. 

Comm. 307 Interpersonal 
Communication: Oral 
Interpretation 2 hours 
Development of voice and nonverbal skills to 
interpret prose, poetry and dramatic 
literature in oral presentation. Techniques 
for platform and microphone. Projects will 
demonstrate facility in transmitting 
meaning for public performance. (May be 
taken for credit as Theatre 307.) 

Comm. 335 School Publications 2 hours 
Practical course in which class members do 
reporting, editing, and layout work. 
Editorial and design problems of high 
school, college yearbooks, catalogs, and 
literary journals are also considered with 
school periodicals as examination pieces. 

Comm. 365 Audio-Visual Education 

2 hours 

(See Education 365.) 



Comm. 366 Educational and Public 
Broadcasting-I 2 hours 
Survey of the development and current 
trends in noncommercial radio and 
television. Emphasis is placed on the 
Carnegie Commission, legislative action, 
structure, funding, programming, and 
regulation. Lecture, discussion, field trips. 

Comm. 367 Educational and Public 
Broadcasting-II (Continuation of Comm. 
366) 2 hours 

Additional emphasis on instructional TV and 
international systems in industrialized 
countries and Third World countries. 
Students will be required to do in-depth 
historical research over an area or trend 
covered in Part I and II. Research, 
discussion, lecture, field trips. 

Comm. 377 The Performing Arts in 
Radio and TV 2 hours 
Studio course utilizing specific exercises 
designed to develop individual style in 
camera and microphone techniques. Useful 
to all students of the performing arts as well 
as those desiring a career in radio and/or TV 
announcing, acting, and singing. 

Comm. 378 Audio Production 2 hours 
Lecture and lab course designed to acquaint 
the student with basic techniques of audio 
production. The course employs both 
classroom discussions and practical projects 
in the WVBC radio studios. Emphasis is on 
techniques applicable to use of sound in 
radio, television, cinema, and theatre. 

Comm. 382 Broadcast Station 
Management Problems 2 hours 
Legal aspects. Economic and operational 
factors. Developing local talent. Personnel, 
budgetary, promotional, and other problems. 
Prerequisite: Comm. 209. 

Comm. 383 Advertising Writing for 
Radio and TV 2 hours 
Theory and practice in preparing advertising 
copy for local, regional, and national radio 
and TV. Audience evaluation, research, and 
planning campaigns. Construction of 10, 20, 
30, and 60-second ads. 

Comm. 389 Writing for Electronic 
Media 2 hours 

Writing of dramas and documentaries. 
Interviews, research, and study of the 
contribution of dramas and documentaries to 
American cultural patterns. Prerequisites: 
Comm. 209 and 210 in addition to sophomore 
standing. 



Comm. 401 History of American 
Journalism 4 hours 
History of newspapers, magazines, radio, 
television, and books in the United States. 

Comm. 402 Public Opinion 4 hours 
The nature and significance of public 
opinion. Includes studies of public opinion 
formation and measurement, the roles of 
news media, advertising, censorship, 
propaganda, political indoctrination, and 
other factors. 

Comm. 403 Reading and Research in the 
Foreign Press 2 or 4 hours 
Selected readings, content analysis, and 
other research in periodicals of one foreign 
language. (May be taken for credit as 
Foreign Language 403.) Prerequisites: 
Junior or senior standing and completion of 
a 200-level course or equivalent in a foreign 
language. 

Comm. 404 Advanced Advertising 

2 hours 

Study of principles of writing and layout for 
a sustained campaign. Preparation of a 
campaign for a product and/or service of a 
profit or non-profit institution. 

Comm. 405 Advanced Public Relations 

2 hours 

Study of principles of writing and layout for 
an institutional magazine or newsletter. 
Preparation of a periodical for a profit or 
non-profit institution. 

Comm. 478 Senior Seminar 4 hours 
Overview of the history, theory and ethics of 
communications. Review of media writing 
skills. Survey of professional opportunities 
and entrance procedures. 

Comm. 487-488 Independent Study 2 or 

4 hours each 

Comm. 490 Senior Project 2-8 hours 



63 




Computer 
Science 



Computer Science is not a department, 
nor is it a field of concentration. A 
student may, however, complete a field 
of concentration in mathematics with 
an emphasis in computer science 
courses. (See Mathematics.) 



64 



Com. Sci. 169 Introduction to Computer 
Science 2 hours 

Introduction to computer programming 
using the basic language. Emphasis is placed 
on use of the computer in solving problems 
encountered in mathematics. 

Com. Sci. 222 Digital Electronics 

4 hours (See Physics 222.) 

Com. Sci. 269 Advanced Computer 

Languages 2 hours 

Study of any one of several other computer 

languages such as Fortran, as well as an 

introduction to machine language 

programming. 

Com. Sci. 270 Logic and Algorithms 

4 hours 

Discusses the development of the computer 
and how it solves problems through 
algorithms. Since computers are inherently 
logical, propositional and first-order 
predicate logic are discussed. Prerequisite: 
Math 103 or the equivalent. 



Com. Sci. 355 Data Structures 4 hours 
Deals with how computers use data and how 
the data can be effectively manipulated. 
Such things as how files are arranged for 
business and government are analyzed. 
Prerequisite: Com. Sci. 169 

Com. Sci. 360 Computer Architecture 

4 hours 

This course is primarily for students who 
want to learn how the computer works. The 
hardware of the computer is discussed, 
including the central processor, memory and 
input-output devices. 

Com. Sci. 365 Operating Systems 

4 hours 

This course is primarily for students who 
want to learn how the computer operates. 
Computer software is discussed, including 
learning assembly language. Prerequisite: 
Com. Sci. 169. 



Com. Sci. 487-488 
2 or 4 hours each 



Independent Study 




Economics 
& Business 



Aims 

To help students understand how man's 
struggle to provide for his needs and 
wants in a world of limited resources is 
related to all of man's problems: 
personal, social, political, and spiritual; 
to provide knowledge and develop 
proficiency in the application of 
analytical tools to the problems of 
society and business. The courses 
offered serve as preparation for work in 
business, government, law, 
environmental planning, and graduate 
study. 

Requirements for Field 
of Concentration 

Minimum of 30 hours exclusive of the 
Senior Project. The following courses 
are required: 200, 241, 246, 301, 302, 
477. Outside the department, Math 201, 
281 and 282 are required and should be 
completed by the beginning of the 
junior year. In addition, students will 
elect to take 12 hours in one of the 
following areas: Accounting: (Econ. 
261, 262, 271, 272) Finance: (Econ. 311, 
316, 325) Business: (Econ. 230, 280, 
290, 300, 341) Economics: (Econ. 316, 
341, 360). 



65 



A student may elect to develop his or 
her own course pattern consisting of 12 
hours of courses to replace one of the 
above areas of study. In such cases, 
prior consent must be obtained from 
the head of the department. Students 
concentrating in Economics and 
Business are expected to attain a 
minimum grade of "C" in all courses in 
the department. If a student receives a 
grade lower than a "C," the student 
must arrange an interview with the 
head of the department prior to taking 
additional upper-level courses. All 
courses numbered 246 and above have 
prerequisites. 

Students considering economics and 
business as a field of concentration 
should complete by the end of the 
sophomore year: Econ. 200, Econ. 241, 
Math. 201, and Math. 281. 

Econ. 101 Personal Finance 4 hours 
Objectives of this course are to develop an 
understanding of the concepts needed for 
intelligent consumer decision-making. 
Concentration on budget policies, 
borrowing, installment buying, marketing 
techniques, and consumer purchases in the 
areas of food, clothing, automobiles, 
housing, social insurance, personal 
insurance, pension programs, investment 
markets, and estate building. (Not 
recommended for students with a field of 
concentration in Economics and Business.) 



Econ. Ill Introduction to Business 

2 hours 

Structure, procedures, and objectives of the 
business system; economic and social 
environments of business; role of business in 
our culture. 

Econ. 200 Principles of Economics 

4 hours 

Introduction to the inevitable problems 
associated with scarcity. Alternative 
methods of settling economic questions, with 
special emphasis placed on the functioning of 
the market system. Pricing, output 
determination, monopoly power, wage 
controls, and price fixing in relation to 
contemporary issues. The student is also 
introduced to problems of money and 
banking, growth, the labor movement, and 
business operations. Students will read 
broadly from non-technical literature as well 
as conventional text materials. 

Econ. 230 Business Law 4 hours 
Introduction to the nature and development 
of law, the legal aspects of contracts and 
other business instruments as set forth in 
the Uniform Commercial Code, and some 
aspects of partnerships and corporations. 

Econ. 241 Principles of Accounting I 

4 hours 

Introduction to basic accounting and 
business transactions; cash record and 
control; periodic adjustments of transactions 
data; financial statement presentation, 
payroll accounting; accounting and reporting 
principles of partnerships, corporations, 
branches, and departments. 

Econ. 246 Principles of Accounting II 

4 hours 

Basic cost accounting principles including 
job cost and process cost systems; 
interpretation of financial statements; 
control of manufacturing costs through 
budgeting; flow of funds; and tax 
considerations in business decisions. 
Prerequisite: Econ. 2U1. 

Econ. 261 Intermediate Accounting I 

4 hours 

Intensive review of adjusting and closing 
entries. The use of work sheets in the 
preparation of statements. Comprehensive 
study of all corporation accounts. 
Prerequisites: Econ. 2U1, 2U6. 



Econ. 262 Intermediate Accounting II 

4 hours 

Critical study of the principles governing the 
valuation of assets and the application to 
balance sheet problems of the concept of 
matching revenues and costs. Prerequisite: 
Econ. 261. 

Econ. 271 Cost Accounting 4 hours 
Basic concepts and techniques of industrial 
accounting; historical and standard costs; 
budgeting; management use of cost 
accounting information. Prerequisites: Econ. 
241, 2U6. 

Econ. 272 Auditing 4 hours 
Basic concepts of standards of auditing; 
audit procedures and working papers; 
internal and external audit reports. 
Prerequisites: Econ. 261, 262. 

Econ. 280 Management 4 hours 
Study of the management process; 
organizing, staffing, decision-making, 
concepts of control, operating objectives, 
group dynamics; analysis of cases for study 
of managerial activities. A seminar course. 
Prerequisite: Econ. 200. 

Econ. 285 Quantitative Methods 4 hours 
An introduction to some of the quantitative 
techniques which today are playing an 
increasing role in decision making by 
management. 

Econ. 287 Organizations and Human 
Behavior 4 hours 

This course seeks to improve effectiveness 
of organizations by strengthening human 
processes. It explores specific aspects of 
organizational culture such as motivation, 
conflict, power, and leadership; exercises 
and simulations are emphasized. (May be 
taken for credit as Psych. 287.) 



66 



Econ. 290 Principles of Marketing 

4 hours 

Marketing function of the manufacturer, 
wholesaler, jobber, retailer, mail order- 
house, chain store and other marketing 
institutions; cost of distribution; problems of 
marketing management and planning; and 
modern trends in marketing. Prerequisite: 
Econ. 200. 

Econ. 300 Business and Society 4 hours 
Interface of business with government and 
society; management action in situations 
involving significant political and social 
factors; the changing role of business. Open 
only to juniors and seniors. 

Econ. 301-302 Intermediate Economic 
Theory 4 hours each 
Advanced survey of the elements theory 
primarily for students concentrating in 
economics. First semester: resource 
allocation, price determination, output 
determination, and income distribution 
under various market conditions. Second 
semester: a study of national income and 
employment determination, inflation growth 
and economic stability, interwoven with 
mathematical analysis and model building. 
Designed to introduce the student to the 
techniques of differential and integral 
calculus, linear equations, matrix algebra, 
and statistics as applied to the above 
analysis. Prerequisites: Econ. 200 and Math 
201, 281. 

Econ. 311 Business Finance 4 hours 
Study of corporate organization and the 
planning of financial requirements. Intensive 
study of cash flow, budgeting, capital 
decisions, internal financing, and corporate 
reorganization. Prerequisites: Econ. 200, 
2U1, Math 281. 




Econ. 316 Money, Banking, and Fiscal 
Policy 4 hours 

Various money markets; the operation of 
commercial banks, Federal Reserve System, 
and the Treasury Department including an 
analysis of tax revenues, expenditures, and 
debt-financing. Prerequisites: Econ. 200, 
21*1. 

Econ. 325 Investment Management 

4 hours 

Critical study of the various types of 
investment instruments and the relative 
merits of each, investing procedures, 
security analysis, security ratings, portfolio 
theories, and portfolio analysis. 
Prerequisites: Econ. 200, 21+1, Math 281. 

Econ. 341 Labor 4 hours 
General course in labor economics, with an 
emphasis on trade unionism; history and 
objectives of organized labor; employment 
and wage theory; managerial labor policies; 
collective bargaining; current social, 
economic and political aspects of labor 
management relations; and labor law. 
Prerequisite: Econ. 200. 

Econ. 360 International Trade 4 hours 
Principles of international trade and finance 
and their application to the modern world; 
theory of comparative advantage; exchange 
rates, monetary standards, tariffs, quotas, 
and commercial policy; capital movements; 
aid to less developed countries; geographic 
origin and direction of trade routes and 
products. Prerequisite: Econ. 200. 



Econ. 399 Junior Seminar 2 or 4 hours 
Opportunity for interested Students and 
faculty to explore some aspect of economics 
or business not covered in the curriculum. 
Topics have been: The Modern Left and the 
Establishment, Government Regulation, 
Public Finance, Quantitative Procedures in 
Management Science, and Data Processing 
in Modern Business. Students must be 
prepared for advanced work. 

Econ. 477 Senior Seminar 2 hours 
A capstone course integrating the student's 
background, experiences and previous 
business and economics curriculum through 
case studies and simulation exercises. 



Econ. 487-488 
hours each 



Independent Study 2 or 4 



Econ. 490 Senior Project 2-8 hours 
Open only to students with a field of 
concentration in the department. 
Preparation of the senior project and its 
presentation. Time will also be devoted to 
review for the senior comprehensives. The 
topic for the senior project must be selected 
before the end of the junior year and be 
approved by the head of the department. 



67 




Education 



Aims 

To develop a teacher who is a self- 
directing decision maker who 
recognizes the need for personal and 
professional growth, has the skills 
necessary to pursue it, and is secure 
enough to engage in personal and 
professional self -evaluation. 

To develop a teacher who recognizes the 
needs of young persons and is able to 
utilize both the liberal arts background 
and principles of teaching in attempting 
to meet those needs today. The teacher 
also analyzes emerging trends and 
thinks critically about them in an 
attempt to arrive at a more human 
balance between the teacher's needs 
and the student's needs. 

To develop a teacher who has the skill 
and willingness to communicate, in the 
deepest sense of the word, with people 
of all ages and backgrounds. 

In summary, the teacher is a perceptive 
and aware person who can utilize 
intellectual skills and knowledge to 
think critically and pursue self -directed 
goals. 

Requirements for Teacher 
Education 

A student preparing for elementary, 
middle childhood or secondary school 
teaching must plan to complete: (1) the 
requirements for graduation described 
on page 40, (2) a selection of courses 
providing appropriate background for 
teaching in a particular field, and (3) a 
sequence of professional education 
courses and experiences designed to 
give a broad understanding of concepts 
and skills in teaching. Bethany is 
accredited by the National Council for 



Accreditation of Teacher Education 
(NCATE) and is a party to the 
interstate compact for reciprocity in 
certification by the preparation of 
students for certification in the State of 
West Virginia. 

To become eligible for teacher 
certification, the student must complete 
a college and state-approved program. 
It is the student's responsibility to seek 
appropriate counseling from the 
Education Department, preferably 
early in the freshman year, and to 
become familiar with all of the 
requirements. 



The department recognizes abilities 
which students may already have in a 
given subject matter area and assists 
them in planning their program 
accordingly. Waivers or advanced 
standing granted by the College can be 
noted on official transcripts so that 
courses from which a student is 
exempted may be applied toward 
certification. 

Leadership of children and youth 
groups, e.g., summer camps, scouts, 
church school, playground supervision, 
etc., is strongly recommended. 

A period of observation and 
participation in a school is an important 
and integral part of the education 
curriculum. Education students are 
encouraged to consider observation and 



participation in an educational agency 
when planning their intercultural 
and/or citizenship practicum. 

Students enrolling for courses involving 
observation and teaching in schools 
must abide by dress and appearance 
standards of any school to which they 
are assigned. 

Elementary Education 

Students preparing to teach in 
elementary schools will follow the 
sequence of required education courses 
listed below. Required courses cannot 
be taken Credit-No Credit. 



Elementary Education 

First Semester 



Credit 



Second Semester 



Credit 



Freshman 








Psych. 100 General Psychology 


4 


None 




Sophomore 




Ed. 202 Human Development and Learning II 


4 


Ed. 201 Human Development and Learning I 


4 


Ed. 242 Principles and Curriculum of the Public School 
(Application for Teacher Education due April 10) 


2 



Junior 

Ed. 345 Methods and Content in Elementary and 
Middle Childhood I: Mathematics 



Ed. 342 Children's Literature in the Elementary and 
Middle School 

Ed. 346 Methods and Content in Elementary and 
Middle Childhood II: Language Arts 

Ed. 348 Professional Practicum: Elementary 

(Application for Student Teaching due March 20) 



4 

2 



Senior Professional Block 

Ed. 333 Educational Psychology 2 

Ed. 401 History and Philosophy of Education 2 

Ed. 447 Methods and Content in Elementary and 

Middle Childhood III : Science 2 

Ed. 448 Methods and Content in Elementary and 

Middle Childhood IV: Social Studies 2 

Ed. 470 Observation and Directed Teaching 8 

No Other Courses Permitted 



Ed. 340 Teaching Reading in the Middle and 
Secondary School 

Ed. 490 Senior Project 



4 
2-8 



69 




A student interested in pursuing a 
course of study leading to certification 
should contact a faculty member in the 
Department of Education early in the 
freshman year. A Guide to Teacher 
Education, available in the Education 
Department Office, gives a full 
description of all programs. 

In order to meet certification 
requirements, a student must complete 
the following courses, in addition to the 
professional education courses: Art 340; 
Mathematics 225, 226 (must be 
completed by the end of the sophomore 
year); Music 481, 482; Physical 
Education 227, 481; General Science 
202; six additional hours of science 
(both biological and physical) selected 
from a variety of approved courses; 
History 201, 202, 225; Economics 200; 
Psychology 100. A course in literature 
must also be selected. Many of the 
courses above will satisfy the 
distribution requirements of the 



College. (See Page 41.) A specialization 
may be added for Middle Childhood. 
See the Guide for Requirements. 

Each student is responsible for 
planning a program to meet the specific 
requirements for certification. The 
program should be planned in 
consultation with the Education 
Department. 

Middle Childhood Education 

Students preparing to teach in middle 
childhood settings (Middle Schools and 
Junior High Schools) will follow the 
sequence of courses listed below. 
Required courses cannot be taken 
Credit-No Credit. 



Middle Childhood Education 

First Semester 



Credit 



Second Semester 



Credit 



Freshman 

Psych. 100 General Psychology 



None 



Sophomore 

Ed. 201 Human Development and Learning I 



Ed. 202 Human Development and Learning II 4 

Ed. 242 Principles and Curriculum of the Public School 2 
(Application for Teacher Education due April 10) 



Junior 

Appropriate methods courses for Middle Childhood 



Ed. 347 Professional Practicum: Middle Childhood 
(Application for Student Teaching due March 20) 



Senior Professional Block 

(see secondary) 



Ed. 340 Teaching of Reading in the Content Areas 4 

Ed. 490 Senior Project 2-8 



70 



Secondary Education 

Students preparing to teach in 
secondary schools are expected to 
follow the sequence of required 
education courses listed below. General 
distribution and other requirements for 
graduation, and the student's field of 
concentration, must be added. The 
required education courses cannot be 
taken Credit-No Credit. 

Students preparing to teach at the 
secondary level should discuss their 
program with the Head of the 
Education Department, as well as the 
person responsible for the Teacher 
Education Program in the major field. 
A second teaching field is required in 
most areas. A Guide to Teacher 
Education gives the full description of 
all programs leading to certification in 
West Virginia. The Guide is available in 
the Education Department. 




Students preparing for a career in 
teaching at the secondary level must 
have completed the following: a course 
in Mathematics or the completion of 
three and one-half years of 
mathematics in high school; a course in 
literature (a course in literature of a 
foreign language may be counted); and 
a course in Fine Arts (Art, Music, 
Theatre, or Fine Arts). The courses 
above may be selected to satisfy the 
distribution requirements of the 
College. (See Page 41.) 

Each student is responsible for 
planning a program to meet 
certification. This program must be 
approved by the head of the Education 
Department in each subject field within 
which he or she is preparing to teach. 



Secondary Education 

First Semester 



Credit 



Second Semester 



Credit 



Freshman 




None 




Psych. 100 General Psychology 
(Prerequisite for Ed. 333) 


4 






Sophomore 




Ed. 202 Human Development and Learning II 


4 


None 




Ed. 242 Principles and Curriculum of the Public School 
(Application for Teacher Education due April 11) 


2 



Junior 

None 



Ed. 349 Professional Practicum: Secondary 2 

Ed. 340 Teaching Reading in the Middle and 

Secondary Schools 4 

Ed. 480 (or others) 480 Methods and Materials in 
Teaching* 2-4 

Meetings scheduled by Ed. Dept. as needed 

(Application for Student Teaching due March U) 



Senior Professional Block 

Ed. 333 Educational Psychology 

Ed.401 History and Philosophy of E ducation 

Ed. 428 Principles and Techniques of Secondary 
Education 

Ed. 470 Observation and Directed Teaching 



2 
2 

4 

8 



*Some departments offer these courses only first semester or in alternate years. 



Admission to Teacher 
Education 

Students interested in preparing to 
teach are urged to consult a member of 
the Education Department individually 
as soon as possible for counseling with 
respect to prospects for employment in 
various teaching fields, course 
requirements, and state certification 
requirements. 

During the second semester of the 
sophomore year, written application for 
admission to the elementary, middle 
childhood or secondary teacher 
education program should be submitted 
to the Education Department on forms 
obtained from the department. 
Students applying for elementary 
education must have been enrolled in 
Education 201, 202, 242. Students 
applying for middle childhood education 
must have been enrolled in Education 
201, 202, 242. Students applying for 
secondary education must have been 
enrolled in Education 202 and 242. 

Applications are appraised by the 
Teacher Education Committee with 
respect to academic achievement, 
emotional and physical fitness, 
personality traits, and other factors the 
committee considers essential to a 
teaching career. The committee may: 
(1) recommend full or conditional 
approval; (2) suggest programs to 



72 



overcome certain deficiencies, or, in 
some cases; (3) recommend that the 
student not prepare for teaching. A 
complete description of the procedures 
may be found in the Guide. 

A "C" average must be attained in all 
academic work and in all professional 
education courses for admission. All 
committee recommendations for 
approval are based on this condition. 

The committee may review a student's 
qualifications at any time and issue 
appropriate recommendations. The 
general qualifications of all students are 
reviewed at the time they apply for 
student teaching. Forms, procedures 
and dates may be found in the Guide. 

Professional Block 

Each student in teacher education takes 
a designated group of professional 
courses, including student teaching, 
during the first semester of the senior 
year. This is known as the Professional 
Block. Requirements for admission to 
the block are as follows: 

Prerequisites - Admission to teacher 
education and for Elementary 
Education: Psychology 100 and 
Education 201, 202, 242, 345, 346, and 
348; for Middle Childhood Psychology 
100 and Education 201, 202, 242, 347, 
and applied methods as appropriate; 
and for Secondary Education: 
Psychology 100 and Education 202, 242 
and 349, and adequate background for 
student teaching in one or more subject 
fields as approved by the academic 
departments) concerned. Prerequisites 
cannot be deferred until after the 
Professional Block or taken at another 
institution without written permission 
from the Education Department. 

Scholarship Requirements — By West 
Virginia state law, a student in 
Elementary Education must have not 
less than a "C" average in all college 
work and a "C" average in professional 
(education) courses taken prior to the 
time he or she is admitted to the block; 
a student in Middle Childhood or 
Secondary Education must have not 
less than a "C" average in all college 



work, a "C" average in his or her field(s) 
or specialization, and a "C" average in 
professional (education) courses, 
including methods courses offered by 
other departments, taken prior to the 
block. 

Application for Student Teaching — 

Students are required to make 
application for student teaching during 
the second semester of the junior year, 
on forms provided by the Education 
Department. This application requests 
the recommendation of the students' 
senior Education Department advisor, 
if Elementary or Middle Childhood, or 
the academic department head or 
advisor if secondary, and requires the 
approval of the head of the Education 
Department. Applications cannot be 
approved for students not previously 
admitted to Teacher Education. Forms, 
procedures and dates may be found in 
the Guide. 

Competency-Based Professional 
Block — Student teaching is conducted 
for the entire first semester of the 
senior year in area schools or off- 
campus centers. Related course work is 
integrated with student teaching to 
provide direct application to field 
experience. Students assigned to off- 
campus centers may need to live in the 
community where the center is located. 
The College will assist in locating 
housing if desired, and with other 
details of the arrangement. 




Students are not permitted to schedule 
courses in conflict with the block during 
the semester they are enrolled in it, or 
carry extra-curricular activities which 
interfere with the requirements 
imposed by the block. Arrangements 
can usually be made for practice and 
participation in varsity sports. Any 
exceptions to the above must be 
approved by the head of the department 
concerned and by the Dean of the 
Faculty. Students should not register 
for other than the prescribed 
Professional Block courses without 
written permission from the Education 
Department. 



Certification 

Near the end of the senior year, each 
student should initiate application 
procedures for certification in the state 
where he or she expects to teach. 

Applications require the 
recommendation of the head of the 
Education Department. To be 
recommended, a student must meet - 
in addition to certification requirements 
of the state for which he or she is 
applying - the following qualifications: 
(1) successful student teaching 
experience; (2) completion of an 
approved teacher education program; 
(3) completion of the undergraduate or 
graduate program examinations 
(including both the field and education 
tests for secondary) during the senior 
year, as arranged by the Education 
Department; (4) eligibility for 
graduation; and (5) evidence of personal 
traits and character conducive to 
success as a teacher. 

Ed. 201 Human Development and 
Learning 4 hours 

Individual and group development from 
infancy to adolescence. Observation and first 
hand contacts with children are included. 
Educational programs are considered in 
terms of the total child development. 
Freshmen not admitted. 

Ed. 202 Human Development and 
Learning II 4 hours 
Individual and group development from 
adolescence through the young adult 
periods. Applications are made in relation to 
learning theory, self understanding, and 
preparation for working with young people. 
Freshmen not admitted. 

Ed. 205 Teaching the Young Exceptional 
Child: An Overview 2 hours 
An examination of the major handicapping 
conditions associated with the school age 
child. Participants will explore methods of 
identification diagnoses and teaching toward 
academic and personal goals within the 
regular classroom. 

Ed. 206 Individualization: A Wholistic 
Approach 2 hours 
Primary consideration is given to the 
mainstreamed handicapped student. The 
design and implementation of an 



individualized program for academic and 
personal growth studied. Teacher and child 
are viewed as part of a larger ecosystem. 
Instructor's permission required. 

Ed. 220 Educational Alternatives and 
American Youth 2 hours 
The study of educational alternatives within 
and outside of the traditional school 
structure focusing on a more personalized 
consideration of the effects of various 
educational experiences on young people. 

Ed. 242 Principles and Curriculum of the 
Public School 2 hours 
Introductory course in which students 
explore the goals of education and their 
implementation; the role of the teacher and 
professional concerns while applying the 
concepts of human development. 

Ed. 275 Student Development in Higher 
Education 

Study of the philosophy of higher education 
and the development of the individual 
student within the college environment. 
Emphasis is placed upon personal growth, 
communication skills, group dynamics, and 
residence hall programming. Didactic and 
experiential learning in the areas of 
personal, academic, and vocational 
counseling is included. (May be taken for 
credit as Psychology 275.) Enrollment 
limited to Resident Advisors. 

Ed. 328 Human Sexuality 2 hours 
(See Psychology 328.) 

Ed. 333 Educational Psychology 2 

hours 

(See Psychology 333.) 



73 



Ed. 340 Teaching Reading in the Middle 
and Secondary School 4 hours 
This course will focus on diagnostic and 
prescriptive teaching techniques. Both the 
corrective techniques for the remedial 
reader and the higher order cognitive skills 
will be included. In addition to classwork 
this course includes two hours weekly of 
tutoring of middle school, secondary, or 
college students who have been 
recommended by their advisors for help in 
reading. (May be taken for credit as English 
482.) 

Ed. 342 Children's Literature in the 
Elementary and Middle School 2 hours 
Includes background of the history of 
literature for children; familiarity with 
established and current literature in this 
area; critical analysis skills; methods and 
techniques of using literature; work with 
children. 

Ed. 343 Literature and Adolescence 

2 hours 

(See English 290.) 

Ed. 344 Teaching Skills 
Laboratory Non-credit 
Study and practice of specific teaching skills 
related to the technical and media areas of 
education. Students must complete the 
required work prior to student teaching. 
Information related to the course work is 
available from the Education Department 
office. Elementary and secondary. 



74 



Ed. 345 Methods and Content in 
Elementary and Middle Childhood I: 
Mathematics 4 hours 
Practical application of arithmetical skills, 
including the understanding of fundamental 
processes; comparison of different 
philosophies in teaching arithmetic; the 
elements of modern math; and the 
theoretical and practical application of the 
metric system at all levels of the curriculum. 
Classroom experience in public schools. 
Prerequisite: Math 225 or permission of the 
instructor. 

Ed. 346 Methods and Content in 
Elementary and Middle Childhood II: 
Language Arts 4 hours 
Emphasis on teaching the skills of reading, 
listening, speaking, and writing as they 
relate to the total curriculum. Emphasis on 
teaching of reading and the integration of 
the related areas in language arts. Students 
are expected to demonstrate competence in 
appropriate audio-visual aids. Classroom 
experience in public schools. 

Ed. 347 Professional Practicum: 
Elementary 2 hours 

Preparation of the prospective teacher for a 
professional role as observer and participant 
in the classroom at the elementary level. 

Ed. 348 Professional Practicum: Middle 

Childhood 2 hours 

Preparation of the prospective teacher for a 

professional role as observer and participant 

in the classroom at the middle childhood 

level. 

Ed. 349 Professional Practicum: 
Secondary 2 hours 

Preparation of the prospective teacher for a 
professional role as observer and participant 
in the classroom at the secondary level. 

Ed. 350 Reading: Diagnosis and 
Prescription 2 hours 
This is a methods course which deals with 
reading disabilities within the content areas. 
Format will include diagnosis of specific 
problems and their origins as well as 
prescription for correction and remediation. 
Those enrolled in the course will participate 
in laboratory situations to tutor disabled 
readers. (To be taken following or 
concurrent with Ed. 340 or Ed. 346.) 

Ed. 355 Mathematics: Diagnosis and 
Prescription 2 hours 
This is a methods course which deals with 
corrective and remedial situations in 
mathematics. Format will include diagnosis 
of specific problems and their origins as well 



as prescription for correction and 
remediation. Those enrolled in the course 
will participate in laboratory situations to 
tutor students with problems in 
mathematics. (To be taken following or 
concurrent with Ed. 345.) 

Ed. 365 Audio-Visual 
Education 2 hours 
Emphasis on basic media equipment 
operation and production techniques 
common to classroom instruction, 
communications, and business. Includes class 
and individual projects to acquaint students 
with the media field, and a self-instructional 
lab for equipment skill development. (May be 
taken for credit as Communications 365.) 

Ed. 401 History and Philosophy of 
Education 2 hours 

Development of modern education in social, 
historical, and philosophical perspective, 
emphasizing backgrounds of present 
practices, current problems, and issues. 
Current practice is analyzed in terms of 
philosophic rationale and applications are 
made to the school situation. 

Ed. 428 Principles and Techniques of 
Secondary Education 4 hours 
Aims, functions, and curriculum 
organization of middle, junior high, and 
senior high schools. Basic strategies, 
materials, and techniques, including 
evaluation applicable to teaching, are 
integrated with a full semester of student 
teaching in schools. Certification and 
employment procedures, professional 
practices, and continuing education are also 
considered. 




Ed. 447 Methods and Content in 
Elementary and Middle Childhood III: 
Science 2 hours 

Understanding of the concepts of the social 
studies and sciences approached through 
various methods, including unit study, 
inquiry, experimentation, and the process 
approach. Practical application in school 
situation. 

Ed. 448 Methods and Content in 
Elementary and Middle Childhood IV: 
Social Studies 2 hours 
Understanding of the concepts of social 
studies approached through various 
methods, including unit study, inquiry 
experimentation, and the process approach. 
Practical application in school situations. 



Ed. 470 Observation and Directed 
Teaching 8 hours 

Directed full-semester observation and 
student teaching in schools with partial 
assignments in appropriate grade levels; to 
include weekly student teaching seminars 
and a minimum of 150 clock hours actual 
teaching. Students must make applications 
for student teaching prior to advance 
registration. Other course or activities which 
might interfere with student teaching are 
not permitted. Concurrent with enrollment 
in the Education Block. 

Ed. 480 Methods and Materials in 
Teaching 2 or 4 hours 
See courses numbered 480 offered by Art, 
Biology, Chemistry, English, Foreign 
Languages, General Science, Mathematics, 
Music, Physical Education, Physics, 
Psychology, Social Sciences, and Theatre. 
Also see auxiliary methods courses, i.e. Art 
340, Music 480, 481, and 482, Physical 
Education 480 and 481, required in some 
programs. May include observation and 
participation in secondary schools. 
Experiences in production and utilization of 
appropriate audio-visual materials and 
equipment. 

Ed. 481 Methods of Teaching Basic 
Skills - Middle Childhood 
Education 2 hours 

A guided syntheses of the specific content 
and methods related to the Basic Skills 
Program. An awareness of the various 



application of skills across interdisciplinary 
lines will be developed with recognition 
given to a student's individual and 
educational needs. 

Ed. 482 Methods and Materials in 
Bilingual-Bicultural Education 2 hours 
(See Foreign Language 482.) 

Ed. 484 Methods of Teaching English as 
a Foreign Language 2 hours 
(See English 484.) 



Ed. 487-488 
2 or 4 hours 



Independent Study 
Ed. 490 Senior Project 2-8 hours 



75 




English 



Aims 

To help students to develop and 
maintain the ability to write clear and 
effective English; to guide them toward 
an increased understanding and critical 
appreciation of their literary heritage; 
to help prepare them for graduate and 
professional study. In addition, the 
department provides programs that 
prepare students for certification as 
teachers of English and Language Arts. 

Requirements for Field of 
Concentration 

1. Concentration in English requires a 
minimum of 32 hours in the 
department, exclusive of the Senior 
Project. The following courses are 
required: 140 or 150, 325-326, 330, 
341-342, 477. Students should also elect 
at least one Seminar in British 
Literature (courses numbered 420-429), 
and at least one Seminar in American 
Literature (courses numbered 450-459). 
These seminars, together with other 
advanced courses or independent study, 
will extend the student's knowledge of 
one or two areas of literature, provide 
background for the Senior Project, and 
help to prepare for future study or a 
career. Thus, the program of a student 
preparing for the law or another 
profession will be different from that of 
a student preparing for graduate study 
in English or for secondary school 
teaching. 

2. At least 12 hours in another 
department must be included in the 
field of concentration. These courses 
may be related to the student's special 
interests or vocational plans. 

3. Students planning to attend graduate 
or professional schools should prepare 
to meet foreign language reading 
requirements. 



4. Each student must take the 
Comprehensive Examination in 
English. The examination has three 
parts: the Undergraduate Record 
Examination in Literature, an essay 
examination, and an oral examination. 

5. Students are not accepted for 
concentration in English later than the 
beginning of their fifth semester unless 
they have completed English 140 (or 
150) and either English 325-326 or 
English 341-342. 

6. Students concentrating in English 
are expected to attain a minimum grade 
of C in all courses in the department. 

7. Only students who have completed 
the following courses or their 
equivalents will be recommended for 
certification to teach English in 
secondary school: Eng. 140, 210, 
325-326, 341-342, 370, 375; Comm. 335, 
Th. 220, Eng. 290 or Ed. 343, Eng. 480 
or Ed. 480; two courses from Eng. 
100-109, 125, 150, 200, 213, 217, 490, or 
Th. 202; two courses from Eng. 261, 
262, 263, 264, 280-289, 330, 350, 
420-429, 440-449, 450-459, 477, or 
Eng./Th. 270, 273, 274, or Th. 401-410; 
one course from Eng./F.L. 240, 257, 
258. A second teaching field also is 
required. Students interested in 
teaching should consult the Education 
Department listings for required 
courses in Professional Education. 



Writing Proficiency 
Program 

The Writing Proficiency Program is 
administered by the department. 
Students should complete the program 
and meet the writing proficiency 
requirement for graduation before the 
beginning of the senior year. Details of 
the requirement may be found on page 
42. 

Writing tests are given according to the 
following schedule: 

November 

Writing Qualification Test: Freshmen 
(Required) 

February 

Diagnostic Qualification Test: All 
students entering in February 

April 

Writing Qualification Test: Sophomores 
(Advisory) and Juniors (Required) 

The following courses may be taken in 
partial fulfillment of the writing 
proficiency requirement or to prepare 
for the Writing Qualification Tests: 
Eng. 101-109, 120, 125, 140, 150, 200, 
205, 210, 213, 351. Each of these 
courses is described below. 

Eng. 101-109 College 
Composition 2 hours each 
Training and practice in writing clear and 
effective expository prose. Emphasis is on 
the role of persona, point-of-view, audience, 
organization, and style in informal and 
formal writing in relation to specific subject 
matter. Instruction in methods of research 
and documentation is also included. (May not 
be taken on a credit/no credit basis.) 

All courses in the 101-109 series are basic 
writing courses (neither remedial nor 
advanced). The courses share a common 
approach to the teaching of effective writing 
skills, but those writing skills are tested and 
honed against a variety of topics. Students 
may take more than one course for this 
series. 

Eng. 101 Short Fiction 2 hours 

Eng. 102 Appalachian Heritage 2 hours 

Eng. 103 Comedy 2 hours 



Eng. 120 Expository Writing Non-credit 
Training and practice in writing clear and 
effective expository prose with emphasis 
upon the needs of individual students. 
Required of all students whose performance 
on the third (Junior) Writing Qualification 
Test is not satisfactory. 

Eng. 125 Expository Writing 
Workshop 2 hours 

Training and practice in writing clear and 
effective expository prose. After an initial 
diagnosis, an individual program is designed 
for each student. Offered as a substitute for 
English 101-109 and an alternative to 
English 120. (May not be taken on a credit- 
no credit basis.) 

Eng. 140 Introduction to 
Literature 4 hours 

Introduction to the study of poetry, drama, 
and fiction. Emphasis is on the development 
of techniques for the analysis and evaluation 
of poetry, drama, and fiction and on the 
writing of literary essays. Open to all 
students. Required for concentration in 
English. 

Eng. 145 Introduction to Dramatic 
Literature 4 hours 
(See Theatre 145.) 



77 




Eng. 150 Honors Freshman 
English 4 hours 

A course for freshmen of superior ability 
and accomplishment. Introduction to the 
principles of critical reading and writing and 
to the analysis and evaluation of poetry, 
drama, and fiction. Intensive practice in 
expository and imaginative writing with 
emphasis upon the achievement of clarity 
and accuracy. May be substituted for Eng. 
HO to fulfill requirement for concentration 
in English and prerequisites for English 
courses. Enrollment by invitation only. 

Eng. 200 Research Paper 
Writing 2 hours 

Introduction to the writing of library 
research papers. Instruction in topic 
selection, library resources, the research 
process, the rhetoric of research paper 
writing, documentation, and the mechanics 
of format. Each student writes at least two 
research papers. Prerequisite: English 
101-109 or the equivalent. 

Eng. 205 Writing for Business and 
Industry 2 hours 
Writing formal and informal reports, 
summaries, business letters, job 
descriptions, applications and resumes. Each 
student will complete approximately 10 
writing assignments. Prerequisite: English 
101-109 or demonstrated competence in 
expository writing. 

Eng. 210 Creative Writing 2 hours 
Training and practice in the creative aspects 
of expository and imaginative writing. 
Students write essays, sketches, short 
fiction, poems, and dramatic scenes. 
Prerequisite: English 101-109 or its 
equivalent. Required for students preparing 
to teach secondary school English. 
Enrollment limited to 15 students with 
preference given to Juniors and Seniors. 

Eng. 213 Advanced Expository Writing 

2 hours 

Intensive practice in writing expository 
prose with emphasis upon the achievement 
of literary excellence. Enrollment limited to 
15 students with preference given to juniors 
and seniors. Prerequisite: English 101-109 or 
the equivalent. 

Eng. 217 Imaginative Writing 2 hours 
Intensive practice in writing fiction, poetry, 
or plays with emphasis upon the 
achievement of literary excellence. 
Individual assignments and frequent 
conferences. Enrollment limited to 12 
students with preference given to Juniors 



and Seniors. Prerequisites: Eng. U0 or 210 
and permission of the instructor. (May be 
taken for credit as Theatre 202.) 

Eng. 240 Myths and Legends 2 hours 
Study of classical, European, and British 
myths and legends and their use in western 
literature. Some attention to non-Western 
myths. 

Eng. 250 Twentieth Century British 
Poetry 2 hours 

Study of the writing of a selected group of 
important British poets published in this 
century. Emphasis is on ideas, themes, and 
techniques of the poets studied, as well as on 
their life and times. Poets studied are T. S. 
Eliot, W. H. Auden and W. B. Yeats. 

Eng. 251 Twentieth Century American 
Poetry 2 hours 

Study of the writing of a selected group of 
important American poets active in the 
twentieth century. Emphasis is on the ideas, 
themes, and techniques of the poets studied 
and on the interplay of tradition and 
innovation in twentieth century poetry. 
Poets studied are John Crowe Ransom, Hart 
Crane, and William Carlos Williams. 

Eng. 255-256 Great Plays 2 hours each 
Study of masterpieces of the drama in 
Europe from the beginnings to the present. 
Plays are read in modern English 
translations. (May be taken for credit as 
Foreign Language 255-256 or Theatre 
255-256.) 

Eng. 257-258 Great Novels 2 hours each 
Study of masterpieces of the novel in 
Europe from the beginnings to the present. 
Novels are read in modern English 
translations. (May be taken for credit as 
Foreign Language 257-258.) 



78 



Eng. 261-262 British Novel 2 hours each 
Development of the British novel from the 
18th century to the present. 261: Defoe 
through Dickens. 262: Hardy to the present. 

Eng. 263-264 American Novel 

2 hours each 

Development of the American novel from 
the 19th century to the present. 263: 
Beginnings through World War I. 264: 1920s 
to the present. 

Eng. 270 Shakespeare 4 hours 
Rapid reading of the major plays with 
emphasis upon Shakespeare's themes, 
motifs, language, and characterization. (May 
be taken for credit as Theatre 270.) 

Eng. 273 British Drama to 1901 2 hours 
Development of drama in the British Isles 
from the Middle Ages through the Victorian 
period. (May be taken for credit as 
Theatre 273.) 

Eng. 274 British and American Drama in 
the Twentieth Century 2 hours 
Development of British and American drama 
since the beginning of the twentieth century. 
(May be taken for credit as Theatre 274.) 

Eng. 280-289 Colloquium in Literature 

2 or 4 hours each 

Courses for the discussion of special topics 
in literature. Enrollment in each course 
limited to 20 students. 

Eng. 282 Women Poets 2 or 4 hours 
Study of poetry written by women in 
Europe, England and America, beginning 
with the work of Sappho and concluding 
with poets of the present century. Emphasis 
will be placed on the work of 19th and 20th 
century poets. 

Eng. 284 Introduction to Film 4 hours 
In this course, students will study the film as 
a technical artifact, an art object, a mirror of 
society, and a moral statement. They will see 
twelve classic films such as Chaplin's City 
Lights, Resnais's Hiroshima Mon Amour, 
Bergman's Virgin Spring, and Hitchcock's 
Psycho. Fee: $15. 

Eng. 285 Meditative Poetry 4 hours 
Study of the poetry of Donne, Blake, 
Hopkins, Eliot, Ginsberg, and others. 
Special emphasis will be placed on the 
relation of their poetry to both Western and 
Eastern meditation and mysticism. (May be 
taken for credit as R.S. 285.) 



Eng. 286 Cosmic Warfare 4 hours 
Study of some presentations of the struggle 
between good and evil in epics of the past 
and in modern novels. Reading will include 
Beowulf, Paradise Lost, and selections from 
the work of C. S. Lewis, J. R. R. Tolkien, 
and Charles Williams. (May be taken for 
credit as R.S. 286.) 

Eng. 290 Literature and 
Adolescence 2 hours 
Study of important works about or of special 
interest to young people of junior high 
school through high school age. Techniques 
of presenting the works are considered. 
Readings are primarily in short stories and 
novels. Required for students preparing to 
teach secondary school English. (May be 
taken for credit as Ed. 343.) 

Eng. 325-326 British Literature 

4 hours each 

Development of British literature from the 
beginning through the Victorian Period. 
First semester: from Beowulf through 
Milton. Second semester: from the 
Restoration to the end of the 19th century. 
Prerequisite: Eng. U0. Required for 
concentration in English. 

Eng. 330 Twentieth Century British 
Literature 2 hours 
Study of the works of important British 
writers during the present century. 
Prerequisite: Eng. U0. Required for 
concentration in English. 



Eng. 341-342 American Literature 

4 hours each 

Development of American literature from 
the Colonial Period to the present with 
emphasis upon the writers of the 19th and 
20th centuries. Prerequisite: Eng. IU0. 
Required for concentration in English. 

Eng. 351 Literary Criticism 4 hours 
Study of the history of literary criticism, 
literary theory, and applied approaches to 
literary criticism. Special emphasis will be 
placed on the preparation of essays which 
apply various theories and demonstrate 
various critical points of view. 

Eng. 370 Development of Modern 
English 4 hours 

History of the English language from Anglo- 
Saxon to modern English with emphasis 
upon the structure and vocabulary of the 
latter. Not open to Freshmen. Required for 
students preparing to teach secondary school 
English. 

Eng. 375 English Grammar 2 hours 
The description and analysis of the grammar 
of the English language. Various 
grammatical systems are considered, such as 
the traditional, the structural, and the 
transformational-generative. Required for 
students preparing to teach secondary school 
English. 

Eng. 420-429 Seminar in Major 
Authors 2 hours each 
Advanced study of one or more major 
British, American, or European authors. 
Prerequisite: previous study of the author or 
authors in a survey course. Enrollment in 
each course limited to 12 students. 

Eng. 440-449 Seminar in British 
Literature 2 or 4 hours each 
Advanced study of a period, movement, or 
tradition in British literature. Prerequisite: 
previous study of the period, movement, or 
tradition in a survey course. Enrollment in 
each course limited to 12 students. 



79 



Eng. 444 Age of Johnson 4 hours 
Study of the major prose, poetry, and drama 
of the mid-eighteenth century with emphasis 
upon the work of Samuel Johnson and the 
members of his circle, including Boswell, 
Goldsmith, and others. 

Eng. 445 Romantic Poets 4 hours 
Close examination of the work of 
Wordsworth, Coleridge, Keats, Shelley, 
Byron and some of their contemporaries. 

Eng. 450-459 Seminar in American 
Literature 2 or 4 hours each 
Advanced study of a period, movement, or 
tradition in American literature. 
Prerequisite: previous study of the period, 
movement, or tradition in a survey course. 
Enrollment in each course limited to 12 
students. 

Eng. 457 Hawthorne, James, and 
Faulkner 4 hours 

A study of critical and fictional works of 
Hawthorne, James, and Faulkner. Emphasis 
is on ideas, themes, and techniques. 

Eng. 458 The Plays of Eugene O'Neill 

2 hours 

Study of selected representative plays of 
Eugene O'Neill. Emphasis is on the 
characteristic themes and techniques and on 
the development of O'Neill as an author. 
Offered Spring 1981. 

Eng. 477 Senior Seminar 2 hours 
Reading and research designed to help 
students review and organize their 
knowledge of literature. Prerequisites: 
English U0 or 150, 325-326, 330, 3U1-3U2. 



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Eng. 480 Methods of Teaching English 

2 hours 

Teaching of high school composition and 
literature. Literary analysis, systems of 
grammar, and reading improvement. (May 
be taken for credit as Education 480.) 

Eng. 482 Teaching Reading in the 
Middle and Secondary School 2 hours 
(See Education 340.) 

Eng. 484 Methods of Teaching English 
as a Foreign Language 2 hours 
Directed study of techniques for teaching 
English vocabulary, spelling, and grammar 
to native speakers of other languages. 
Practical experience through tutoring. (May 
be taken for credit as Education 484.) 
Offered upon request. 

Eng. 487-488 Independent Study 

2 or 4 hours each 

Individual study in any area of English for 
which the student is qualified. Independent 
study is offered only in areas not included in 
other courses in the department. 
Prerequisites: Adequate preparation to 
undertake the study as determined by the 
instructor; permission of the head of the 
department. 

Eng. 490 Senior Project 2 or 3 hours 
Generally consists of a major critical paper 
on a topic developed from at least one of the 
student's elective courses in the department. 
During the junior year, the student should 
determine an area of interest and make a 
preliminary investigation of it after 
consulting with his or her mentor (the 
faculty member best qualified to assist in the 
project). Reading and research should 
continue during the student's senior year, 
and much of the final semester should be 
devoted to preparation of the paper. 
Sometimes, the project may take other 
forms. Students wishing to undertake an 
unusual project must consult with the head of 
the department no later than the beginning 
of the fourth semester. Credit for the senior 
project is not included in the total number of 
hours required for concentration in English. 



80 




Fine Arts 



Aims 

The Fine Arts Department is not a 
separate faculty; it draws upon the 
faculties and curricula of the 
Department of Art, Communications, 
Music, Philosophy, and Theatre. Its 
aims are to give expression to the 
aesthetic unity of the various forms and 
modes of art, and to permit students to 
pursue a non-professional interest in 
these fields. 

Requirements for Field of 
Concentration 

All students concentrating in Fine Arts 
must take Fine Arts 201-202; Art 200; 
Theatre 255-256, 273 or 274; Music 101 
or 111; Philosophy 368; Fine Arts 477; 
and a Senior Project. In addition, at 
least six courses must be elected from 
at least two of the following categories, 
with an emphasis (four courses) in one 
of the categories. 

1. Art: advanced art studio and art 
history courses 

2. Music: music theory and music 
literature courses 

3. Communications: basic speech 
courses 

4. Theatre: advanced theatre courses 



81 



Students electing this field of 
concentration would normally be 
expected to participate in performance 
and practice activities provided through 
extracurricular programs, especially in 
their area of emphasis. 

Students primarily interested in art or 
music should also consult the sections of 
this catalog dealing with fields of 
concentration in those departments. 

F.A. 201-202 Introduction to the Arts 

4 hours each 

Introduction to the elements of the graphic 
and plastic arts and music and to the 
organization of these elements in works of 
art through the examination of 
representative master works of western art 
from all ages. Consideration is also given to 
aesthetic functions and values. The sequence 
is chronological, the first semester 
extending to the mid-18th century, the 
second, from that point to the present. 

F.A. 416 The Lyric Stage 2 hours 
This course is designed to introduce the 
general student to operatic techniques and 
conventions. The principle emphasis will be 
on the ways in which music enhances 
dramatic elements in operas of Mozart and 
Verdi. No technical knowledge of music is 
required. 

F.A. 477 Seminar 2 hours 
Review of the fine arts area concentrating 
upon the student's field of emphasis, largely 
in preparation for the senior comprehensive 
examination. Required of all seniors in the 
fine arts field. 



F.A. 487-488 
2-4 hours 



Independent Study 



F.A. 490 Senior Project 2 hours 
Independent, student-initiated project which 
may be either research or creative work. 



82 




Foreign 
Language 



Aims 

To familiarize students with the 
language and literature of the French, 
German, and Spanish speaking peoples; 
to help students understand a culture 
other than their own; and to assist 
students in preparing for careers 
requiring foreign language skills. The 
program also provides students 
interested in research with a reading 
knowledge of a foreign language, and it 
helps travelers to foreign countries 
acquire basic conversation skills. 

Requirements for Field of 
Concentration in French, 
German, or Spanish 

A minimum of 24 hours in the target 
language (not including French 101-102, 
German 101-102, or Spanish 101-102) 
plus Foreign Language 425, and a 
Senior Project. 

A working knowledge of a foreign 
language other than the one chosen as 
the field of concentration is 
recommended. Every student is 
required to spend a minimum of one 
semester studying in a country where 
his or her major foreign language is 
spoken. Students expecting to teach a 
foreign language must complete 
Foreign Language 480 and the 
appropriate civilization and survey of 
literature courses. 



Foreign Language majors should 
consider a strong second field in an area 
related to career goals. 

Only students who have completed the 
following courses or their equivalents 
will be recommended for state 
certification to teach French, German 
or Spanish in secondary school. French 
- major: Fr. 101, 102, 200, either 300 or 
301, 313, either 351 or 352, F.L. 425, 
480 and any other four hours in French. 
Second field: Fr. 101, 102, 200, either 
300 or 301, either 351 or 352, F.L. 480 
and any other four hours of French. 
German - major: Ger. 101, 102, 200, 
either 300 or 301, 312, 351 or 352. F.L. 
425, 480 and any other four hours in 
German. Second field: Ger. 101, 102, 
200, either 300 or 301, 351 or 352. F.L. 
480 and any other four hours of 
German. Spanish - major: Sp. 101, 102, 
200, either 300 or 301, 351 or 352, 310 
or 311, F.L. 425, 480 and any other sue 
hours of Spanish. Second field: Sp. 101, 
102, 200, either 300 or 301, 351 or 352, 
F.L. 480 and any other four hours in 
Spanish. See the Education 
Department listings for required 
Professional Education courses. A 
second teaching field is required. 

French 

Fr. 101 Basic French I 4 hours 
Fundamentals of grammar, pronunciation, 
and composition. Emphasis on audio-oral 
approach to develop basic skills of 
comprehension, speaking, writing, and 
reading. One hour of lab per week in 
addition to four hours of classroom work. 
Intended primarily for students who have no 
acquaintance with the language. 

Fr. 102 Basic French II 4 hours 
Continuation of French 101. Prerequisite: Fr. 
101 or equivalent. 

Fr. 200 Intermediate French 4 hours 
Continuation of Fr. 102, with an introduction 
to culture and literature. One hour of lab per 
week in addition to four hours of classroom 
work. Prerequisite: Fr. 102 or equivalent. 

Fr. 300 Conversation and Composition: 
The Living Language 4 hours 
French and American life styles are 
compared through discussions, skits, and 
compositions designed to improve the 



student's communication skills in French. 
Topics center around the school, home life, 
and interpersonal relationships. A feature of 
this course is participation in the weekly 
meeting of the French Club at the dinner 
hour. Prerequisite: Fr. 200 or equivalent. 

Fr. 301 Conversation and Composition: 
Modern France 4 hours 
While improving skills of spoken and written 
communications in French, the student 
becomes acquainted with the nature and 
concerns of modern France. A feature of 
this course is participation in the weekly 
meeting of the French Club at the dinner 
hour. Prerequisite: Fr. 200 or equivalent. 

Fr. 313 French Civilization 4 hours 
Introduction to France and its culture, with 
special attention to its history, literature, 
theatre, art, and music. Readings and 
discussions in English. 

Fr. 351 Survey of French Literature I 

4 hours 

Survey of French literature from the earliest 
periods to the end of the 18th century. 
Readings in French from an anthology and 
certain reference works. Conducted in 
French. Prerequisite: Fr. 200 or equivalent. 

Fr. 352 Survey of French Literature II 

4 hours 

Survey of French literature of the 19th and 
20th centuries. Introduction to explication 
de texte techniques. Readings in French from 
an anthology and certain reference works. 
Conducted in French. Prerequisite: Fr. 200 
or equivalent. 

Fr. 400 Advanced French Grammar 

2 hours 

To facilitate correctness in writing and 
speaking, the grammatical structure of the 
French language is examined. Prerequisite: 
Fr. 200 or equivalent. 



83 



Literary Studies 

Seminars highlighting major literary 
movements and genres from France's 
past and present. 

Fr. 411 19th Century Novel 2 hours 
French romanticism, realism, and 
naturalism are examined through the works 
of such novelists as Hugo, Stendhal, 
Flaubert, Balzac, and Zola. Conducted in 
French. Prerequisite: A good reading 
knowledge of French. Fr. 351 or 352 is 
recommended. 

Fr. 412 Contemporary Novel 2 hours 
Study of the development of 20th century 
French fiction, from Proust and Gide to the 
New Novel. Conducted in French. 
Prerequisite: A good reading knowledge of 
French. Fr. 351 or 352 is recommended. 

Fr. 413 Philosophers of the French 
Enlightenment 2 hours 
Examination of representative works by 
major 18th century French thinkers, 
including Montesquieu, Voltaire, Diderot, 
and Rousseau. Conducted in French. 
Prerequisite: A good reading knowledge of 
French. Fr. 351 or 352 is recommended. 

Fr. 414 French Existentialism in 

Literature 2 hours 

Study of France's existentialists, including 

Sartre, Camus, and de Beauvoir. Conducted 

in French. Prerequisite: A good reading 

knowledge of French. Fr. 351 or 352 is 

recommended. 




Fr. 415 17th Century Classical Theatre 

2 hours 

Study of the great classical dramatists of 

France: Corneille, Moliere, and Racine. 

Conducted in French. Prerequisite: A good 

reading knowledge of French. Fr. 351 or 352 

recommended. 

Fr. 416 Poetry: From Romanticism to 
Surrealism 2 hours 
Analysis of 19th and early 20th century 
French poetry, including the works of 
Lamartine, Hugo, Gautier, Baudelaire, 
Rimbaud, Apollinaire, Breton, and others. 
Conducted in French. Prerequisite: A good 
reading knowledge of French. Fr. 351 or 352 
is recommended. 

Fr. 487-488 Independent Study 

2 or 4 hours each 

Fr. 490 Senior Project 2-8 hours 

German 

Ger. 101 Basic German I 4 hours 
Fundamental pronunciation, grammar, and 
reading. Emphasis on audio-oral approach to 
develop basic skills of comprehension, 
speaking, reading, and writing. One hour of 
lab work plus four hours of classroom work 
per week. Primarily for students who have 
no acquaintance with the language. 

Ger. 102 Basic German II 4 hours 
Continuation of German 101. Prerequisite: 
Ger. 101-102 or equivalent. 



Ger. 200 Intermediate German 4 hours 
Grammar review, reading, speaking, 
writing. Introduction to contemporary 
German writers. One hour of lab work in 
addition to four hours of classroom work per 
week. Prequisite: Ger. 101-102 or equivalent. 

Ger. 300 Conversation and Composition I 

4 hours 

Discussion of life in Germany. Designed to 
improve communication skills. Brief oral and 
written reports. A feature of this course is 
participation in the weekly meeting of the 
German Club at the dinner hour. 
Prerequisite: Ger. 200 or equivalent. 

Ger. 301 Conversation and Composition 
II 

4 hours 

While improving skills of spoken and written 
communication in German, the student will 
discuss contemporary problems. Much of the 
material discussed will be taken from 
current newspapers and magazines. A 
feature of this course is participation in the 
weekly meeting of the German Club at the 
dinner hour. Prerequisite: Ger. 200 or 
equivalent. 

Ger. 302 German Business 
Correspondence 2 hours 
Designed to prepare students for possible 
employment in German-American firms 
through the development of skills in business 
letter writing and familiarization with 
German technical terms in business and 
banking. Prerequisite: Ger. 200 or 
equivalent. 

Ger. 306 Modern German Short Stories 

2 hours 

Selected stories by Kafka, Brecht, Boll are 
read and discussed in German. Prerequisite: 
Ger. 200 or equivalent. 

Ger. 308 Modern German Dramas 

2 hours 

Plays by modern authors, including Brecht 

and Durrenmatt, are read and discussed in 

German. Prerequisite: Ger. 200 or 

equivalent. 



84 



Ger. 312 German Civilization 4 hours 
Designed to acquaint the student with the 
history, culture, and people of the German 
speaking countries, the two Germanies, 
Switzerland and Austria. Conducted in 
English. 

Ger. 351 Survey of German Literature I 

4 hours 

Survey of German literature from the 
earliest periods to the beginning of the 19th 
century. Readings in German from an 
anthology. Conducted in German. 
Prerequisite: German 200 or equivalent. 

Ger. 352 Survey of German Literature II 

4 hours 

Survey of German Literature from the 

Romantic period to the present. Readings in 

German from an anthology. Conducted in 

German. Prerequisite: German 200 or 

equivalent. 

Ger. 413 German Literature in the 
20th Century 4 hours 
Introduction to some of the chief authors, 
works, and literary movements of the 
20th century. Readings (in German) include 
representative works by Mann, Kafka, 
Hesse, Grass, and Boll. Prerequisite: A good 
reading knowledge of German. Ger. 351, 352 
are recommended. 

Ger. 487-488 Independent Study 

2 or 4 hours each 

Ger. 490 Senior Project 2-8 

Spanish 

Span. 101 Basic Spanish I 4 hours 
Fundamentals of pronunciation, grammar, 
reading, and composition. Emphasis on 
audio-oral approach to develop basic skills of 
comprehension, speaking, reading, and 
writing. One hour of lab per week in addition 
to four hours of classroom work. Intended 
primarily for students who have no 
acquaintance with the language. 



Span. 102 Basic Spanish II 4 hours 
Continuation of Spanish 101. Prerequisite: 
Span. 101. 

Span. 200 Intermediate Spanish 4 hours 
Grammar review, speaking, writing, and 
introduction to great works of literature. 
One hour of lab per week in addition to four 
hours of classroom work. Prerequisite: 
Span. 101-102 or equivalent. 

Span. 300 Spanish Conversation and 
Composition: Spain 4 hours 
Intensive training in spoken and written 
Spanish with emphasis on current events in 
Spain. Oral reports are based on readings 
from newspapers, magazines and literary 
works. A feature of this course is 
participation in the weekly meeting of the 
Spanish Club at the dinner hour. 
Prerequisite: Span. 200 or equivalent. 

Span. 301 Spanish Conversation and 
Composition: Latin America 4 hours 
Intensive training in spoken and written 
Spanish with emphasis on current events in 
Latin America. Oral reports are based on 
readings from newspapers, magazines and 
literary works. A feature of this course is 
participation in the weekly meeting of the 
Spanish Club at the dinner hour. 
Prerequisite: Span. 200 or equivalent. 

Span. 302 International Spanish 
Correspondence 4 hours 
Designed to prepare students of Spanish for 
possible employment in international 
government and commercial professions 
through the development of skills in business 
and diplomatic letter writing, familiarization 
with technical Spanish terms, instruction in 
methods of modern translation, and 
comprehensive preparation for bilingual 
positions. 

Span. 310 Spanish American Civilization 

2 hours 

Development of Latin America from the pre- 
Columbian era to the present day in art, 
music, drama, history, and literature. Each 
student does research on a specific project 
selected in consultation with the instructor. 
Conducted in English. 

Span. 311 Spanish Civilization 

2 or 4 hours 

Spain's influence on the history, art, music, 
drama, literature, and science of the world. 
Each student does research on a specific 
project selected in consultation with the 
instructor. Conducted in English. 




85 



Span. 351 Survey of Spanish American 
Literature 4 hours 
Great authors and works of Spanish 
American literature from the beginning to 
the present. Conducted in Spanish. 
Prerequisite: Span. 200 or equivalent. 

Span. 352 Literature of Spain: Survey 

4 hours 

Great authors and works of Spanish 
literature from the beginning to the present. 
Conducted in Spanish. Prerequisite: Span. 
200 or equivalent. 

Literary Studies 

Span. 403 Literature of Spain: The 
Generation of '98 and the 20th Century 

4 hours 

Works of the novelists and philosophers who 
searched for the reasons for Spain's decline 
at the end of the 19th century, and of 
representative authors of the 20th century. 
Prerequisite: Span. 200 or equivalent. 

Span. 406 Contemporary Literature in 
Spanish America 4 hours 
Survey of modern novels and their 
expression of important aspects of Latin 
American life. Prerequisite: Span. 200 or 
equivalent. 

Span. 451 Literature of Spain: 
19th Century Romantics 2 hours 
Poetry, plays, and legends from the first half 
of the 19th century. Prerequisite: Span. 200 
or equivalent. 



86 



Span. 452 Literature of Spain: 
19th Century Realists 2 hours 
The regional novel of customs. 
Psychological, social, and thesis novels of the 
last half of the 19th century. Prerequisite: 
Span. 200 or equivalent. 

Span. 453 Literature of Spain: The 

Golden Age 2 hours 

Poetry and drama of the 16th and 17th 

centuries when Spain was at its artistic and 

literary height. Prerequisite: Span. 200 or 

equivalent. 

Span. 454 Literature of Spain: 

Don Quixote 2 hours 

Cervantes' masterpiece presenting the 

contrast of idealism and imagination versus 

realism and practicality in a great novel. 

Prerequisite: Span. 200, or equivalent. 

Span. 487-488 Independent Study 

2 or 4 hours each 

Span. 490 Senior Project 2-8 hours 

Greek 

Gr. 301 Hellenistic Greek I 4 hours 
Introduction to the grammar of the Greek 
language in the Hellenistic Age. Primary 
emphasis is placed on the structure of the 
Greek of the New Testament. 

Gr. 302 Hellenistic Greek II 4 hours 
Continuation of Gr. 301 with greater 
emphasis upon syntax and reading of the 
Greek New Testament. 

Gr. 401 Hellenistic Greek Readings I 

4 hours 

For students who have had a basic course in 
the Greek language. Facilitates the reading 
and interpretation of texts from the 
Septuagint, the New Testament, papyri, and 
early Christian writers. 

Gr. 402 Hellenistic Greek Readings II 

4 hours 

Continuation of Gr. 401 with readings in 

early Christian literature. 

Gr. 487-488 Independent Study 

2 or 4 hours each 

Foreign Language 

F.L. 115-J Caribbean Culture 2 hours 
Study of representative works of 20th 
century authors of the Caribbean islands of 
Cuba, Jamaica, Haiti, Dominican Republic, 
Puerto Rico, and the Lesser Antilles. The 
French, Spanish, and Dutch writings are 
available in translation. Taught on St. Croix, 
one of the Virgin Islands, during the second 
and third weeks of January. 



F.L. 255-256 Great Plays 2 hours each 
(See English 255-256.) 

F.L. 257-258 Great Novels 2 hours each 
(See English 257-258.) 

F.L. 320 Seminar in Bilingual-B '.cultural 
Studies 2 hours 

A study of the needs of bilingual-bicultural 
education in the U.S., its history, current 
theories and practices. 

F.L. 403 Reading and Research in the 
Foreign Press 2 hours 
(See Communications 403.) 

F.L. 425 Introduction to Linguistic 
Development of Languages 2 hours 
Basic concepts and terminology of 
linguistics. Development of English, 
French, German, and Spanish from the Indo- 
European to modern times. Required of all 
majors in the department. 

F.L. 480 Methods and Materials in 
Teaching Foreign Languages 2 hours 
Methods, teaching materials, lesson 
planning, and extracurricular activities 
necessary for the teacher of French, 
German, or Spanish as a foreign language. 
(May be taken for credit as Education 480.) 

F.L. 481 Foreign Languages for Middle 
Childhood 2 hours 
Methods, teaching materials, lesson 
planning, and extracurricular activities 
necessary for the middle childhood teacher 
of French, German, or Spanish as a foreign 
language. Special emphasis on aural-oral 
teaching techniques and characteristics of 
the transescent language learner. 

F.L. 482 Methods and Materials in 
Bilingual-Bicultural Education 2 hours 
Methods, teaching materials, lesson planning 
and extracurricular activities necessary for 
the teacher of bilingual-bicultural education. 
(May be taken for credit as Education 482.) 

F.L. 487-488 Independent Study in 
Foreign Languages 2 or 4 hours 




General 
Sciences 



The division of General Sciences is a 
grouping of courses only. It is not a 
department and does not offer a field of 
concentration. It provides a number of 
programs, many of which are 
interdisciplinary in nature, designed 
principally for non-science majors. 
Some of these courses, however, such 
as the history of science, are excellent 
supplements to the college programs of 
science majors. In addition, special 
courses are offered for those who are 
interested in the teaching of science at 
the secondary school level. 

Only students who have completed the 
following courses or their equivalents 
will be recommended for state 
certification to teach General Science in 
the secondary school: Bio. 100, 101, 103. 
Chem. 101, 102. Physics 101, 102 or 201, 
202. G.S. 201, 480. See the Education 
Department listings for required 
Professional Education courses. A 
second teaching field is required. 



87 



G.S. 100 Consumer Chemistry 4 hours 
A course emphasizing an understanding of 
chemical concepts relevant to our everyday 
lives. At the end of this course, a student 
should be able to analyze and discuss 
magazine and newspaper articles dealing 
with the subjects related to chemistry. This 
course is designed for non-science students. 
(May be taken for credit as Chemistry 100.) 

G.S. 101 Natural Philosophy 4 hours 
Examination of the physical universe and 
man's place in it through an emphasis upon 
the ways in which the physical sciences have 
altered and are now altering man's 
understanding of the universe. 

G.S. 201 Astronomy 4 hours 
Non-technical course in descriptive 
astronomy and cosmology, including such 
topics as the solar system, stars, galactic 
systems, telescopy, rocketry, and space 
travel. 

G.S. 202 Physical and Cultural 
Geography 4 hours 

Study of the physical processes tending to 
alter the climate and surface features of the 
earth and their consequent effects upon 
human populations. 

G.S. 209 History and Philosophy of 
Science 4 hours 

Study of some of the major ideas conceived 
by western man in attempting to 
comprehend and describe the natural world. 
(May be taken for credit as Philosophy 353.) 
Prerequisite: one year of college level science 
or -permission of the instructor. 




G.S. 210 Science, Technology, and 
Society 4 hours 

Historical examination of the effects of 
scientific and technological innovations upon 
various societies, emphasis being placed 
upon technology and science of the western 
world since 1850. 

G.S. 211 Energy, Conservation and the 
Environment 2 hours 
This course will examine the energy 
supply/demand and environmental problems 
facing our society in the future, as well as 
the necessity of conservation of present 
resources. The interrelationships between 
energy available and economic, political, 
social and technological systems also will be 
explored. 

G.S. 480 Methods and Materials in 
Teaching Physical and Life Sciences 

4 hours 

Aims and methods of teaching the physical 
and life sciences in the secondary schools. 
Special attention is given to teaching 
general laboratory procedures and 
techniques of teaching. Each of the 
departments in the physical and life sciences 
participates in the program. Prerequisite: 
16 hours in one of the physical or life sciences 
or permission of the instructor. 

G.S. 487-488 Independent Study 

2 or 4 hours each 



Geography 



(See General Science 202 and Social 
Science 302.) 



Heuristics 



Heuristics 301-302 2 hours each 
Investigation and discovery of 
methodologies of problem-solving within a 
broad spectrum of academic disciplines and 
pragmatic pursuits. Not open to freshmen. 



88 




History and 

Political 

Science 



Aims 

To present the origin and development 
of institutions and ideas; to point out 
the great traditions that are molding 
our thought and action today; and to 
gain a better perspective of our 
political, economic, cultural, and social 
life. The courses in political science are 
intended to acquaint the student with 
political institutions and political 
problems in the United States and the 
world today. 

Requirements for Field of 
Concentration in History 

Twelve hours in European history, 
including History 301-302, 12 hours of 
American history, including History 
201-202. Four hours in political science, 
four hours in either African or Asian or 
Latin American history, History 477, 
and a Senior Project. Students planning 
to attend graduate or professional 
schools should anticipate possible 
requirements in the areas of foreign 
language, statistics, accounting, and 
computer technology. 



89 



Requirements for Field of 
Concentration in Political 
Science and History 

Students selecting a field of 
concentration in this area are required 
to take Political Science 225, 328, 357, 
478; History 201-202, 302 (with History 
100 or 301 as possible substitutes when 
necessary); plus 16 additional hours 
selected from the area of political 
science, including a Senior Project. 
Students planning to attend law school, 
graduate school, or other professional 
schools should anticipate possible 
requirements in such areas as foreign 
language, statistics, economics, 
accounting, and computer technology. 

European and World History 

Hist. 100 Western Civilization 4 hours 
A survey of the Greek, Roman, Medieval 
and modern periods of western history. 
Cultural, diplomatic, economic, social and 
political topics are considered. 

Hist. 297-298 Special Studies in History 

2 or 4 hours 

Designed to permit students to study with 
various faculty members in the department 
or with visiting instructors or other 
competent foreign visitors. 

Hist. 301-302 Modern European History 

4 hours each 

Survey of European civilization from the 
Renaissance to the present. Second semester 
begins with 1815. 



Hist. 325 British History to the 
18th Century 4 hours 
Study of the structure and growth of British 
society from Roman Britain to the Glorious 
Revolution of 1688. Topics such as Anglo- 
Saxon England, the nature of medieval 
kingship, the evolution of parliament, the 
English Reformation, and the causes and 
nature of the 17th century revolutions will 
be examined. 

Hist. 326 British History Since the 
17th Century 4 hours 
Study of the structure and growth of British 
society from 1688 to the present. Topics such 
as the nature of 18th century politics, the 
Industrial Revolution, liberal and Victorian 
England, the impact of the World Wars on 
British society, and the "Irish Question" will 
be examined. 

Hist. 351 Ancient Near Eastern 
Civilization 4 hours 
(See Religious Studies 351.) 

Hist. 353 Hellenistic Civilization 

4 hours 

(See Religious Studies 353.) 

Hist. 371 Introduction to African 
Civilization 4 hours 
Historical survey of the peoples, nations, 
kingdoms, and empires of sub-saharan 
Africa from prehistory to the beginning of 
the colonial period. The cultural, religious, 
and political life of the African peoples is 
considered. 

Hist. 372 Modern African States 2 hours 
Study of the growth and evolution of the 
modern African states from colonial 
possessions to independent nations. The 
problems facing Africa in the modern world 
are examined. 

Hist. 381 History of the Middle East and 
North Africa 2 hours 
Historical survey of the rise of the Islamic 
empires from the time of the Prophet, 
including the Caliphates, the classical period 
of Islam, and the Ottoman rule to the end of 
World War II. 

Hist. 382 Cultural Life in the Middle 
East and North Africa 4 hours 
Study of the cultural developments and 
impact of Islamic civilization, including 
religion, art, literature, philosophy, and law. 
(May be taken for credit as R.S. 882.) 



Hist. 385 History and Culture of East 

Asia 4 hours 

Study of the history and culture of East Asia 
with special emphasis on China and Japan. 
During the first section of the course, 
cultural matters will be examined within the 
context of the pre-modern period (4000 B.C.- 
1600 A.D.). Most of the class time will be 
devoted to a study of historical 
developments during the early modern and 
modern periods (1600-1945), especially in 
relation to such issues as international 
relations and modernization. Prerequisite: 
One survey course in American or European 
history. 

Hist. 428 The Middle Ages 4 hours 
Study of the decline of ancient civilization, 
the Byzantine and Islamic cultures, and 
especially the development of Western 
Europe to the 14th century. 

Hist. 468 Revolution and Reaction in 
Modern History 4 hours 
Comparative study of the English, 
American, French, and Russian revolutions. 
Emphasis is placed on the origins and 
characteristics of revolutions, the roles of 
revolutionary leaders, and the relationship 
of the 17th, 18th, and 19th century 
revolutions to contemporary struggles in the 
third world. 

American History 

Hist. 201-202 U.S. History 4 hours each 
Political, economic, and social growth of 
America. First semester covers the period of 
exploration to 1865; second semester from 
1865 to the present. 

Hist. 225 West Virginia History, 
Government, and Geography 2 hours 
History of the western section of Virginia to 
the Civil War and the history and government 
of West Virginia to the present. The physical, 
political, and social geography of the state is 
included. Field trips to various sections of the 
state are included as part of the course. 



90 



Hist. 275 Connections 2 hours 
A television/seminar program that explores the 
relationships between technologies of the past 
and present. The flexible course design will 
appeal to students of varying backgrounds in 
science and technology. 

Hist. 341 Development of the American 
Nation 4 hours 

History of the U.S. from 1816 to 1850. 
Considers the growth of American nationalism 
following the War of 1812; the rise of 
Jacksonian Democracy and the effects of that 
movement through the Polk administration. 

Hist. 342 Age of Big Business 4 hours 
Political, social, and economic history of the 
U.S. from 1865 to 1914. Emphasis is placed 
on the growth of industrialism during this 
period and the resulting attempts at social 
reform. 

Hist. 344 Civil War and 
Reconstruction 4 hours 
Study of the coming of the Civil War and the 
period of Reconstruction to 1877. Attention 
is devoted to the evolution of the slavery 
controversy, the constitutional questions of 
nullification and secession, the development 
of Southern nationalism, an analysis of Civil 
War causation, the campaigns of the war, 
and the objectives and programs of 
Presidential and Congressional 
Reconstruction. Prerequisite: Hist. 201 or its 
equivalent. 

Hist. 423 Contemporary U.S. 
History 4 hours 

The history of the United States since 1945. 
The course will include a brief review of the 
Progressive Era, the 1920s and the New 
Deal. Films, records, contemporary 
magazines, scholarly journals and 
newspapers will be used in addition to the 
text books. 

Hist. 426 Introduction to Latin 
America 2 hours 

Study of the geography, politics, social 
composition, economic structure, and 
problems of modern Latin America. 



Hist. 427 History of Latin 

America 2 hours 

Introduction to the pre-Columbian, Colonial, 

and Republican history of Latin America. 

Hist. 477 Historical Writings and 
Methods 2 hours 

Study of the major works of the ancient, 
medieval, and modern European and 
American historians with emphasis on the 
various schools and methods of 
interpretation. The student also receives an 
introduction to the nature and methods of 
history as an intellectual discipline. 
Emphasis is placed on the technique of 
historical research, and the art of expression 
and critical analysis. 

Hist. 487-488 Independent Study 2 or 4 

hours each 

Hist. 490 Senior Project 2-6 hours 
Begins first semester of the senior year. 

Political Science 

Pol. Sci. 225 American 
Government 4 hours 
Introduction to the formal and informal 
institutions and processes which comprise the 
American political system at the national level. 
Emphasis is placed on the mechanics of policy 
making and the behavior and attitudes of the 
American electorate. 

Pol. Sci. 226 State and Local 
Government 2 hours 

Study of the government and politics of states 
and local political subdivisions. Attention is 
given to the federal-state relationship, 
interstate relationships, and relationships 
between state and local governments, as well 
as to the structure, organization, functions, and 
problems of state and local governments. 

Pol. Sci. 243 International 
Politics 4 hours 

Analysis of the factors involved in the decision- 
making process among nations, traditionally 
and in a global perspective. This analysis is 
applied to theoretical, historical, and current 
political situations. 

Pol. Sci. 300 Public 
Administration 4 hours 
An examination of the basic concerns of 
American public agencies, principally federal; 
problems of planning, organization, staffing 
and efficiency; problems of their proper place 
in the political arena; problems of relating 
democratic principles of administrative actions. 



Pol. Sci. 328 Comparative 
Government 4 hours 
Survey of the major approaches to the study 
of political systems, with attention to 
similarities and differences. Focuses on 
political parties, governmental institutions, 
ideologies, elites, interest groups, and 
political culture. The material involves 
specific case studies of representative 
countries in Western and Eastern Europe, 
the Soviet Union, Asia, Africa, Latin 
America, and the Middle East. 

Pol. Sci. 339 American Political 
Parties 4 hours 

Study of major and minor political parties in 
the U.S. Attention is given to the history, 
structure, functions, tactics, and financing of 
political parties in a democratic system, as 
well as to the American electoral process; 
and a brief look at foreign party systems. 
The role of interest or pressure groups in a 
democratic pluralist society is also given 
major attention. Pol. Sci. 225 or Hist. 
201-202 are recommended for background in 
the field. 

Pol. Sci. 341 U.S. Foreign Policy 2 hours 
Examination of the personalities, 
assumptions, and mechanics behind the 
making of U.S. foreign policy since World 
War II. The material provides a framework 
for analyzing and evaluating various 
interpretations of national security and 
subsequent international commitments. 
Reference is made to particular examples of 
foreign policies, such as the Truman 
Doctrine, Korea, Vietnam, and Sino- 
American and U.S. Soviet relations. 
Prerequisite: Pol. Sci. 225 or permission of 
the instructor. 

Pol. Sci. 357 History of Political 
Philosophy 4 hours 
Survey of the major literature in the 
evolution of political philosophy from the 
classical period to Karl Marx, with an 
attempt to gain perspective on both the 
eastern and western traditions. A special 
effort is made to relate the principal 
concepts in political philosophy, such as 
justice, freedom, and equality, to 
contemporary politics. 



91 



Pol. Sci. 371 Modern Political Ideologies 

4 hours 

Survey and analysis of the literature of 
prevalent 20th century ideologies, including 
communism, socialism, pacifism, anarchism, 
and democracy. Prerequisite: Pol. Sci. 357 or 
permission of the instructor. 

Pol. Sci. 372 Modern African States 

2 hours 

Study of the growth and evolution of the 
modern African states from colonial 
possessions to independent nations. The 
problems facing Africa in the modern world 
are examined. 

Pol. Sci. 392 Contemporary East Asian 
Politics 4 hours 

Introduction to the two predominant 
political styles of East Asia in the post-war 
period with special attention to the political, 
cultural, social, and economic characteristics 
of Japanese democracy and Chinese 
communism. 

Pol. Sci. 426 Introduction to Latin 
America 2 hours 

Study of the geography, politics, social 
composition, economic structure, and 
problems of modern Latin America. 

Pol. Sci. 465 Constitutional Law 

4 hours 

Study of the judicial elaboration and 
interpretation of the U.S. Constitution. A 
case study approach to the historical 
development of American constitutional 
principles. Pol. Sci. 225 or Hist. 201-202 are 
recommended for background in the field. 

Pol. Sci. 468 Revolution and Reaction in 
Modern History 4 hours 
(See History 468.) 

Pol. Sci. 478 Research Methods in 
Political Science 4 hours 
Consideration of the scope of political 
science through a survey of the prominent 
research in the field. Attention will be given 
to the "scientific" dimension of this work 
including reference to computer-assisted 
political analysis. 

Pol. Sci. 487-488 
2 or 4 hours each 



Independent Study 



Pol. Sci. 490 Senior Project 2-6 hours 
Begins first semester of the senior year. 



92 




Interdisciplinary Studies 



Aims 

The interdisciplinary studies program 
recognizes that some students are more 
likely to achieve the goals of an 
"integrated education" and a "self- 
examined life," as set forth in the 
Bethany Plan, by designing their own 
cross-disciplinary field of concentration. 
The aim of the program is to facilitate 
such study by providing the machinery 
needed for its implementation and 
evaluation; by aiding the student in the 
study of interdisciplinary methods and 
problems; by critically evaluating the 
student's grasp of methods and 
materials of various disciplines; and by 
requiring the student to integrate his or 
her knowledge of materials and 
methods, derived from various 
disciplines, around a single problem or 
idea. 

Requirements for Field 
of Concentration 

The interdisciplinary studies program is 
designed to facilitate the faculty- 
sponsored or student-initiated program 
of study that cuts across departmental 
lines. The initiator of the program is 
responsible for establishing the content 
of the special curriculum, for stating 
the goals of the special curriculum, and 
for justifying the creation of a special 
curriculum. The Committee on 
Interdisciplinary Study approves or 
rejects the curriculum proposal. The 
program must include at least 24 hours 
(excluding the Senior Project) in an 
approved core curriculum. The special 
curriculum may not exceed 72 hours. 
No more than 48 hours in any one 
department will be counted toward 
graduation. All work is supervised by 
the director of interdisciplinary studies. 
The director serves as the student's 



academic advisor throughout the 
program of study. 

Admission to the 
Interdisciplinary Studies 
Program 

It is recommended that all proposals for 
admission to the program be submitted 
to the director on or before the last day 
of the last semester of the student's 
sophomore year. Students who apply 
after this date may find that it will take 
them an extra summer or an extra 
semester to meet all requirements for 
graduation. 

Student proposals must follow the 
outline provided by the Committee on 
Interdisciplinary Study and must be 
accompanied by proper supporting 
documents. 

All proposals should be prepared in 
consultation with the director of 
interdisciplinary studies. 

Senior Year 

Senior Comprehensive Examination: 
Students must have completed at least 
24 hours of study in their special 
curriculum (including all courses 
designed as required in the original 
proposal) before they are eligible to 
take the examination. 

The Senior Comprehensive 
Examination will be designed to 
measure the student's grasp of methods 
and materials basic to the disciplines 
emphasized in the core curriculum; to 
test the student's capacity for 
integrating materials and methods from 
the various disciplines; and to allow the 
student to evaluate the success of the 
special curriculum in light of his or her 
stated goals. 

Senior Project: Students who wish to do 
4-8 hour Senior Projects must have 
their programs approved by the 
director on or before the last day of the 
last semester of their junior year. 



I.S. 100 Freshman Interdisciplinary 
Lecture 4 hours 

(See page 51 for descriptions of freshman 
interdisciplinary lectures.) 

I.S. 201 World Hunger: The Quest for 
Survival 4 hours 

An exploration of the problems of world 
food resources, production and distribution. 
Special emphasis will be placed on 
inequalities between the have's and 
have-not's, the effects of malnourishment on 
human behavior and on social and political 
conditions, and alternative technological and 
political solutions to the problem. (Not open 
to Freshmen.) 

I.S. 202 Energy: The World 

Crisis 4 hours 

An analysis of the current scarcity of energy 
resources required for the modern industrial 
world: its historical and geographical 
context, its psychological, social and political 
ramifications, and its possible consequences. 
Alternative technological solutions will be 
examined and evaluated. (Not open to 
Freshmen.) 

I.S. 210 The Origins of Life 4 hours 
This interdisciplinary course focuses on the 
question "What is the probability that we, as 
humans, will encounter other life forms in 
the universe?". The main focus will concern 
the physical conditions necessary for the 
origin of life forms in the universe, 
particularly with respect to the origin of life 
on Earth. The history of ideas and concepts 
related to this question and a review of 
current theories and experimental work in 
this area will be covered. The economic, 
philosophical and attitudinal impact of this 
question on today's society will also be 
explored. This course is designed for those 
majoring in the Social Sciences and the 
Humanities, although it may be taken by 
those majoring in the Sciences. Appropriate 
laboratory experiences and demonstrations 
will be an integral part of the course. (Not 
open to Freshmen.) 



I.S. 487-488 
2 or 4 hours 



Independent Study 



I.S. 490 Senior Project 4-8 hours 



93 



Library 



Aims 

The T. W. Phillips Memorial Library 
provides a variety of educational 
services to the Bethany College 
community through an experienced and 
well-trained staff and a wealth of 
learning resources (see page 10). The 
librarians view their purpose in the 
following ways: to provide materials 
which support the Bethany curriculum 
and the individual projects of students, 
to encourage students to ask questions 
and to assist them in their search for 
answers through the teaching of 
bibliographic skills, to help students 
develop a love of books and an 
awareness of the vast amount of 
information available throughout the 
world, and to develop an understanding 
of the importance to individuals and to 
societies of having access to 
information. 



94 




Mathematics 



Aims 

To provide the general student with a 
knowledge of the foundations of 
mathematics; to give the prospective 
teacher an understanding and 
appreciation of the fundamental ideas 
of elementary mathematics; to provide 
a tool for the technical student; and to 
give the prospective graduate student a 
foundation for later study and research. 

Requirements for Field 
of Concentration 

The student is required to take the 
following 24 hours in the department: 
Math. 201, Calculus I; Math. 202, 
Calculus II; Math. 203, Calculus III; 
Math. 354, Linear Algebra; Math. 400, 
Abstract Algebra; Math. 401, Advanced 
Calculus. 

The student also must complete a 
Senior Project. Each student must take 
Computer Science 169. In addition, each 
student must complete one of the 
following tracks: 



Mathematics: Twelve hours from the 
following: Math. 326, 341, 344, 371, 
383, 384. 

Mathematics-Economics: Math. 231, 
281, Eco. 200, 241, 301, 302, 22 hours. 

Mathematics-Physics: Math. 341, 
Phys. 201, 202, 251 and 252; or Phys. 
261 and 262; 300, 22 hours. 

Mathematics-Computer Science: 

Sixteen hours from the following: Math. 
371, Com. Sci. 269, 270, 355, 360, 365. 

Mathematics-Education: Math. 103, 
201, 202, 203, 281, 326, 354, 400, 401, 
480, and Com. Sci. 169. 

Only students who have completed the 
Mathematics-Education track will be 
recommended for state certification to 
teach mathematics in secondary school. 
See the Education Department listings 
for required Professional Education 
courses. A second teaching field is 
required. 

Math. 103 Elementary Algebra 4 hours 
Designed to prepare the student to take 
Calculus I. Sets and operations on sets, 
number systems, solutions to equations, 
inequalities, functions and graphing, conic 
sections, synthetic division and the 
remainder theorem, exponential and 
logarithmic functions, computation with 
common logarithms. May not be taken if 
credit has been earned for Math 201 . 

Math. 104 Trigonometry 2 hours 
Radian measure, trigonometric functions 
and their graphs, fundamental identities, 
conditional trigonometric equations, inverse 
trigonometric functions, vectors, complex 
numbers, trigonometric form of complex 
numbers, DeMoivre's Theorem. The material 
covered in this course is necessary 
background for Math 202: Calculus II. 

Math. 141 Mathematics for the Liberal 
Arts Student 4 hours 
Introduces the non-science major to the 
spirit and flavor of mathematics. Stresses 
fundamental concepts with the aim of 
clarifying the importance of mathematics in 
relation to other branches of knowledge. 
Topics that may be covered include sets, 
logic, the number concept, history of 
mathematics, the nature and use of 
geometry, computers, computer 
programming, and logical puzzles. 



Math. 152 Finite Mathematics 4 hours 
Intended primarily for students of the 
biological or social sciences. It is also 
recommended for non-science majors 
desiring an acquaintance with mathematics. 
It is not a precalculus course. Concepts 
studied include logic, set theory, matrices, 
probability theory, linear programming, and 
game theory. 

Math. 201 Calculus I 4 hours 
Real number system, equations of a line, 
study of the circle and parabola, functions, 
limits, and continuity. Techniques of 
differentiation and integration applied to 
maximum and minimum problems and to 
related rates. Prerequisite: 3 l h years of high 
school math or Math. 103 or permission of 
the instructor. 

Math. 202 Calculus II 4 hours 
Area between two curves, volumes of 
revolution, moments, centroids, hydrostatic 
pressure, and work. Integration and 
differentiation of transcendental functions. 
Methods of integration including integration 
by parts, partial fractions, and trigonometric 
substitution. Polar coordinates and graphs, 
area, and angles of intersection in polar 
coordinates. Prerequisite: Math. 201 or 
advanced placement. 

Math. 203 Calculus III 4 hours 
Intermediate calculus with emphasis on 
vector methods and functions of several 
variables. Scalar and vector products. 
Partial differentiation and applications, 
directional derivative and gradient. Multiple 
integrals with physical applications. 
Expansion of functions. L'Hospital rule, 
sequences, and series. Prerequisite: Math. 
202. 



95 



Math. 225-226 Mathematics for 
Elementary Teachers 2 hours each 
The first course is a study of the 
fundamental principles and concepts of 
arithmetic. The second is a study of intuitive 
geometry. 

Math. 231 Operations Research 2 hours 
This course deals with applications of matrix 
algebra to business and economics, including 
problems involving cost minimization and 
profit maximization. (The necessary matrix 
algebra will be developed in the course.) 
Primarily designed for students who intend 
to pursue a career in business. Prerequisite: 
Math. 103 or equivalent. 

Math. 281 Statistical Methods 4 hours 
Introductory statistical analysis including 
frequency distribution and graphic 
presentation of data, measures of central 
tendency, relative positions in a distribution, 
variability, the normal curve and its 
applications, correlation and regression, 
probability and statistical inference, testing 
differences between means, introduction to 
analysis of variance. (Not open to students in 
the general program.) 

Math. 282 Statistical Methods II 2 hours 
Testing goodness of fit, contingency tables, 
regression and correlation analysis, analysis 
of variance, non-parametric methods. 




Math. 326 Introduction to Modern 
Geometry 4 hours 

Euclidean and non-Euclidean geometries; an 
introduction to synthetic projective 
geometry; the concept of limit and infinity; 
geometrical constructions, recent 
developments and theorems. Prerequisites: 
Math. 201, 202. 

Math. 341 Differential Equations 

4 hours 

Methods of solution of ordinary and partial 
differential equations and applications to the 
physical sciences. Prerequisite: Math. 202. 

Math. 344 Complex Variables 2 hours 
Complex numbers, elementary functions, 
analytic functions, contour integration, 
Taylor and Laurent series, conformal 
mapping, boundary value problems, 
Laplacian equations. Prerequisite: Math. 
203. 

Math. 354 Linear Algebra 4 hours 
Geometric vectors, matrices and linear 
equations, real vector spaces, linear 
transformations and matrices, and inner 
product spaces. 

Math. 371 Numerical Analysis 4 hours 
Numerical methods in evaluating integrals 
and differential equations. Techniques in 
finding the roots of polynomials and solving 
systems of linear equations and matrix 
manipulation. Basic and Fortran languages 
are used to apply the above methods. 



Math. 383 Probability & Statistics I 

4 hours 

Introduction to probability, basic distribution 
theory, limit theorems, mathematical 
expectation, probability densities, random 
variables, sampling distributions, point and 
interval estimation, tests of hypotheses, 
regression and correlation, analysis of 
variance. Prerequisite: Math. 202 or 
permission of the instructor. 

Math. 384 Probability & Statistics II 

2 hours 

In this course, the student will apply the 
concepts of probability to statistical 
procedures such as sampling estimations, 
tests of hypothesis, regression theory, and 
Bayesian methods. Prerequisite: Math. 383. 

Math. 400 Modern Abstract Algebra 

4 hours 

Groups, rings, integral domains, fields, and 

vector spaces. 

Math. 401 Advanced Calculus 4 hours 
The Jacobian, Lagrange multipliers, limits 
and continuity, completeness of the Real 
numbers, sequences, series, Fourier series 
and orthogonal functions, partial differential 
equations, Implicit Function Theorem. 
Prerequisite: Math. 203. 

Math. 480 Methods and Materials in 
Teaching Mathematics 2 hours 
Approved methods in teaching mathematics 
at the secondary level; class period activities 
of the teacher; procedures and devices in 
teaching; organization of materials, testing, 
aims, and modern trends. (May be taken for 
credit as Education 480.) 

Math. 487-488 Independent Study 2 or 4 

hours 

Math. 490 Senior Project 2-8 hours 



96 



Music 




Aims 

To afford students an opportunity of 
developing an understanding and 
appreciation of music; to relate that 
music to the cultural conditions of 
respective periods; to provide an 
integrated study of music theory, 
history, literature and performance; to 
provide the College and surrounding 
communities with stylistically sound 
performances; and to provide for the 
thorough training of musicians within 
the Liberal Arts program. 

Requirements for Field of 
Concentration in Music 
History, Theory and 
Literature 

Each student with a field of 
concentration in music history, theory 
and literature is required to complete a 
minimum of 38 hours in the Music 
Department, exclusive of the Senior 
Project. The following courses are 
required: Music 191, 192, 200, 210, 241, 
242, 350, 360, 477 and 8 hours in 
Applied Music of which a maximum of 2 
hours may be ensemble. 



97 



Requirements for Field of 
Concentration in Music 
Education 

Each student electing a field of 
concentration in music education and 
seeking certification as teachers in any 
state must fulfill the requirements for 
certification in West Virginia which 
amount to 53 hours in the Music 
Department exclusive of the Senior 
Project - seven more than may be 
counted toward a B.A. degree. The 
following courses are required: Music 
History and Theory: 191, 192, 200, 210, 
241, 242, 350, 360, 420 or 430; Applied 
Music: 153, 155, 157, 158, 159; Music 
Education 480, 481, 482 (480 may be 
counted as professional education); two 
hours of Piano (or proficiency 
examination); six hours of 
concentration in voice or any one 
instrument; two hours in an ensemble. 
Student teaching during the senior year 
is counted as professional education. 



Requirements for Field of 
Concentration in Music 
Performance 

Each student electing the field of 
concentration in music performance 
must meet the standard proficiency 
requirements as may be determined by 
the Music Department. Each student is 
required to complete a minimum of 40 
hours, exclusive of the Senior Project. 
The following courses are required: 
Music 191, 192, 200, 241, 242, 350, 477 
and 16 hours of concentration in voice 
or instrument. In addition, each student 
will be required to present a senior 
recital of at least one hour in length, 
which may be counted as the Senior 
Project. It is recommended that 
students also take Music 210. 

Performance and 
Participation Requirements 

All students with a field of 
concentration in any of the three areas 
of music must participate in at least two 
recognized performance groups each 
semester for at least six semesters. All 
students must attend a minimum of 10 
student and/or major recitals on 
campus. All students taking private 
lessons will perform for a jury of music 
faculty near the end of each semester. 
Selected students will perform in 
student recitals held once a semester; 
all will perform in a minimum of four 
student recitals as a requirement for 
graduation. 

History and Theory of Music 

Mus. 103 Understanding Music 4 hours 
A general listener's approach to classical and 
popular music from its early beginnings to the 
present. Aural and historical perspective will 
be emphasized. A survey of major musicians 
within the various genres to aid in developing a 
comprehensive appreciation of music. This 
course is designed for students with little or no 
musical background. 

Mus. 110 Introduction to Music as an Art 
and Science 2 hours 
Designed to aid the student in recognizing, 
reproducing and recording simple melodic and 
rhythmic patterns, this course will examine the 
elements of tonal relationships, simple 



rhythms, intervals, melodies in both major and 
minor scales, recognition of orchestral 
instruments, the historical significance of form 
and vocal music. 

Mus. 191-192 Theory and Ear Training 

4 hours each 

The study of the rudiments of the structure of 
music and the basic disciplines of music theory 
and four-part harmony with an emphasis on 
solfege through dictation, sight singing and 
simple keyboard exercises. 

Mus. 200 Advanced Theory and Ear 
Training 4 hours 

Comprehensive extension of Music 192. 
Intensive study of 17th and 18th century 
harmonic practices. Introduction to 
characteristics of later harmonic styles. 
Continued emphasis upon aural skills. 

Mus. 210 Counterpoint 4 hours 
A study of the basic principles of writing two, 
three and four voice counterpoint and their 
application in smaller forms of composition. 
Prerequisite: Music 200 

Mus. 241 Music History: Medieval to the 
18th Century 4 hours 
A detailed examination of music and its 
heritage as it evolved from the medieval period 
to the 18th century with emphasis upon 
representative composers from each. 

Mus. 242 Music History: 18th Century to 
the Present 4 hours 
A detailed examination of music and its 
heritage as it evolved from the 18th century to 
the present, with emphasis upon 
representative composers from each. 

Mus. 270-290 Studies in Music 

Mus. 272 Keyboard Music: A Survey 

2 hours 

A survey of the development of music for 
organ, harpsichord and piano from the late 
15th through 20th centuries. Emphasis upon 
the growth of the instruments and their 
importance within various musical styles. 



98 



Mus. 274 The Lied: Its History and 
Development 2 hours 
Comprehensive survey of the development of 
the lied as a genre. Emphasis upon Schubert, 
Schumann and Brahms and their influence 
upon this style of composition. 

Mus. 275 Choral Masterpieces 2 hours 
Examination of the great secular and sacred 
vocal genres of the 17th through 20th 
centuries; oratorio, cantata, motet and passion. 
Emphasis upon Handel, Mendelssohn and 
contemporary composers. 

Mus. 277 The History of Jazz 2 hours 
A survey of the history of Jazz from its 
African, Cuban and American Black origins 
through Ragtime and related styles. 
Contemporary popular music including 
Rock, Swing and Bop included. 

Mus. 280 Beethoven: Romanticism and 
the 19th Century 2 hours 
The study of the music and style of 
Beethoven and his influence upon the music 
of the 19th century. A survey of developing 
musical styles of the 19th century. 

Mus. 281 Stravinsky and the 20th 
Century 2 hours 

Biographical study of Stravinsky and the 
musical styles developed in the 20th century 
from Impressionists through Aleatoric and 
Experimental composers. The use of various 
electronic devices and their influence upon 
music composition since World War II. 

Mus. 350 Form and Analysis 2 hours 
Intense study of musical form as it 
developed from the 17th to the 20th 
centuries. Harmonic and stylistic analysis of 
keyboard, instrumental and vocal forms. 
Prerequisite: Music 192. 

Mus. 360 Harmonic Practices of the 20th 
Century 2 hours 

Comprehensive study and analysis of 
harmonic practices used by composers in 
various media since 1900. Students will be 
provided the opportunity of writing short 
musical examples based upon these 
principles. Prerequisite: Music 200. 



Mus. 410 Orchestration 2 hours 
The study and arrangement of music for 
various instrumental ensembles. 

Mus. 420 Instrumental Conducting 

2 hours 

Styidy will include score reading and the 
many techniques of baton use. Students will 
have the opportunity to experience 
conducting one or more of the college 
instrumental groups. 

Mus. 430 Choral Conducting 2 hours 
This course offers the opportunity of 
conducting one or more of the college choral 
groups. The emphasis of this course will be 
upon rehearsal techniques, vocal balancing, 
score reading and analysis of vocal 
problems. 

Mus. 477 Senior Seminar 2 hours 
Reading, criticism, listening and research 
designed to review and correlate a student's 
work in the Music Department. 

Mus. 480 Methods and Materials in 
Teaching Music in Secondary 
Schools 4 hours 

Analysis of music offered in senior and 
junior high schools throughout the U.S. 
Consideration of problems, objectives, and 
materials in teaching vocal and instrumental 
music, theory, and appreciation courses in 
secondary schools. Opportunities for 
developing practical teaching projects. (May 
be taken for credit as Education 480.) 

Mus. 481 Methods and Materials in 
Teaching Elementary Schools I 2 hours 
The aims and values of elementary school 
music will be studied, opportunities to 
develop teaching techniques will be 
provided, and introductions to standard 
materials will be made. Required of all 
elementary education majors. 

Mus. 482 Methods and Materials in 
Teaching Elementary Schools II 2 hours 
A continuation of Music 481. Required of all 
students with a field of concentration in 
music education. 

Mus. 487-488 Independent Study 

2-4 hours 

Individual study in the areas of music 
history, style, theory or performance 
practice in which the student is qualified to 
work independently. Independent study is 
offered only in areas not included in other 
courses in the Music Department. 
Prerequisites: Adequate preparation to 
undertake the study as determined by the 
instructor, and permission of the head of the 
department. 



Mus. 490 Senior Project 2-4 hours 
During the junior year each music major 
must present for the approval of the 
department a prospectus for a major project 
in performance, research or the history of a 
specific area of music. During the senior 
year the music major must successfully 
complete this project and defend it in oral or 
written form. Acceptable projects include a 
solo performance at least one hour in length; 
the research of an area of performance 
practice within a particular period; a lecture 
recital; or a study of a specific aspect of 
music history or education. 

Applied Music 

Mus. 115-116 Madrigal Ensemble 1 hour 
Preparation for performance of madrigal and 
other smaller group choral music for advanced 
voices. Membership limited: enrollment by 
audition. 

Mus. 125-126 Concert Choir 1 hour 
Preparation for performance of standard 
choral literature both sacred and secular. 
Enrollment by audition. 

Mus. 127-128 Glee Club 1 hour 
Study and preparation for performance of 
choral repertoire for bass, baritone and tenor. 
Membership limited; enrollment by audition. 
Auditions open to all students. 

Mus. 131-132 Wind Ensemble 1 hour 
Study and preparation for performance of 
music for wind instruments from the 17th 
through 20th centuries. Enrollment by 
audition. 

Mus. 133-134 Band 1 hour 
An ensemble of wind and percussion 
instruments which plays for festive and athletic 
events of the College. Enrollment by 
permission of the director. 



99 



Mus. 135-136 Chamber Ensemble 1 hour 
Study and preparation for performance of the 
standard chamber literature; quartets, trios 
and other works according to the 
instrumentalists available. Enrollment by 
audition. 

Mus. 137-138 Jazz Band 1 how- 
Study and preparation for performance of 
arrangements for large jazz band. Designed to 
develop an appreciation for the musical styles 
of Glenn Miller, Woody Herman, Stan 
Kenton, and others. Enrollment by audition. 

Mus. 153 Fundamentals of Voice 1 hour 
Class instruction in the rudiments of vocal 
technique, theory and the principles of diction. 
Designed for those with no previous vocal 
experience. 

Mus. 154 Fundamentals of Guitar 1 hour 
Class instruction in the rudiments of guitar. 
Open to those with minimal experience. Theory 
and literature will be emphasized. 

Mus. 155 Fundamentals of Strings 1 hour 
Class instruction in the rudiments of all the 
string instruments. Preparation of simple 
compositions of each instrument. 

Mus. 157 Fundamentals of Woodwinds 

1 hour 

Class instruction in the rudiments of all the 
woodwind instruments. Preparation of simple 
compositions for each instrument. 



Mus. 158 Fundamentals of Brass 1 hour 
Class instruction in the rudiments of all the 
brass instruments. Preparation of simple 
compositions for each instrument. 

Mus. 159 Fundamentals of Percussion 

1 hour 

Class instruction in the rudiments of all the 

percussion instruments. Preparation of 

compositions for the major percussion 

instruments. 

Mus. 161-162 Harpsichord 1-2 hours each 
Private instruction in the techniques, literature 
and history of the harpsichord. Enrollment by 
permission of the instructor. 

Mus. 163-164 Pipe Organ 1-2 hours each 
Private instruction in the techniques, theory 
and literature of the pipe organ. 
Prerequisites: proficiency on the piano 
equivalent to the Bach Inventions, early 
sonatas of Beethoven, Haydn or Mozart. 
Enrollment by permission of the instructor. 

Mus. 165-166 Piano 1-2 hours each 
Private instruction in the techniques, theory 
and literature of the piano. Enrollment by 
the permission of the instructor. 

Mus. 167-168 Strings 1-2 hours each 
Private instruction in the techniques, theory 
and literature of violin, viola, cello or bass. 
Enrollment by permission of the instructor. 

Mus. 169-170 Classical Guitar 1-2 hours 

each 

Private instruction in the techniques, theory 

and literature of classical guitar. Enrollment 

by permission of the instructor. 

Mus. 171-172 Winds 1-2 hours each 
Private instruction in the techniques, theory 
and literature of the brass and woodwind 
instruments. Enrollment by permission of 
the instructor. 

Mus. 173-174 Voice 1-2 hours each 
Private instruction in the technique, theory 
and literature of voice. Open to all students 
who have adequate native ability. 
Enrollment by permission of the instructor. 

Mus. 361-362 Advanced Harpsichord 

1-2 hours each 

Private instruction to advanced students in 
harpsichord. Prerequisites: students who can 
demonstrate satisfactorily their ability to 
play compositions equivalent to: Bach 
Preludes and Fugues, Scarlatti sonatas. 
Enrollment by permission of the instructor. 



Mus. 363-364 Advanced Pipe Organ 

1-2 hours each 

Private instruction to advanced students in 
organ. Prerequisites: students who can 
demonstrate satisfactorily their ability to 
play compositions equivalent to: Bach 
Prelude and Fugue in G, D, Fantasia and 
Fugue in A, C Minor, G Minor, Widor 
Symphonies, Vierne Symphonies, early 
works of Langlais, Hindemith, Messaien. 
Enrollment by permission of the instructor. 

Mus. 365-366 Advanced Piano 1-2 hours 
each 

Private instruction to advanced students in 
piano. Prerequisites: Students who can 
demonstrate satisfactorily their ability to 
play compositions equivalent to: Beethoven 
sonatas, Mozart and Haydn sonatas, Bach 
Preludes and Fugues, and works of Debussy. 
Enrollment by permission of the instructor. 

Mus. 367-368 Advanced Strings 

1-2 hours each 

Private instruction to advanced students in 
strings. Prerequisites: students who can 
demonstrate satisfactorily their ability to 
play compositions equivalent to: Kreutzer 
Etudes, DeBeriot Concerti for violin. 
Enrollment by permission of the instructor. 

Mus. 371-372 Advanced Winds 1-2 hours 
each 

Private instruction to advanced students in 
wind instruments. Prerequisites: students 
who can demonstrate satisfactorily their 
ability to play compositions equivalent to 
those generally listed as grades 4 through 6. 
Enrollment by permission of the instructor. 

Mus. 373-374 Advanced Voice 1-2 hours 
each 

Private instruction to advanced students in 
voice. Open only to students who have 
completed at least four semesters of voice, 
can read at sight, have adequate use of at 
least one modern foreign language, and can 
demonstrate the ability to perform pieces 
equivalent in difficulty to standard operatic 
and lieder literature. Enrollment by 
permission of the instructor. 



100 




Philosophy 



Aims 

To assist the student in discovering and 
developing sound bases for interpreting 
self and society through a careful 
examination of his or her beliefs, 
actions, and claims to knowledge; to 
assist the student in becoming aware of 
the nature and status of philosophical 
problems, commitments, ideologies, and 
models that serve as the foundation of 
human life; and to provide the student 
who expects to pursue graduate studies 
in philosophy with a sound basis in the 
major areas of the field. 

Requirements for Field 
of Concentration 

Concentration in philosophy may hold 
promise for several students as one way 
to approach a liberal education. For 
others, philosophy may be an important 
related field; or it may serve as a good 
foundation for those planning for 
graduate work in another field as well 
as for those who are professionally 
interested in philosophy. 



101 



Concentration in philosophy requires 
satisfactory completion of a minimum 
of 24 hours, including Philosophy 123, 
124, 323, 324, 325, plus a Senior 
Project, and Senior Comprehensive 
Examination. The Senior Project is 
received and evaluated in the final 
semester of the student's academic 
program. 

The student who is considering 
graduate work should be aware that 
many good graduate programs in 
philosophy require a reading knowledge 
of French and German. 

Phil. 100 Introduction to Philosophy 

4 hours 

Intended primarily to involve students in an 
introductory exploration into the range of 
problems with which philosophers wrestle. 
"Living issues" confront us in such vital 
areas as: the nature of self, man, mind, 
values, knowing, freedom, and of philosophy, 
philosophic outlooks, and religious 
traditions. 

Phil. 123 Basic Logic 4 hours 
Students are assisted in developing the 
ability to recognize the differences between 
emotional intensity and valid argument, 
between verbal disputes and conclusions 
that follow (logically) from premises. 



Recognition of the bases of these differences 
and development of the very practical 
abilities to recognize, construct, and analyze 
various forms of argument and to detect 
logical errors (fallacies) are important 
objectives of the course. 

Phil. 124 Ethics: Personal and Social 

4 hours 

Examination of different personal and social 
foundations upon which ethics or morals can 
be (and have been) built - such as pleasure, 
happiness, feeling, reason, obligation, 
usefulness, and relativism; significant moral 
problems in several areas of life and work; 
and basic criteria for moral decision-making. 

Phil. 250-259 Special Topics in 
Philosophy 2 or 4 hours 

Phil. 252 Philosophy of Mysticism 

4 hours 

Examination of what is involved in the 
experience and claims of several mystical 
groups or representatives, from ancient to 
contemporary times. Emphasis will focus on 
trying to understand the basic claims that 
mystics make, assessing the kinds of 
certainty, truth and insight claimed, and 
exploring the place of "the mystical" in 
human experience. 

Phil. 323 Ancient and Medieval 
Philosophy 4 hours 

Begins with the seventh century B.C. Greek 
mythic interpretations and moves through 
early Nature Philosophies, Scepticism, 
Greek Humanism, the Golden Age, the 
Roman Period, and the relationship of 
religion and philosophy in the Medieval 
Period. 

Phil. 324 Modern Philosophy: From the 
Renaissance Through the 19th 
Century 4 hours 

Begins with the New Learning and moves 
through the rise of "the scientific spirit," the 
development of British Empiricism and 
Continental Rationalism, Kant's 
"revolutionary" impact on philosophy, and 
the major thought forms of the 19th 
Century. 

Phil. 325 Twentieth Century 

Philosophies 4 hours 

A survey of the dominant philosophic forms 

from Bergson, Dewey and Whitehead 

through the rise of realism, logical analysis, 

phenomenology -existentialism and language 

studies. 



Phil. 350-359 Advanced Topics in 
Philosophy 2 or 4 hours 

Phil. 353 History and Philosophy of 

Science 4 hours 

(See General Science 209.) 

Phil. 355 Philosophy of Religion 2 or 4 

hours 

Examination of the major aspects of religion 
from a philosophic perspective. Study will 
include: the religious experience, the 
meaning and significance of faith, belief and 
criteria, knowledge, proof, evidence and 
certainty, concept of deity, scope and impact 
of religion in human life. 

Phil. 358 Aesthetics, The Arts, and 
Philosophy 2 or 4 hours 
Examination of the nature of aesthetic 
experience and its relation to other kinds of 
experience, as well as its place in art 
production, appreciation and creativity; the 
notion of "a work of art"; language used in 
description, interpretation, and evaluation of 
art; and different interpretations of 
aesthetics. Opportunities are provided for 
giving special attention to particular art 
areas as well as to "the Arts." 

Phil. 477-478 Senior Seminar 2 hours 
each 

This seminar seldom consists of a general 
review of all areas of philosophy; the topic or 
particular area of study is chosen as a result 
of student and faculty conferences. Student 
ability, interest, and need are important 
factors. Conferences with and permission of 
the head of the department are required 
before enrollment. 

Phil. 487-488 Independent Study 2 or 4 

hours each 

Phil. 490 Senior Project 2-8 hours 



102 




Physical 
Education 



Aims 

To enhance the health of the student; to 
provide opportunities for students to 
participate and develop proficiency in 
sport activities; and to prepare students 
for professional careers in physical 
education, recreation, athletic coaching 
in educational, agency and/or municipal 
institutions, and sports communication. 

Requirements for Field 
of Concentration - 
Physical Education 

A minimum of 44 hours in the 
department, which must include P.E. 
101, 110, 226, 243, 244, 310, 426, 427, 
479, 480, 481, 486, and 490 or their 
equivalents. Additionally, all students 
must take Biology 100 and 167, as well 
as Education 201 and 202. 

Optional Program Opportunities: 
1. To be recommended for state 
certification, K-12 students must 
complete the requirements for the 
field of concentration. Electives 
chosen should include four hours 



103 



selected from RE. 309, 340, 355, 380, 
390, two hours elective in each of the 
following: individual-dual and field- 
court, and four hours elective clinics. 
See the Education Department 
listings for the required Professional 
Education courses. A second teaching 
field is required. 

2. lb be recommended for state 
certification 7-9 or 7-12, a minimum of 
34 hours in Physical Education is 
required. This must include the 
following: PE. 101, 110, 226, 243, 244, 
426, 427, 479, 480; four hours selected 
from PE. 309, 340, 355, 380, 390; two 
hours of elective in each of the 
following: individual-dual and field 
court, and four hours elective clinics. 
Students also must complete Bio. 100 
and 167. See the Education 
Department listings for required 
Professional Education courses. A 
second field is required. 

3. For non-physical education majors, 
an emphasis in coaching is available. 
Eighteen hours are required which 
must include Biology 167, PE. 355, 
340, 485, and two hours selected from 
PE. 300-305. Electives include PE. 
243, 244, 426 or 427. 



Requirements for Field 
of Concentration — 
Leisure Studies 

A. Leisure Management - A minimum 
of 38 hours in the department which 
must include 110, 120, 167, 226, 243, 
244, 280, 290, 385, 386, 426, 427, 476, 
490 and two hours of performance. 
Additionally, all students must take 
Biology 100; Economics 200, 241, 280, 
290, 311. 

B. Leisure Services - A minimum of 
44 hours in the department which must 
include 110, 120, 167, 226, 243, 244, 280, 
290, 309, 385, 386, 426, 427, 476, 480, 
490, and two hours of performance. 
Additionally, all students must take 
Biology 100; Economics 200, 241, 280; 
Art 340; Music 101 and two hours of 
Theatre. 

The following courses are 
recommended: Soc. 361, 362; Pol. Sci. 
226; Bio. 230 S. 

A department-approved internship in 
leisure field is required. Advanced 
courses in Leisure Studies, PE. 280, 
290, 385, 386, and 476, will begin to be 
offered regularly in 1981. 

Activity Performance 
Requirements 

(Physical Education Majors) 

Each student is expected to show 
proficiency in a minimum of 11 different 
activities which cover each of the seven 
activity areas. The following levels of 
proficiency are expected prior to 
student teaching: 

A. Competency Level I in six activities. 

B. Competency Level II in three 
activities, which differ from those in 
Level I. 

C. Competency Level III in two 
activities, which differ in proficiency 
from those on Competency Level I or 
II. Each Competency Level may be 
obtained by previous participation 
experiences, i.e., high school athletics. 



RE. 100-165 Physical Education 
Performance Courses 

Skills in performances, knowledge of 
strategies, rules, equipment and methods, 
and participation in sport forms. For non- 
majors, a maximum of four hours may be 
credited toward graduation requirements. 
Specific requirements of majors, six hours 
(excluding RE. 150-163), but not to exceed 10 
hours. 

Courses Available 

P.E. 101 Gymnastics 

P.E. 110 Aquatics (Senior Life Saving) 

P.E. Ill Swimming (Basic - Advanced) 

P.E. 120 Folk Dance 

PE. 121 Horseback Riding 

P.E. 130 Golf - Handball - Paddle Ball 

P.E. 132 Archery - Table Tennis 

P.E. 134 Body Mechanics 

P.E. 135 Tennis - Badminton 

P.E. 137 Modern Dance - Rhythms 

P.E. 139 Physical Fitness 

P.E. 140 Field Hockey - Softball 

P.E. 141 Aerobics 

P.E. 142 Track & Field - Wrestling 

P.E. 144 Soccer - Volleyball 

P.E. 146 Football - Wrestling 

P.E. 150 Varsity Baseball 

P.E. 151 Varsity Basketball (M) 

P.E. 152 Varsity Basketball (W) 

P.E. 153 Varsity Cross Country 

P.E. 154 Varsity Field Hockey 

PE. 155 Varsity Football 

P.E. 156 Varsity Golf 

P.E. 157 Varsity Soccer 

P.E. 158 Varsity Swimming 

P.E. 159 Varsity Tennis (M) 

P.E. 160 Varsity Tennis (W) 

PE. 161 Varsity Track 

P.E. 162 Varsity Volleyball 

P.E. 163 Varsity Softball 



104 



Recommended Sequence of Courses for Physical Education 
Majors 



First Semester 



Credit Second Semester 



Credit 



Freshman 












Bio. 100 


Animal Biology 


4 


Bio. 167 


Introduction to Mammalian Anatomy 
and Physiology 


2 








Psych. 100 


General Psychology 


4 








P.E.- 


Performance Courses (100-170) 


2 


Sophomore 

RE. 226 


First Aid 


2 


RE. 244 


Philosophical-Historical Perspective * 


4 


Ed. 201 


Human Development & Learning I 


4 


Ed. 202 


Human Development & Learning II 


4 


RE. 243 


Socio- Psychological Perspective* 


4 


Ed. 249 


Participation in Secondary Schools 


2 


P.E.- 


Performance Courses (100-170) 


2 


P.E.- 


Performance Courses (100-170) 


2 


Junior 












RE. 479 


Teaching Physical Education I 


4 


RE. 426 


Kinesiology 


2 


RE. 310 


Adapted Physical Education 


2 


RE. 427 


Physiology 


2 


RE. 110 


Aquatics 


1 


RE. 480 


Teaching Physical Education II 


4 


P.E.- 


Clinic (300-308) 


2 


RE. 481 


Elementary School Physical Education 


2 


P.E.- 


Performance (100-160) 


2 


RE. 101 


Gymnastics 


1 


Senior 












Ed. 333 


Educational Psychology 


2 


RE. 486 


Issues in Sport 


2 


Ed. 401 


History and Philosophy 


2 


RE. 490 


Senior Project 


2-8 


Ed. 428 
Ed. 470 


Principles and Techniques of 
Secondary Education 

Observation and Directed Teaching 


4 
8 


P.E.- 
P.E.- 


Elective 
Clinic (300-308) 


2-4 

2 



*RE. 243-244 may be taken in the freshman year but Soc. 100, Psych. 100, and/or Phil. 100 are recommended as prerequisites. 



105 




RE. 167 Introduction to Mammalian 
Anatomy and Physiology 4 hours 
(See Biology 167.) 

P.E. 200-225 Physical Education 
Performance Courses 1 hour each 
Advanced skills in performance, advanced 
knowledge of rules, equipment and methods; 
participation in sport forums. Open to non- 
majors. Prerequisite: successful completion 
of 100 level performance course. 

Courses Available 

RE. 201 Gymnastics 

RE. 210 Aquatics WSI 

RE. 222 Archery - Table Tennis 

RE. 224 Tennis - Badminton 

RE. 226 First Aid as Related to the 
Principles of Biology 2 hours 
(See Biology 105.) 



P.E. 227 Personal and Community 
Health 4 hours 

Fundamental knowledge of personal and 
community health matters pertaining to the 
social group: communicable diseases, vital 
statistics, and legal and social regulations. 

P.E. 243 Socio- Psychological Perspective 

4 hours 

Consideration of small sport groups as 
micro-social systems; application of group 
dynamics theory and small group research to 
the study of sport groups; investigation of 
the influence of group member 
characteristics, environmental factors, 
interpersonal relations, and group structural 
characteristics on individual member 
adjustment and group effectiveness. 
Designed to investigate those aspects of 
psychology which influence the performance 
and the participant in sport. Additional 
factors such as motives, arousal, aggression, 
and other socio-psychological variables will 
be covered. 

P.E. 244 Philosophical-Historical 
Perspective 4 hours 

Philosophical inquiry into physical education. 
Consideration given to general philosophical 
interpretation of the nature and purpose of 
physical education. Review of the historical 
and philosophical changes in American 
education with emphasis on the developing 
roles of professional physical education. 

P.E. 280 Leisure in Socio-Cultural 
Patterns 4 hours 

Leisure philosophies in the history of man; 
leisure values reflected in the culture; 
factors affecting leisure such as 
demography, technology, and population; 
social meaning and scope of leisure. 

P.E. 290 Leisure and Human Behavior 

4 hours 

Motivation and leisure behavior; 
physiological and activity outcomes; man as 
a social organism; emergence of leadership 
in leisure pursuits. 

RE. 300-308 Clinics 2 hours each 
The major purpose of the sport clinic is to 
prepare a student to teach the sport or 
activity(ies) within any phase of the total 
school environment. Emphasis should be 
placed on theory (e.g. football theory) and 
teaching methodology(ies), both skill and 
theory. Skill advancement should not be an 
objective of a sport clinic but may be an 
outcome. 



Courses: 

P.E. 300 Basketball-Tennis-Golf 2 

P.E. 301 Aquatics-Baseball 2 

P.E. 302 Track & Field-Soccer 2 

P.E. 303 Football -Wrestling 2 

P.E. 304 Field Hockey-Volleyball 2 

P. E. 305 Games and Sports for Children 2 

P.E. 306 Gymnastics 2 

P.E. 309 Intramural Sports 2 hours 
Organization, administration, and objectives 
of the intramural athletic programs. 

P.E. 310 Adapted Physical Education 

2 hours 

Variations of the normal types of the human 
organism at different age levels; therapeutic 
measures, especially those which correct 
mechanical defects. 

P.E. 340 Prevention and Care of Injuries 

2 hours 

Common hazards of play and athletics. 
Preventive measures and treatment of 
injuries. Red Cross First Aid Certificate 
may be earned by those who pass the 
examination. Laboratory fee: $30. 

P.E. 350 Sports Information 2 hours 
Examination of the varied duties and 
functions of the sports information director. 
Special emphasis will be on writing general 
press releases, fact sheets, and special 
features; special team and individual 
promotions, and proper press box 
procedures, statistics and reporting results. 
Some attention will be given to photography 
and use of media. 

RE. 355 Coaching Sport 2 hours 
Basic philosophy and principles of athletics 
as integral parts of physical education and 
general education. State, local and national 
regulations and recommendations related to 
athletics; legal considerations; function and 
organization of leagues and athletic 
associations; personal standards and 
responsibilities of the coach as a leader; 
public relations; general safety procedures; 
general principles of budgets, records, 
purchasing and facilities. 



106 



P.E. 380 Introduction to Recreation 

2 hours 

Theory of recreation and its role in 

increased leisure. Recreation as a profession. 

P.E. 385 Fundamentals of Camping 

2 hours 

History and philosophy of camping; 
organization of established camping 
principles and applied techniques of 
camping; supervision of counselorship in 
established camps. 

P.E. 386 Therapeutic Use of Leisure 

2 hours 

Leisure activities for the maintenance of 
healthy levels of fitness within limitations of 
disability; physical and social skills directed 
toward rehabilitation; meeting needs of 
disabled individuals based upon abilities, 
interests, limitations and psycho-social 
characteristics. 

P.E. 390 Recreation Leadership 2 hours 
Philosophy of American recreation and 
community organization for leisure time 
activities. Recreational activities, practice in 
the leadership of games, informal dramatics, 
rhythmics, camp craft, and playground 
activities, with a two-hour lab for 
handcrafts. 

P.E. 426 Kinesiology 2 hours 
Anatomy and mechanics applied in the study 
of the human body during physical exercise; 
with special emphasis on the analysis of 
motion in specific sports skills and exercise 
patterns. Prerequisite: Biology 167. 

P.E. 427 Physiology of Muscular Activity 

2 hours 

Anatomy and physiology applied in the 
study of the human body during physical 
exercise; with special emphasis on the 
application of physiological variables in 
specific sports skills and exercise patterns. 
Prerequisite: Biology 167. 



P.E. 470 Contemporary Problems in 
Health 2 hours 

Study of current health problems, including 
mental health, nutrition, accidents, physical 
fitness, and drug education. 

P.E. 471 Planned Family and Sex 
Education 2 hours 
Methods and techniques of teaching sex 
education in the educational system, 
including such topics as dating, marriage 
adjustments, pregnancy and the 
reproductive systems, family planning and 
fertility control, and divorce. 

P.E. 476 Management and Organization 
of Leisure Services 2 hours 
Treatment of management principles and 
practices and personnel administration: 
development of management skills; overview 
of personality and motivation theories 
serves as a basic focus. Analysis of leisure 
organizations, including theoretical concepts 
of organizational planning, goal-setting, 
executing, and evaluating. Mode of 
motivation and the impact of individual and 
group structure. 

P.E. 479-480 Teaching Physical 
Education I & II 4 hours each 
Analysis of current methods, materials and 
techniques pertinent to teaching and 
administering physical education and 
athletics. Development of an understanding 
of the formative and summative evaluation 
process in the cognitive, affective and 
psychomotor domains of physical education. 
Emphasis is given to data-collection 
techniques (measurement), data- 
manipulation (statistics), data evaluation and 
data interpretation in view of teaching. 
Integration of administrative processes and 
techniques with teaching and evaluation. 
Must be taken in sequence. 

P.E. 481 Elementary School Physical 
Education 2 hours 
Teaching physical education at the 
elementary level. A study of this age group's 
physical, motor, social, and emotional 
development, plus activities contributing to 
proper physical development. 

P.E. 485 Participation in Coaching 

2 hours 

Required participation and scheduled 
seminars for those with no coaching 
experience. Student is assigned for a sport 
season to assist in coaching at the 




interscholastic or intercollegiate level. 
Assignment of students shall be dependent 
on master of the sport. Prerequisite: 
Permission of the department head. 

P.E. 486 Issues in Sport 2 hours 
Analysis of the origins, effects, and 
implications of current developments in 
theoretical aspects of physical education, 
sport, and leisure. Description and 
explanation of the nature and purpose of 
sport activities in relation to their conduct in 
an education, leisure and/or athletic setting. 
Includes discussion, directed reading and 
individual study related to the impact of 
issues, concepts and trends in the areas of 
education, leisure or athletics. 

P.E. 487-488 Independent Study 

2 or 4 hours each 

P.E. 490 Senior Project 2-8 hours 



107 




Physics 



Aims 

To introduce students to the current 
body of knowledge expressing the 
physicist's concepts of the universe and 
its physical laws; to provide courses 
serving the needs of liberal arts 
students who are concentrating in 
physics or are interested in the physical 
and life sciences, medicine, optometry, 
therapy, engineering, or teaching. 
Students may choose from a variety of 
courses to satisfy a distribution 
requirement, to attain enough 
competence for a future career in a 
related field, or to attain sufficient 
breadth and depth to pursue an 
advanced degree in physics. 

Requirements for Field 
of Concentration 

A minimum of 36 hours in the 
department, including Physics 201, 202, 
251, 252, 261, 262, 300, 301, 314, 316, 
318, and either 305-306 or 303, plus a 
Senior Project. Those students 
expecting to do graduate work are 
urged to take Physics 221, 222, and 
both 305-306 and 303. Mathematics and 
chemistry are strongly recommended as 
related fields. 

A combined plan with Columbia 
University, a dual-degree program with 
Georgia Institute of Technology, and a 
Three-Two Plan with Washington 
University are available to students 
interested in various engineering or 
industrial management degrees. Special 
programs are offered in cooperation 
with the Education Department for 
students interested in meeting the 
demand for teachers of physics, 
particularly in upper middle and 
secondary schools. The required courses 
in the Physics Department are the 
following 28 hours: Physics 201, 202, 



221, 251, 261-262, 300, 301. See the 
Education Department listings for 
additional required courses in that 
department. A second teaching field is 
required. Additional courses in 
Computer Science, General Science and 
Physics are suggested for additional 
interest. 

Students interested in careers in 
engineering, industrial management, 
mathematical modeling, etc., which 
might require a background in physics- 
mathematics-economics-chemistry, are 
encouraged to speak to the appropriate 
department head and the director of the 
dual degree engineering program, or to 
the director of interdisciplinary studies 
if they wish to design an 
interdisciplinary program of study more 
suited to their career goals than a 
traditional departmental program. 

Phys. 101-102 Introductory Physics 

4 hours each 

First semester: mechanics, heat, and wave 
phenomena. Second semester: electricity 
and magnetism, light, and selected topics in 
atomic and nuclear physics. The 
presentation is suitable for students whose 
mathematical preparation goes no further 
than algebra and the elements of 
trigonometry. No calculus is used. Three 
hours of lecture and two hours of lab each 
week. 

Phys. 201-202 General Physics 

4 hours each 

Subject areas covered are the same as in 
Phys. 101-102. However, the general level of 
sophistication is higher, the scope broader, 
and calculus is used. Specifically intended 
for science and engineering students taking 
at least a concurrent course in calculus. 
Three hours of lecture and two hours of lab 
each week. 

Phys. 221 Introductory Electronics 

4 hours 

Introduction to electrical and electronic 
circuits and their elements, with an 
emphasis on applications. Prerequisite: 
Phys. 101-102 or Phys. 201-202, or permission 
of the head of the department. 

Phys. 222 Digital Electronics 4 hours 
An introduction to digital electronics with 
applications in instrumentation and 
computer electronics. Topics include Boolean 



Algebra, basic gates, logic families, 
encoders-decoders, astable/monostable 
multivibrators, flip-flops, counters, readouts, 
shift registers, bi-directional bus structure, 
serial-parallel/parallel-serial data conversion, 
D to A and A to D conversion. Three hours 
of lecture and two hours of lab each week. 
Prerequisite: Math 103 or equivalent or 
permission of the head of the department. 

Phys. 251 Mechanics I 4 hours 
Particle mechanics; central force motions; 
motions of rigid bodies; free, forced, and 
coupled oscillations; rotations about an axis; 
moving coordinate systems; conservation 
theorems. Prerequisite: Phys. 201-202 or 
permission of the head of the department. 

Phys. 252 Mechanics II 2 hours 
Lagrange's equations, relativistic mechanics, 
mechanics of continuous media, and theory 
of small vibrations. Prerequisite: Phys251. 

Phys. 261 Electricity and Magnetism I 

2 hours 

Electrostatics, magnetostatics, and scalar 
and vector fields. Prerequisite: Phys. 201-202 
or permission of the head of the department. 

Phys. 262 Electricity and Magnetism II 

4 hours 

Multi-pole expansion of the potential, 
Poynting's vector, electrodynamics, 
Maxwell's equations, boundary conditions, 
and wave propagation. Prerequisite: 
Phys. 261. 

Phys. 300 Modern Physics 4 hours 
A presentation, based on mathematical and 
physical reasoning, of the foundations of 
modern physics. Treats the subjects of 
special relativity, kinetic theory, atomic 
theory, and introductory quantum mechanics 



on the level of the Schroedinger equation. 
Intended for chemistry, mathematics, 
physics, or pre-engineering majors. 
Prerequisite: Phys. 201-202 or permission of 
the head of the department. 

Phys. 301 Advanced Physics Lab I 

2 hours 

Offered concurrently with Phys. 300 to 
provide more experience with problem 
solving and to provide a laboratory 
experience where many of the landmark 
experiments carried out in the developing 
stages of modern physics can be repeated. 
The student may also conduct several 
computer simulated experiments. 

Phys. 303 Statistical Thermodynamics 

4 hours 

Study of macroscopic systems of many 
atoms or molecules which provides an 
introduction to the subjects of statistical 
mechanics, kinetic theory, thermodynamics, 
and heat. Material emphasizes concepts 
useful to those majoring in physics, 
chemistry, and pre-engineering. 
Prerequisite: Physics 201-202. 

Phys. 305 Geometric Optics 2 hours 
The study of light from a non-wave theory 
standpoint. This course includes the study of 
reflection, and optical instruments. 
Prerequisite: Phys. 201-202 or permission of 
the head of the department. 

Phys. 306 Physical Optics 2 hours 
A continuation of Phys. 305, including wave 
theory of light. Topics covered in this course 
include interference, dispersion diffraction, 
polarization, and electro-magnetic nature of 
light. Prerequisite: Phys. 305. 

Phys. 314 Introduction to Classical 
Quantum Mechanics 2 hours 
Continuation of the study of classical 
quantum mechanics begun in Phys. 300. 
Topics include the three-dimensional 
Schroedinger equation, selection rules, 
addition of angular momentum, fine 
structure in hydrogen, exchange symmetry, 
the Zeeman effect, and stimulated emission. 
Prerequisite: Physics 300 or permission of 
the head of the department head. 



109 



Phys. 316 Selected Topics in Solid State 
and Nuclear Physics 2 hours 
Continuation of the study of modern physics. 
Topics include molecular bonding and 
spectra, free-electron theory of metals, band 
theory of solids, superconductivity, nuclear 
shell model, radioactivity, nuclear reactions, 
and elementary particles. Prerequisite: 
Physics 3U or permission of the head of the 
department. 

Phys. 318 Advanced Physics Lab II 

2 hours 

Experiments concerning topics covered in 

Phys. 314 and 316 are emphasized. 

Phys. 322 Spectroscopic Analysis 

2 hours 

Photography and analysis of spectra, 
including: study of flame and arc spectra; 
use of grating and prism spectrographs, 
comparator, densitometer and conversion 
technique; applications of spectral analysis. 
Prerequisite: Permission of the head of the 
department. 

Phys. 477 Seminar in Physics 2 hours 
Survey of physics for review and correlation 
of various fields within the discipline. 
Prerequisite: Permission of the head of the 
department. 

Phys. 480 Methods and Materials in 
Teaching Physical and Life Sciences 

4 hours 

For course description see General Science 

480. (May be taken for credit as Education 

W.) 

Phys. 487-488 Independent Study 

2 or 4 hours each 

Phys. 490 Senior Project 2-6 hours 
Research problems in theoretical or 
experimental physics. Experimental physics 
is offered in such areas as: vacuum systems, 
machine tool operation, electron systems, 
spectroscopy, electron microscopy, 
microwave propagation, nuclear radiation 
and computer science. Theoretical physics 
projects are unlimited in scope and are 
arranged through consultation with the 
student's faculty advisor. 




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Psychology 



Aims 

To assist the student in gaining a basic 
knowledge of psychology as the science 
of human behavior; in developing social 
awareness and social adjustment 
through an understanding of the 
fundamental similarities and 
differences among people; to encourage 
both original and critical thinking; and 
to give background preparation for 
professions which deal with individual 
and group behavior. 

Two Plans of Concentration 

Two plans of concentration are offered 
- one leading to the Bachelor of Arts 
degree and the other to the Bachelor of 
Science degree. 

The Bachelor of Arts plan is designed 
for the student who, while not wishing 
to pursue psychology in its professional 
scientific aspects, does wish to explore 
in some depth those areas of psychology 
that are applicable to his or her future 
life as an intellectually rounded and 
responsible citizen. The program is 
particularly relevant to individuals who 
are interested in working in the mental 
health professions or counseling either 
as paraprofessionals or in fields such as 
school psychology, rehabilitation, or 
guidance counseling. This program is 
not intended for those planning to enter 
regular graduate programs in 
psychology. 



The Bachelor of Science plan is for 
those students who are interested in the 
scientific aspects of psychology - 
particularly for those who are 
considering graduate work in 
psychology. The department, in good 
conscience, will not be able to 
recommend to Ph.D. programs in 
psychology any student who has not 
completed the requirements of this 
plan. 

Semester at Merrill-Palmer 
Institute 

Cooperative arrangements with the 
Merrill-Palmer Institute in Detroit give 
psychology students the opportunity to 
spend a semester at the Merrill-Palmer 
Institute which has exemplary facilities 
for study and first-hand experience in 
various aspects of urban social work 
and counseling. Students contemplating 
a semester at Merrill-Palmer should 
discuss this with their advisors and with 
the Registrar well ahead of time. No 
more than one semester of credit (16 
semester hours) from Merrill-Palmer 
may be counted toward the Bethany 
degree, and the student must plan to be 
in residence at Bethany during the last 
semester of his or her senior year. 

Requirements for the 
Bachelor of Arts Degree 

The Bachelor of Arts degree requires a 
minimum of 24 hours in the department 
(including Psychology 100, 103, 399, and 
477) plus a Senior Project. Depending 
upon the direction of the student's 
interests, the department sees as 
particularly useful and relevant courses 
in sociology, philosophy, child and 
adolescent development, biology, and 
the history of scientific thought. 

Requirements for the 
Bachelor of Science Degree 

The Bachelor of Science degree 
requires a minimum of 30 hours in the 
department, including Psychology 100, 
103, 303, 311, 312, 399, and 477, as well 
as a Senior Project. Six hours are also 
required in natural science. Two of 
these must either be in physiological 



psychology (Psychology 335) or in 
biology courses stressing animal 
biology, physiology, or genetics. The 
remaining four hours may be in similar 
biology courses, physics, or chemistry 
(including General Science 100). 

Students planning on graduate school 
are also advised to take at least one 
course in calculus and to obtain some 
skills in programming and use of the 
computer. It should also be kept in mind 
that most graduate schools require 
Ph.D. candidates to show a reading 
knowledge of one or two foreign 
languages, usually French, German, or 
Spanish. 

Psych. 100 or its equivalent is 
prerequisite to all other courses in the 
department unless specifically exempted 
in a course description. 

Psych. 100 General Psychology 4 hours 
Introduction to the general field of 
psychology, including learning, motivation, 
sensation, perception, cognition, personality, 
abnormal behavior, testing, physiological 
psychology, and social psychology. During 
the academic year, the course is offered in 
two formats. In the Fall semester, there are 
three hours of lecture and two hours of lab 
each week, plus three hour exams and a final 
examination. In the Spring semester, there 
is but one formal lecture hour per week and 
a two hour lab as the course follows a 
modified individualized-learning format 
wherein students may progress at their own 
rate, taking quizzes on the various sections 
of the course when ready. Grading is based 
on the number of sections mastered plus the 
number of points accumulated in course- 
related activities. A full-semester course. 



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Psych. 103 Quantitative Methods in 
Psychology 4 hours 
An introduction to the basic problems and 
techniques of measurement in psychology 
and to basic statistical techniques used in 
psychological research. This course also 
includes an introduction to designs for 
research and experimentation. Highly 
recommended for those planning to take 
upper-division courses in psychology and 
required of all psychology majors. Majors 
should plan to enroll concurrently in Psych. 
203. Four lectures and one lab each week 
during the first half of the semester, two 
lectures and one lab each week in the second 
half of the semester. 

Psych. 180-189 Special Topics in 
Psychology 

Seminars in this category take up special 
topics of mutual concern to staff and 
students. 

Psych. 186 Psychology of Consciousness 

2 hours 

Consideration of the nature of human 
consciousness, concentrating upon both 
normal consciousness and altered states of 
consciousness resulting from dreams, 
hypnosis, biofeedback, drugs, and 
meditation. Emphasis is given to recent 
explorations concerning two major modes of 
consciousness: the intellectual and the 
intuitive. Does not fulfill distribution 
requirements in the physical and life 
sciences. Full semester course. Two, one- 
hour meetings each week. 



Psych. 187 Evolution, Ethology, and the 
Nature of Man 2 hours 
This course examines the various models or 
images of man that have been introduced in 
recent years by students of ethology, 
evolutionary biology and sociobiology. 
Attention also is given to a few of the ways 
in which humanist and religious thinkers 
have attempted to integrate these new 
models. Two, one-hour meetings per week. 

Psych. 203 Experimental Research 

2 hours 

An intermediate-level review of content and 
method in experimental psychology, with 
emphasis upon learning, motivation, and 
perception. Psych. 103 must be taken in the 
same semester. Three lectures and one lab 
per week. 

Psych. 275 Student Development in 
Higher Education 2 hours 
(See Education 275.) Does not fulfill 
distribution requirements in the physical and 
life sciences. 

Psych. 287 Organizations and Human 
Behavior 4 hours 
(See Econ. 287.) 

Psych. 311 Experimental Psychology I 

4 hours 

Encourages the student to become 
conversant with the basic factual and 
theoretical content of experimental 
psychology at an intermediate level, and to 
engage in experimental work in the areas of 
sensation, perception, and cognitive 
processes. Full-semester course. 
Prerequisite: Psych. 103, 203. Three lectures 
and one lab each week. 

Psych. 312 Experimental Psychology II 

4 hours 

Continuation of Psych. 311, covering the 
areas of learning, perceptual-motor skills, 
and motivation. Full-semester course. 
Prerequisite: Psych. 103, 203. Three lectures 
and one lab each week. 

Psych. 315 Modification of Behavior 

2 hours 

Course has two main aims: to help the 
student learn systematically to analyze 
behavior in terms of the S-R-Reinforcement 
principles as developed by Skinner, Wolpe 
and others to help the student develop skills 
in the application of these principles to the 
modification of behavior in practical 
situations. Examples of the latter arise in 
the areas of behavior disorder, child-rearing, 
the work situation, and habit change. 



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Psych. 324 Personality and Adjustment 

4 hours 

Covers major theories of personality and 
principles of personal adjustment and 
growth, including development, motivation, 
dynamics, problems in group living, and 
intellectual, emotional, and social 
adjustment. The course should be valuable to 
the potential doctor, nurse, social worker, 
child-care worker, teacher, or parent. Full 
semester course. Three lectures and one lab 
each week. 

Psych. 325 Behavior Disorder and 
Treatment 4 hours 
The development, dynamics, social 
significance, and theoretical implications of 
deviant behavior. While the traditional 
psychiatric diagnostic categories are studied, 
there is a strong emphasis upon alternative 
approaches in the medical model of 
abnormality. The concepts of normality and 
abnormality in relation to cultural norms 
and stereotypes are examined in depth. The 
course should prove particularly useful to 
students planning on a career in the helping 
professions. Full semester course. Four 
lectures each week. 



112 




Psych. 326 Experimental Social 
Psychology 4 hours 

Aspects of social behavior and specific social 
issues are examined within the context of 
theory and experimental research. Topics 
include social factors in the development of 
morals; cooperation and competition; 
aggression; racial and social-class 
differences in personality, motivation, and 
language; attitudes and attitude change; 
authoritarianism and obedience; 
interpersonal and group processes 
(affiliation, attraction, perception, 
conformity, and leadership); and discussion 
of drug and sex issues. Full-semester course. 
Four lectures each week. Prerequisite: Psych. 
100 if course is to be counted as psychology. 
Soc. 100 and Psych. 100 if course is to be 
counted as sociology. 



Psych. 327 Seminar in Theories and 
Techniques of Psychotherapy and 
Counseling 4 hours 

Provides the student with a basic knowledge 
of the varied theories and techniques used in 
professional psychotherapy and counseling. 
Both academic and experiential learning are 
included, which should be particularly useful 
to students interested in going on into one of 
the helping professions such as clinical 
psychology, psychiatry, social work, school 
psychology, counseling, or occupational 
therapy. Prerequisites: Psych. 100 and 324 or 
325 plus permission of the instructor. 

Psych. 328 Human Sexuality 4 hours 
Examination of the various psychological, 
biological, social, comparative, legal, and 
ethical aspects of human sexuality. In 
addition to sexual anatomy, physiology, birth 
control, and venereal disease, the course 
takes up current issues such as sex-role 
development, sex reassignment, and sex 
therapy. Does not fulfill distribution 
requirements in physical and life sciences. 
(May be taken for credit as Education 328.) 

Psych. 333 Educational Psychology 

2 hours 

Study of the application of psychological 
principles to the field of education. Included 
are the areas of learning, transfer of 
training, individual differences, motivation, 
and behavior modification as they apply to 
education. Half-semester course. (May be 
taken for credit as Education 333.) 
Prerequisite: Four hours of general 
psychology. 

Psych. 335 Biological Bases of 
Behavior 2 hours 
Examines the neural and biochemical 
substrates of the more important aspects of 
animal and human behavior. Half-semester 
course. Three hours of lecture and one lab 
each week. 

Psych. 399 Junior Preparation 4 hours 
This course is designed to help students 
round out their background in the content 
and methods of psychology in preparation 
for their senior year. An intensive review of 
the various fields of psychology is 
undertaken and students engage in tutoring 
and proctoring in the General Psychology 
course. Methods of field research and 
program-evaluation strategies are studied. A 
full-semester course meeting three hours per 
week. 



Psych. 415 Systematic Psychology 

4 hours 

Examination of the systematic positions and 
theories that have been important in the 
history of psychology, as well as a brief 
review of the philosophical bases underlying 
these positions. Full-semester course. Four 
lectures each week. 

Psych. 477 Senior Seminar 2 hours 
An introduction to professional 
opportunities in psychology and related 
fields and an exploration of value and ethical 
consideration. Continued guidance on senior 
project and senior comprehensive 
examinations also will be provided during 
the course. 

Psych. 480 Methods and Materials in 
Teaching Psychology 4 hours 
Study of the methods and materials used in 
teaching psychology in the secondary school. 
The course has a systematic and 
experimental emphasis. (May be taken for 
credit as Education 480.) Prerequisite: 16 
hours of psychology. 

Psych. 487-488 Independent Study 

2 or 4 hours each 

Psych. 490 Senior Project 2-8 hours 



113 



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Religious 
Studies 



Aims 

The department desires to continue the 
historic interest of the College in the 
intellectual, spiritual, and social 
development of the community. 
Students are encouraged to join in the 
exploration of thought and research in 
the field of religious studies. Biblical 
studies form the central core of 
departmental offerings. In addition, 
each student also examines the 
relationship between religion and 
culture (both ancient and modern). The 
personal integration of knowledge and 
faith for an understanding and 
appreciation of value systems is a 
conscious goal of the department. 

The department's aims are future- 
oriented. Rather than teaching a 
particular point of view, the department 
seeks to assist the student in learning 
how to acquire, evaluate, and use 
religious knowledge. Each course is 
consciously designed to enhance the 
student's efforts to interrelate his or 
her varied academic, social, and 
personal experiences. 

Requirements for Field 
of Concentration 

A minimum of 24 hours (excluding 
Religious Studies 100) in the 
department, a Senior Project, and the 
successful completion of the Senior 
Comprehensive Examination constitute 
the stated requirements of the 
department. 

The Comprehensive Examination in 
Religious Studies emphasizes Biblical 
studies, early Christianity, and 
contemporary religious thought and 
culture. 



Students electing the field of religious 
studies are strongly urged to develop a 
proficiency in one or more foreign 
languages, to formulate a related field 
of concentration and to consider 
spending at least one semester in study 
abroad. 

R.S. 100 Judaeo-Christian Heritage and 
Contemporary Living 4 hours 
Study of the Judaeo-Christian heritage with 
the aim of understanding how Biblical 
writers reflect on the basic human and social 
issues which continue to engage 
contemporary man. Study is done within a 
triple context: (l)the Biblical tradition; 
(2) the liberal arts tradition of Bethany 
College; and (3) contemporary questions. 

R.S. 285 Meditative Poetry 4 hours 
(See English 285.) 

R.S. 286 Cosmic Warfare 4 hours 
(See English 286.) 

R.S. 300 Old Testament Literature and 
Thought 4 hours 

Study of the development of Israelite 
religion and its institutions, the history of 
the various types of Old Testament 
literature, and the thought and theological 
motifs of Old Testament writers. Students 
will be assisted in acquiring a developmental 
understanding of Old Testament religion and 
an appreciation of its continuing value. 
Prerequisites: R.S. 100 and permission of the 
instructor. 

R.S. 302 Wisdom Literature 2 hours 
Critical and appreciative reading of the 
literature of the Old Testament wisdom 
school (Proverbs, Job, and Ecclesiastes). 
Students are assisted to understand the 
ways in which the wisdom school sought to 
understand man, his meaning and destiny, 
his social relationships, and the meaning of 
history. 

R.S. 304 Mission and Message of the 
Prophets 2 hours 

Critical and appreciative reading of selected 
writings of the classical prophets of ancient 
Israel (Amos, Hosea, Isaiah, Jeremiah, and 
Ezekiel). Students are assisted to 
understand the major ideas of the prophets 
and the relationship of these ideas to the 
issues facing both ancient and modern man. 

R.S. 311 Studies in the Gospels 

4 hours 

Students are assisted in developing the 
means to discern the message of the 
different gospel writers. While 



concentrating on the Gospel of Mark, the 
course equips the student to do basic study 
in any of the Gospels. Prerequisites: R.S. 100 
and permission of the instructor. 

R.S. 312 The Pauline School 4 hours 
Students are assisted in developing an 
understanding of the Apostle Paul as a man, 
his thought, his place in early Christianity, 
the thoughts of his disciples and his 
opponents. Prerequisites: R.S. 100 and 
permission of the instructor. 

R.S. 313 The Revelation of St. John 

2 hours 

Students are assisted in developing a facility 
to understand the message of the Revelation 
of St. John and other apocalyptic materials, 
to explore the history of apocalyptic imagery 
and literary relationships, and to discover 
the backgrounds and causes of the rise of 
the apocalyptic movement. 

R.S. 314 The Gospel of John 2 hours 
The student will study the Fourth Gospel as 
an important document in the history of 
religions, as a special literary form and 
composite, as a witness to the historical 
Jesus, and as a continuing witness to faith 
and to the meaning of human existence. 

R.S. 322 Sociology of Religion 2 hours 
(See Sociology 356.) 

R.S. 336 20th Century Protestant 
Thought 4 hours 

Students read and discuss the work of 
leading 20th century Protestant thinkers 
such as Paul Tillich, Karl Barth, Dietrich 
Bonhoeffer, and the Niebuhrs. 

R.S. 341 Hinduism and Buddhism 

4 hours 

Students explore the chief features of 
Hinduism and Buddhism. The course begins 
with an examination of the history, ritual, 
and ethics of Hinduism. Special readings 
focus on the Upanishads and Bhagavad- 



Gita. The student will then survey the life 
and teachings of the Buddha and Buddhism's 
development into its Theravada and 
Mahayana forms (including Zen). 

R.S. 342 The Religions of China 

2 hours 

Students explore the chief features of 
Confucianism and Taoism. The course begins 
with a consideration of the most ancient 
features of Chinese religion and will focus 
then on a careful reading (in translation) of 
Confucius' Analects and Lato Tzu's Tao-te- 
ching. 

R.S. 351 Ancient Near Eastern 
Civilization 4 hours 
This course introduces the students to the 
historical development of life, culture, and 
religions of Mesopotamia, Egypt, and the 
Syro-Phonecian coast, including 
international relations from pre-history to 
Alexander the Great. (May be taken for 
credit as History 351.) 

R.S. 352 Islamic Religion and Culture 

4 hours 

Study of the life and background of the 

prophet, the Quran, the development of 

Islamic thought, and the early Islamic 

empires. 

R.S. 353 Hellenistic Civilization 4 hours 
Development of an acquaintance with the 
Graeco-Roman Oriental world based on a 
survey of social and cultural developments 
from Alexander the Great to Julius Caesar. 
(May be taken for credit as History 353.) 

R.S. 361 American Catholicism 

2 hours 

A descriptive study of contemporary 
American Catholicism and its roots. The 
course emphasizes such topics as: modern 
Catholic worship, the crisis of authority, the 
"immigrant church," the church and political 
life, Catholic education, and the charismatic 
movement. 

R.S. 362 American Judaism 2 hours 
A descriptive study of contemporary 
American Judaism and its roots. The course 
emphasizes the life-cycle customs of 
Judaism. Jewish holidays are studied in the 
context of Jewish history. The course seeks 
to develop a broader understanding of the 
modern Jewish community in the United 
States and is supported by a grant from the 
Jewish Chautauqua Society. 



115 



R.S. 370 Renaissance and Reformation 

History 4 hours 

The course will trace briefly the 

development of the Renaissance and will 

concentrate on the chief reformers of the 

sixteenth century - Zwingli, Luther, and 

Calvin. 

R.S. 373 History of Early Christianity 

4 hours 

Introduction to the origins and expansion of 
Christianity from the period of Augustus 
Caesar to Constantine. The problems of 
institutions, consolidation, varieties, 
divisions, and unification will be explored in 
historical context. 

R.S. 374 History of Eastern Christianity 

4 hours 

A study of the development of the Eastern 
Roman Empire and Byzantine Christianity 
from Constantine to the fall of 
Constantinople. Special attention will be 
given to the Eastern Fathers in both the 
Greek and Semitic developments of the 
church. 

R.S. 376 History of Medieval Christianity 

4 hours 

Examination of the major developments 
within European Latin Christianity between 
the sixth and fourteenth centuries. Topics 
covered include: the conversion of Europe; 
relationships between church and state; 
contacts and conflicts with Byzantine 
Christianity and Islam; monasticism; the 
development of theology and Christian 
culture; reform, dissent, heresy and schism. 

R.S. 381 Church Leadership Practice 

2 hours 

Development of an understanding of the 
theory and practice of public worship, 
preaching, and church program planning. 

R.S. 382 Cultural Life in the Middle 
East and North Africa 4 hours 
(See History 382.) 

R.S. 383 Introduction to Bioethics 

4 hours 

Consideration of the religious and ethical 
dimensions involved in human decisions 
concerning abortion, artificial birth control, 
genetic planning, euthanasia, organ 
transplants, medical experiments on human 
subjects, and various forms of behavior 
modification. 

R.S. 487-488 Independent Study 

2 or 4 hours each 

R.S. 490 Senior Project 2 to 8 hours 



116 




Social 
Sciences 



Social Sciences is a grouping of courses 
only. It is not a separate department. 
Students who participate in such 
programs as the American University 
Washington Semester and other similar 
off-campus programs may receive 
credit in this area. 

Students majoring in History, Political 
Science, Economics or Sociology who 
wish to be recommended for state 
certification in Social Studies must 
complete the following courses: History 
100, 201, 202, 225; Soc. 100 or 320; Eco. 
200; G.S. 202 or Soc. Sci. 302; Pol. Sci. 
225, as well as 24 hours in their major 
field. See the Education Department 
listings for required Professional 
Education courses. 

Soc. Sci. 302 World Geography 2 hours 
Study of the physical, social, and political 
geographic factors of the world. Recent 
changes in Europe, Asia, and Africa are 
discussed. 




Soc. Sci. 320 Cultural Backgrounds of 
British Literature 4 hours 
Survey of British history from the Celtic 
times to the present. Major political 
developments such as the development of 
parliamentary government and the 
constitution are taken into account, but 
major emphasis is placed on extra-political 
matters such as the development of the 
English language, music, art, architecture, 
drama, the English church, education, and 
domestic life. Every effort is made to take 
advantage of the locale to visit museums, 
castles, cathedrals, universities, Parliament, 
theatres, and concert halls. Taught in 
Oxford, England. 

Soc. Sci. 365 Society and Schools 

2 hours 

A study of the role of schools in a society, of 
the school as a formal and informal 
organization, and of the function of 



schooling. The course will utilize the 
methodologies of the disciplines of 
education, sociology, and other social 
sciences. Case studies and on-site 
observations combine with a variety of 
readings to provide a wide range of 
viewpoints for students to evaluate. 

Soc. Sci. 480 Methods and Materials in 
Teaching Social Studies 2 hours 
Nature, objectives, and curricula of social 
studies in junior and senior high schools. 
Concepts and methods of approach are 
emphasized. Methods, techniques, teaching 
aids, resource units, lesson plans, evaluation, 
and teaching reading and study skills. (May 
be taken for credit as Education 480.) 



117 




Sociology 
and 
Social Work 



Aims 

To acquaint students with basic 
theories, research techniques, and 
applied practices in sociology, social 
work, and anthropology, and to prepare 
students for graduate study in these 
disciplines, or to enter professions in 
community service and other fields 
which require a knowledge of social 
relations. 

Requirements for Field of 
Concentration in Sociology 

A minimum of 36 hours in Sociology, 
including Sociology 100, 200, 208, 209, 
and 477, plus a Senior Project. 
Sociology 100 or 110 is a prerequisite to 
Sociology 200, 309, 320, 329, 330, 353, 
361, 362, 470, and 477. 

Soc. 100 Introduction to Sociology 

4 hours 

Introduction to basic concepts and 

perspectives of the study of society. Includes 

analysis of principal institutions and social 

processes. 

Soc. 200 Sociological Theory 4 hours 
Examination of social thought with primary 
emphasis upon the principal theorists from 
the 19th century to the present. 

Soc. 205 Social Problems 4 hours 
Though emphasis and illustrations will vary 
as the scene changes, the course is built on 
the analysis of fundamental and continuing 
problems and dilemmas, such as crime and 
delinquency, racial and ethnic relationships, 
health care and maintenance, employment, 
housing, poverty, and environmental issues. 



Soc. 208 Research Methods and 
Statistics I 4 hours 
Some of the more common methods and 
statistics used in social research. Includes 
introductory practical experience with 
statistical program packages in computing. 

Soc. 209 Research Methods and 
Statistics II 4 hours 
The student is guided through the formal 
process of designing an empirical project. 
Emphasis is placed upon systematically 
reviewing relevant literature and justifying 
decisions concerning techniques to be used. 
Includes hypothesis formation and testing, 
methods of data collection and analysis, and 
problems of sampling. 

Soc. 210 Race and Minority Concerns 

2 hours 

A survey of racial, cultural, ethnic, age and 

sexual diversity with emphasis on the effects 

of prejudice and discrimination on 

minorities. 

Soc. 309 Formal Organization 

4 hours 

Analysis of commercial, industrial and public 
organizations and bureaucracies. Morale, 
subgroup conflict and cooperation, and the 
impact of social environment or 
organizational structure. 



Soc. 329 Population Study 2 hours 
An introduction to demography. Theories 
and methods of studies concerning 
population size and composition. Trends of 
population change in the world and in the 
United States. 

Soc. 351 The Family 4 hours 
Examination of the structure and function of 
the family as a basic unit of social 
organization. Changing nature of marriage 
and the family in American society. 

Soc. 353 Social Stratification 2 hours 
Study of forms of social stratification and 
differentiation. Class, prestige and power as 
the bases of stratification. Theories of the 
cause of social stratification and social 
mobility. 

Soc. 356 Sociology of Religion 

4 hours 

Formal religion and its functional 
equivalents both in primitive and modern 
societies. The relationship between religion 
and other social institutions. Religion and 
social change. 

Soc. 361 Deviance and Social Control 

4 hours 

Sociological perspectives focusing on 
problems of deviance such as crime, mental 
illness, and sexual deviation. Institutions of 
correction and rehabilitation are examined. 

Soc. 362 Socialization 2 hours 
Study of socialization as a process whereby 
the individual becomes a functioning 
member of a group. Processes of 
resocialization. 

Soc. 470 Field Work 2-8 hours 
Available to students who are sufficiently 
advanced in their theoretical and 
methodological studies to undertake 
investigation of a practical or theoretical 
problem in a field setting. Prerequisite: 
Permission of Department. 

Soc. 477 Senior Seminar 4 hours 
Consideration of conceptual and research 
problems in a seminar setting. Includes 
preparation for comprehensive examinations 
and senior projects. 



Soc. 487-488 Independent Study 

2 or 4 hours each 

Studies may be planned as extensions of, or 

separate from, existing Department 

offerings. 

Soc. 490 Senior Project 2-8 hours 
For students approaching completion of 
their majors. Designed to help students 
evaluate their activities in sociology and to 
integrate their educational experiences. 



Anthropology 



Soc. 110 Introduction to Anthropology 

4 hours 

An introduction to the physical, cultural, and 
technological evolution of man. Investigation 
of human nature through examination of 
cultural institutions related to kinship, age, 
sex, economics and religion. 

Soc. 320 Cultural Anthropology 4 hours 
Examination of cultural variability in terms 
of its implications for understanding human 
nature. Analysis of particular cultural 
systems and comparative analysis is 
included. 

Soc. 330 Applied Anthropology 4 hours 
Planned and directed social and cultural 
change. An examination of the history, 
theory and methods of applied anthropology 
with emphasis upon the dynamics of 
technological change. 



119 



Requirements for a Degree 
in Social Work 

The goal of the social work program is 
to prepare the student for beginning 
social work practice. Students will 
accomplish this goal by completing 38 
hours of social work courses to include: 
S.W. 120, S.W. 220, S.W. 230, S.W. 240, 
S.W. 310, S.W. 350, S.W. 352, S.W. 470, 
and S.W. 477. In addition students must 
complete Soc. 205, Soc. 208 or 209, Soc. 
210, Psych. 100, Psych. 326, Pol. Sci. 
226, Pol. Sci. 300 and completion of a 
senior project in Social Work. Social 
Work 120 or permission of the 
department head is a prerequisite to all 
courses in Social Work. 

Within the Social Work curriculum 
students will be able to pursue a variety 
of concentrations to include child 
welfare, aging, public welfare, health 
care, corrections, mental health, school 
social work, and church community 
relations. 

Students electing the field of study in 
social work are encouraged to develop a 
proficiency in the Spanish language and 
to select distribution courses to include: 
Economics 200, Education 201 and 202, 
Sociology 100, Psychology 315, 324, 325 
and 328. 



S.W 120 Introduction to Social Welfare 
and Social Work 2 hours 
An examination of the origin and 
development of social welfare as an 
institution in the United States. 
Examination of the role of the social worker, 
and the place of the profession in society. 

S.W. 125-150 Special Topics in Social 

Work 2 or 4 hours each 

Seminars in this category take up special 

topics of mutual concern to faculty and 

students. 

S.W 220 Social Work Policy and 
Services 4 hours 

Examines the social, political and economic 
context of social welfare policies and 
programs. Analysis of specific policy issues 
and their implications for professional social 
work practice. 

S.W 230 Social Welfare Institutions 

2 hours 

Critical examination of organized societal 
response to social welfare need. Conducts a 
conceptual analysis of the scope and intent 
of social welfare programs, clarifying the 
concept of social welfare and showing how 
welfare intent is carried into constructive 
social action. 

S.W 240 Introduction to Social Work 
Practice 2 hours 

An introduction to basic dynamics necessary 
to engage clients in the social work process. 
Beginning listening, interviewing, and 
recording skills will be emphasized. 

S.W. 310 Human Behavior and the Social 
Environment 4 hours 
Focuses on the person as an individual with 
the continuing potential for growth and 
change. The maturational process of the 
individual will be followed with emphasis 
being given to interaction with the social 
environment, coping abilities and capacity 
for change. The bio-psycho-socio-cultural 
determinants of behavior are studied 
integrating knowledge of the person-in- 
his/her situation. 

S.W 350 Social Work Practice and 
Methods I 4 hours 

Basic theories and concepts undergirding 
skills for professional social work practice. 
Study focuses on professional values, social 
work roles, and social work client 
relationships. Skills in interviewing, data 
collection and case recording are explored 
and practiced. 



S.W. 352 Social Work Practice and 
Methods II 4 hours 

In-depth and advanced examination of the 
social work process. Problem solving and 
intervention strategies are studied in 
relation to prevention, maintenance, and 
rehabilitation. The skill of social work 
practice is explored in the context of current 
programs and practice methods. 

S.W. 470 Field Placement 12 hours 
An educationally directed internship 
experience in a social welfare agency or 
program as a social work practitioner. The 
field experience will involve five full days a 
week agency experience during the fall 
semester of the senior year of study. The 
placement is designed to test and increase 
student practice skills with the goal of self 
direction and the appropriate use of 
supervision and consultation within the 
social work practice setting. 

S.W. 477 Field Practice Seminar 

4 hours 

Provides advanced professional knowledge 
which examines problems and issues of 
social work practice. The transitional role of 
the student moving from an undergraduate 
academic setting to the world of work and /or 
graduate study will be explored. Need for 
specific content not previously available to 
the student is arranged. 

S.W. 487-488 Independent Study 

2 or 4 hours each 

Studies may be planned as extensions of, or 

separate from existing Social Work 

offerings. 

S.W 490 Senior Project 2-8 hours 
Study will be directed in a specialized 
concentration of social work practice. 
Designed to allow the student to integrate 
both the field placement and academic 
experience. 



120 




Theatre 



Aims 

To provide students with a working 
knowledge of the major theatre 
techniques: acting, directing, 
production design, and oral 
interpretation; to acquaint students 
with the development of dramatic 
literature and the history of theatre; 
and to prepare students for graduate 
work in theatre, for work in 
professional or community theatre, or 
for the teaching of the dramatic arts. 

Requirements for Field of 
Concentration 

Each student is required to complete a 
minimum of 32 hours in the Theatre 
Department, exclusive of the Senior 
Project. The following courses are 
required: Theatre 145, 151, 152, 154, 
217, 220, 222, 255-256, 270, 273, 274, 
330, and 477. It is recommended that 
students also take courses from among 
the following: English Department 
courses concentrating on dramatic 
literature; speech, oral interpretation, 
and radio-television courses; art and 
music courses; Philosophy 358; and 
other courses in the Theatre 
Department. 



121 



For those desiring to be certified to 
teach theatre in secondary schools, a 
major in English with a specialty in 
theatre is mandatory. English 480 is 
required for certification. (See also the 
English Department for the possibility 
of theatre specialization under 
Requirements 1 and 2 for field of 
concentration.) 

Each Theatre major must take the 
comprehensive examination. The 
examination consists of an essay 
examination and an oral examination. 

Th. 145 Introduction to Dramatic 
Literature 4 hours 
Study of the development of drama as a 
form of literature, with emphasis upon how 
to read plays and how to attend 
performances of these scripts when put to 
practice. (May be taken for credit as English 
145.) 



Th. 151 

2 hours 



Fundamentals of Set Construction 



Th. 152 Fundamentals of Theatre 
Lighting 2 hours 

Th. 153 Fundamentals of Costume 
Design and Construction 2 hours 

Th. 154 Fundamentals of Stage Make-Up 

2 hours 



Th. 155 Puppetry 2 hours 
Fundamentals of puppet construction and 
puppet stage design. Emphasis is placed 
upon the creation of a puppet program to be 
presented for public performance in 
elementary schools. 

Th. 206 Interpersonal Communication: 

Speech 4 hours 

(See Communications 206.) 

Th. 210 Dance for Non-Dancers 

2 hours 

The development of beginning dancing skills 
with emphasis upon improvisational dance 
modes and creative body language. 

Th. 217 Imaginative Writing 2 hours 
(See English 217.) 

Th. 220 Beginning Acting 2 hours 
Movement, various styles, improvisations, 
projections of character, and speech 
technique. The course includes a 10-20 
minute planned and rehearsed program that 
demonstrates skills acquired in 
improvisation and body and voice 
techniques. 

Th. 222 Advanced Acting 2 hours 
Scene study as a unit of theatrical form. 
Scenes from various periods to be directed 
and performed. Focus on interaction 
between characters. Prerequisite: Th. 220. 

Th. 230 Children's Theatre 2 hours 
The development of techniques required for 
performing before children. Focus is upon 
the preparation of a complete children's 
theatre project to be presented before 
groups of young people. Prerequisite: 
Th. 220. 

Th. 255-256 Great Plays 2 hours each 
(See English 255-256.) 

Th. 270 Shakespeare 4 hours 
(See English 270.) 

Th. 273 British Drama to 1901 

2 hours 

(See English 273.) 

Th. 274 British and American Drama in 
the Twentieth Century 2 hours 
(See English 274.) 

Th. 307 Interpersonal Communication: 
Oral Interpretation 2 hours 
(See Comm. 307.) 



Th. 330 Beginning Direction 2 hours 
Fundamentals of staging: blocking, 
movement, stage business, tempo, script 
analyses, casting, and rehearsal planning. 
The course includes preparation of a prompt 
book for a one-act play to be directed for 
public performance. Prerequisite: Th. 220. 

Th. 477 Senior Seminar 2 hours 
Reading, criticism, and research designed to 
review and correlate a student's work in the 
Theatre Department. Prerequisite: All 
required courses in the department and at 
least one advanced seminar. 

Th. 480 Methods of Teaching English 
and Theatre 2 hours 
Study of methods and materials used in 
teaching English and theatre. The teaching 
of high school composition and literature. 
Literary analysis, systems of grammar, and 
reading improvement. (May be taken for 
credit as Education 480.) 

Th. 487-488 Independent Study 

2 or 4 hours each 

Individual study in any area of theatre or 
English in which the student is qualified to 
work independently. Independent study is 
offered only in areas not included in other 
courses in the English and Theatre 
Departments. Prerequisites: Demonstrated 
proficiency in expository writing, adequate 
preparation to undertake the study as 
determined by the instructor, and 
permission of the head of the department. 

Th. 490 Senior Project 2 or 4 hours 
During the junior year each theatre major 
must present for the approval of the 
department a prospectus for a major project 
in acting, directing, production design, or 
the history of theatre. During the senior 
year the theatre major must successfully 
complete this project and defend it in oral 
and/or written form. Acceptable projects 
include a solo performance at least one hour 
in length; the direction of a full-length play; 
the design and/or the execution of the 
lighting, settings, or costumes for a full- 
length play; or a study of a specific aspect of 
theatre history. Open only to senior theatre 
majors. 



122 



The 
Directories 

BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

Officers of the Board 

CHARLES D. BELL, Chairman 
TODD H. BULLARD, President 
WM. DANIEL COBB, III, Vice President 
ROBERT A. SANDERCOX, Vice President 
JOHN A. GRAHAM, Treasurer 
SIDNEY S. GOOD, JR., Secretary 
JOHN A. GRAHAM, Assistant Secretary 

TERM EXPIRES JUNE 1981 

MARSHALL L. BERKMAN, AMPCO - 
Pittsburgh Corporation, 700 Porter 
Building, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

JAMES L. COLLINS, Picoma Industries, 
Inc., Martins Ferry, Ohio 

JOHN E. COSTELLO, 418 Washington 
Avenue, Charleroi, Pennsylvania 

SIDNEY S. GOOD, JR., L.S. Good and 
Company, 1134 Market Street, Wheeling, 
West Virginia 

MICHAEL J. KASARDA, RD 4, Bellaire, 
Ohio 

EUGENE MILLER, 376 Sunrise Circle, 
Glencoe, Illinois 

G. OGDEN NUTTING, The Ogden 
Newspapers, Inc., 1500 Main Street, 
Wheeling, West Virginia 

MALCOLM W. RUSH, 3096 Orchard Road, 
Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio 

HAROLD R. WATKINS, Board of Church 
Extension of the Christian Church (Disciples 
of Christ), 110 South Downey Avenue, 
Indianapolis, Indiana 

FRANK L. WIEGAND, JR., 855 Academy 
Place, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

TERM EXPIRES JUNE 1982 

ALTON W. BEHM, M.D., 112 South Street, 
Chardon, Ohio 



COURTNEY BURTON, OglebayNorton 
Company, 1200 Hanna Building, Cleveland, 
Ohio 

IVABELL HARLAN, 1143 Timberview 
Trail, Bloomfield Hills, Michigan 

WILLIAM R. HOAG, West Elizabeth 
Lumber Company, Fifth Street, West 
Elizabeth, Pennsylvania 

RODNEY B. HURL, M.D., 211 Stocksdale 
Drive, Marysville, Ohio 

THOMAS PHILLIPS JOHNSON, 1500 
Oliver Building, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

WILLIAM L. MILLER, JR., National City 
Christian Church Corporation, Thomas 
Circle, Washington, D.C. 

WILLIAM F. PORTER, Globe Refractories, 
Inc., P.O. Box D, Newell, West Virginia 

JOHN G. REDLINE, JR., Weirton Steel 
Division, National Steel Corporation, 
Weirton, West Virginia 

TERM EXPIRES JUNE 1983 

CHARLES D. BELL, 67 Seventh Street, 
Wellsburg, West Virginia 

ROBERT F. CORY, 420 Blackhawk Road, 
Beaver Falls, Pennsylvania 

ROBERT MACKENZIE, JR., 100 Chapel 
Ridge Place, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

ANN C. PRESTON, 3344 Montavesta 
Drive, Lexington, Kentucky 

JOHN W. RENNER, 601 Rockwell Avenue, 
Cleveland, Ohio 

WILLIAM S. RYAN, Edmondson Avenue at 
Academy Road, Baltimore, Maryland 

ANN W. TROMBADORE, 626 Watchung 
Road, Bound Brook, New Jersey 

ROBERT C. WETENHALL. McConnell, 
Wetenhall & Company, Inc., 375 Park 
Avenue, New York, New York 

Faculty Representative to the Board 

ROBERT E. MYERS, Bethany, West 
Virginia 

Honorary Trustees 

MERRITT J. DAVIS, 200 Sycamore Street, 
Wellsburg, West Virginia 

A. DALE FIERS, 236 Inlet Way, Palm 
Beach Shores, Florida 

PERRY E. GRESHAM, Highland Hearth, 
Bethany, West Virginia 

ROBERT D. HURL, 56 Harriett Drive, 
Shelby, Ohio 

PAUL A. NORTON, 20 Church Street, 
A-30, Greenwich, Connecticut 

CHARLES E. PALMER, Bigelow 
Apartments Hotel, Bigelow Square, 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

MAYNARD L. PATTON, Carmel Manor 
Nursing Home, Carmel Avenue, Fort 
Thomas, Kentucky 

D. ERVIN SHEETS, 1125 Singing Wood 
Court, Walnut Creek, California 

JOSEPHINE WICKERHAM HOBBINS, 
7150 Estero Boulevard, Fort Myers, Florida 

Committees of the Board of Trustees 

EXECUTIVE (Elected) 
Michael J. Kasarda, Chairman; Charles D. 
Bell; John E. Costello; Sidney S. Good, Jr.; 
William R. Hoag; Rodney B. Hurl; Thomas 
P. Johnson; G. Ogden Nutting; William F. 
Porter; Harold R. Watkins; Frank L. 
Wiegand, Jr. 



FINANCE, BUDGET AND AUDIT 

(Elected by Executive Committee) 

G. Ogden Nutting, Chairman; Sidney S. 

Good, Jr.; Michael J. Kasarda; William F. 

Porter; (Charles D. Bell, John A. Graham, ex 

officio) 

INVESTMENT (Elected) 
Frank L. Wiegand, Jr., Chairman; Thomas 
P. Johnson; William R. Hoag; Perry E. 
Gresham; (Charles D. Bell, John A. Graham, 
ex officio) 

BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 
Malcolm W. Rush, Chairman; Alton W. 
Behm; John E. Costello; James L. Collins 

CHURCH RELATIONS 

William L. Miller, Jr., Chairman; Ann C. 

Preston; William S. Ryan; Harold R. 

Watkins 

DEVELOPMENT 

Rodney B. Hurl, Chairman; Courtney 
Burton; James L. Collins; Robert F. Cory; 
Sidney S. Good, Jr.; William R. Hoag; 
Robert C. Wetenhall; Frank L. Wiegand, Jr. 

LONG RANGE PLANNING 

John E. Costello, Chairman; Sidney S. Good, 

Jr., Rodney B. Hurl; William L. Miller, Jr. 

NOMINATING 

William F. Porter, Chairman; Alton W. 

Behm; Charles D. Bell; Rodney B. Hurl 

STUDENT-FACULTY-ALUMNI 

RELATIONS 

Alton W. Behm; Marshall L. Berkman; 

Ivabell Harlan; Rodney B. Hurl; Robert 

Mackenzie; Ann C. Preston; John W. 

Renner; Malcolm W. Rush; Ann W. 

Trombadore 

BOARD OF FELLOWS 

DRAPER ALLEN, Detroit, Michigan 
MONE ANATHAN, JR., La Quinto, 

California 
JOHN F. BAXTER, Gainesville, Florida 
LOUIS BERKMAN, Steubenville, Ohio 
THOMAS M. BLOCH, Wheeling, West 

Virginia 
J. CALEB BOGGS, Wilmington, Delaware 
GEORGE E. CARTER, Gates Mills, Ohio 
JAMES F. COMSTOCK, Richwood, West 

Virginia 



ALBERT V. DIX, Martins Ferry, Ohio 
ARTHUR EICHELKRAUT, Wheeling, 

West Virginia 
WARD L. EKAS, Rochester, New York 
ROBERT W. FERGUSON, Wheeling, West 

Virginia 
BROOKS HAYS, Washington, D.C. 
ROBERT HAZLETT, SR., Wheeling, West 

Virginia 
ARTHUR S. HOLDEN, Painesville, Ohio 
GORDON HUTCHINSON, Chattanooga, 

Tennessee 
FORREST H. KIRKPATRICK, Wheeling, 

West Virginia 
ARTHUR J. KOBACKER, Columbus, Ohio 
T. W. LIPPERT, Sea Gert, New Jersey 
WILLIAM J. MAIER, JR., Charleston, West 

Virginia 
A. F. MARSHAL, JR., Wheeling, West 

Virginia 
MERIL A. MAY, Garrettsville, Ohio 
CECIL C. McVAY, Greensburg, 

Pennsylvania 
CHARLES L. MELENYZER, Charleroi, 

Pennsylvania 
WILLIAM MONTAGNA, Portland, Oregon 
ARCH A. MOORE, JR., Glen Dale and 

Charleston, West Virginia 
ROBERT M. MORRIS, Houston, Texas 
SETH C. MORROW, Delray Beach, Florida 
WALTER PATENGE, Lansing, Michigan 
JAMES O PEARSON, Wheeling, West 

Virginia 
JOHN PHILLIPS, Wheeling, West Virginia 
JENNINGS RANDOLPH, Washington, D.C. 
W. ARTHUR RUSH, North Hollywood, 

California 
ARTHUR M. SCOTT, Wheeling, West 

Virginia 
RAYMOND K. SHELINE, Tallahassee, 

Florida 
HULETT C. SMITH, Beckley, West Virginia 
ELVIS STAHR, JR., Greenwich, 

Connecticut 
ELEANOR STEBER, New York, New York 
A. KARL SUMMERS, Parkersburg, West 

Virginia 
GEORGE M. SUTTON, Norman, Oklahoma 
ARTHUR A. WELLS, Newell, West 

Virginia 
DAVID A. WERBLIN, East Rutherford, 

New Jersey 
BROOKS E. WIGGINTON, Wheeling, West 

Virginia 

C. E. WOLF, New Martinsville, West 
Virginia 

ALFRED E. WRIGHT, JR., Uniontown, 
Pennsylvania 

BOARD OF VISITORS 

ROBERT C. DIX, Bellaire, Ohio 
ROBERT W. EWING, JR., Wheeling, West 

Virginia 
CARLYLE D. FARNSWORTH, Wheeling, 

West Virginia 
LAURANCE GOOD, Wheeling, West 

Virginia 
GORDON B. GUENTHER, Wheeling, West 

Virginia 

D. MILTON GUTMAN, JR., Wheeling, West 
Virginia 

ROBERT C. HAZLETT, JR., Wheeling, 

West Virginia 
JOSEPH I. STEELE, Wheeling, West 

Virginia 
THOMAS W. TUCKER, Wheeling, West 

Virginia 
GEORGE S. WEAVER, JR., Wheeling, 

West Virginia 



123 



ALUMNI COUNCIL MEMBERS 
1980-81 

DAVID B. ANDREWS, Hackensack, New 

Jersey 
DAVID A. BUTZ, Gates Mills, Ohio 
MARC CHERNENKO, Morgantown, West 

Virginia 
STEPHEN K. CHERNICKY, Bethel Park, 

Pennsylvania 
RICHARD CIPULLO, Export, 

Pennsylvania 
WILBUR H. CRAMBLET, JR., Bethany, 

West Virginia 
RALPH DEFLIN, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 
KARL KENNEDY DUNLAP, Columbus, 

Ohio 
PETER D. ERBE, Springfield, Virginia 
DONALD FORD, Warren, Ohio 
ANNE HARNER FOREMAN, Allison Park, 

Pennsylvania 
R. NOEL FOREMAN, Wheeling, West 

Virginia 
JOE FUNK, Wellsburg, West Virginia 
MARJORIE SEABRIGHT GRIFFIN, 

Wheeling, West Virginia 
BENJAMIN GRIFFITH, Bethel Park, 

Pennsylvania 
VAL GUNDLING, Wheeling, West Virginia 
FRANCIS L. HAUS III, Pittsburgh, 

Pennsylvania 
J. HARRY LAMMERT, Pittsburgh, 

Pennsylvania 
DALE LAUGHNER. Beaver Falls, 

Pennsylvania 
S. DEAN LESIAK, Louisville, Kentucky 
C. A. LINN, Mountain Lakes, New Jersey 
BILLIE SUE SWINDLER LYNCH, 

President, Canfield, Ohio 
ROBERT L. MARTIN, Columbus, Ohio 
JOSEPH W. MAYERNICK, Weirton, West 

Virginia 
RICHARD MEESS, Pittsburgh, 

Pennsylvania 
DAYTON PRYOR, Allentown, Pennsylvania 
NANCY TOMASEK RATCLIFFE, 

Wheeling, West Virginia 
ROBERT RILEY, Bethany, West Virginia 
EDWIN SCHULZ, Kettering, Ohio 
JOHN TAYLOR, Bethany, West Virginia 
ROBERT TAYLOR, Warren, Ohio 
KENNETH W. VALUSKA, Vice President , 

Steubenville, Ohio 
DOROTHY FURBER WASSMAN, Mars, 

Pennsylvania 

TRUSTEE MEMBERS EXOFFICIO 

JAMES L. COLLINS, Wheeling, West 

Virginia 
ROBERT CORY, Beaver Falls, 

Pennsylvania 
JOHN COSTELLO, Charleroi, Pennsylvania 
DR. RODNEY HURL, Marysville, Ohio 
MICHAEL KASARDA, Bellaire, Ohio 



ADMINISTRATION 

TODD H. BULLARD, President 
ROBERT A. SANDERCOX, Vice President 
and Director of Development 

HIRAM J. LESTER, Associate Director of 

Development 
RUTH WESTLAKE, Director of Public 

Information and Publications 

WM. DANIEL COBB, III, Vice President 
and Dean of Faculty 

JOSEPH M. KUREY, Assistant Dean for 
Academic Administration and Registrar, 
Director of Institutional Research, and 
Director of the Summer School 

RUTH L. MARTIN, Assistant to the 
Registrar 

NANCY SANDERCOX, Head Librarian. 

RICK P. WILLIAMSON, Director of the 

Media Center 
DAVID M. HUTTER, Director of Athletics 
LEONORA BALLA CAYARD, Coordinator 

of International Education Programs 
LARRY E. GRIMES, Director of Liberal 

Studies 

JOHN S. CUNNINGHAM, Dean of 
Students 

DARLINE B. NICHOLSON, Associate 

Dean of Students and Director ofRenner 

Union 
JOHN C. GIESMANN, Assistant Dean of 

Students for Residence Hall Programs 
JOSEPH B. MCGRAW, Assistant Dean of 

Students and Coordinator of Freshmen 

Residence Halls 
KATHRYN PHILLIBEN, Director of 

Counseling and Testing 
THEODORE W. BUNNELL, Director of 

Financial Aid 
MYLA KOVACS, Financial Aid Officer 
NANCY AULT, Director of Placement 
DAVID J. WOTTLE, Director of Admission 
M. LYNDA KELSESKY, Admission 

Counselor 
MICHAEL E. LAUGHNER, Admission 

Counselor 
KENNETH A. ZIRM, Admission Counselor 
JOANNE SYKES, R.N., Supervisor of 

Infirmary 
NICHOLAS POULOS, M.D., College 

Physician 
BASIL P. PAPADIMITRIOUS, M.D., 

College Physician 
WILLIAM B. ALLEN, College Chaplain 
CRAIG A. REPP, Assistant to the College 

Chaplain 
DANIEL M. LOWY, Jewish Chaplain 
W. CARROLL THORN, Episcopal Chaplain 

JOHN A. GRAHAM, Treasurer and 
Business Manager 

JOHN L. HOFFMAN, Director of Physical 

Plant 
SHIRLEY JACOB, Assistant Treasurer and 

Accountant 
GARY P. ARMITAGE, Managing Director 

of Leadership Center and Greskam House 
GEORGE S. BAUMAN, JR., Manager of 

College Stores 
ROBERT CON AWAY, Chief Engineer 
DAVID COUNTY, Director of Auxiliary 

Services 
LYNN E. QUEEN, Director of Data 

Processing 
RICHARD RUGGIERO, Director of Dining 

Service 
JEAN SCHWERTFEGER, Supervisor of 

the Mailroom 



THE FACULTY 

TODD H. BULLARD, President of the 

College on the M.M. Cochran Foundation. 

(1980). 

Bethany College; B.A., West Liberty State 

College; M.A., West Virginia University; 

Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh. 

WM. DANIEL COBB II, Vice President and 
Dean of Faculty. (1977). 
A.B., Transylvania College; B.D., S.T.M., 
Yale University; A.M., Ph.D., The 
University of Chicago. 

ROBERT A. SANDERCOX, Vice President 
and Director of Development. (1957). 
B.A., Bethany'College; M.Div., Yale 
University; University of Buffalo; West 
Virginia University. 

JOHN S. CUNNINGHAM, Dean of 

Students. (1967). 

B.S., Slippery Rock State College; M.Ed., 

Kent State University; West Virginia 

University. 

Emeriti 

FORREST H. KIRKPATRICK, Dean of 

Students and Professor Emeritus 
(1927-1940; 1946-1952) and Adjunct 
Professor of Economics and Business. 
(1970). 

University of Dijon; B.A., Bethany College; 
M.A., and Prof. Dipl., Columbia University; 
University of Pittsburgh; University of 
London; University of Pennsylvania; 
University of Cambridge; LL.D., Bethany 
College; LL.D., College of Steubenville; 
LL.D., Drury College. 

JOHN J. KNIGHT, Professor of Physical 

Education Emeritus. (1930-1970). 

B.A., West Virginia Wesleyan College; M.A., 

Ohio State University; University of 

Michigan. 

BENJAMIN C. SHAW. Professor of History 
and Political Science Emeritus. (1935-1967). 
B.A., Rollins College; M.A., Ph.D., 
University of North Carolina; American 
Academy in Rome; Royal University, 
Perugia, Italy. 

EARL D. McKENZIE, Professor of Foreign 
Languages Emeritus. (1937-1972). 
B.A., Brown University; M.A., Columbia 
University; M.Litt., Ph.D., University of 
Pittsburgh; University of Frankfurt am 
Main; Yale University; University of Paris. 



BRADFORD TYE, Associate Professor of 
Mathematics Emeritus. (1943-1973). 
B.S., Alma White College; M.S., New York 
University; Rutgers University; Columbia 
University; University of Pittsburgh. 

MARGARET R. WOODS, Associate 
Professor of Foreign Languages Emeritus. 
(1943-1961). 

B.A., Wellesley College; M.A., Pennsylvania 
State University; Middlebury College; 
Columbia University; Colorado College; 
University of Besancon; University of San 
Luis Potosi. 

GEORGE K. HAUPTFUEHRER, Professor 
of Music Emeritus. (1945-1977). 
B.A., B.M., Friends University; M.A., 
University of Kansas; Pittsburgh Musical 
Institute; Juilliard School of Music; Indiana 
University. 

S. ELIZABETH REED, Associate Professor 
of Physical Education Emeritus. 
(1945-1975). 

B.A., Muskingum College; M.Ed., 
University of Pittsburgh; University of 
Wisconsin; New York University; University 
of Wyoming; University of Southern 
California; University of Michigan. 

MARGARET MATHISON, Professor of 
Education Emeritus. (1951-1974). 
B.A., M.Litt., University of Pittsburgh; 
University of Southern California; 
Pennsylvania State University; Ohio State 
University. 

WINIFRED WEBSTER, Dean of Women 

and Instructor in English Emeritus. 

(1952-1960). 

B.A., University of North Dakota; M.A., 

Columbia University. 

PERRY E. GRESHAM, President 
Emeritus. (1953-1972). 
B.A., B.D., Texas Christian University; 
LL.D., Texas Christian University; Litt.D., 
Culver Stockton College; L.H.D., Chapman 
College; Ed.D., Transylvania University; 
University of Chicago; Columbia University; 
Litt. D., University of Cincinnati; Ed.D., 
Findlay College: Ped.D., Youngstown 
University; D.B.A., Lawrence Institute of 
Technology; H.H.D., Bethany College. 

SUSAN W. HANNA, Instructor in Health 

and Physical Education Emeritus. 

(1957-1977). 

B.A., Bethany College; Marjorie Webster 

School of Physical Education. 

JOHN A. SPENCE, Professor of Education 

Emeritus. (1961-1976). 

B.S.Ed., M.A., Ph.D., Ohio State University. 

HSIOH-REN WEI, Professor of Physics and 
Public Affairs Emeritus. (1963-1972). 
B.A., University of Nanking; Ph.D., 
University of Chicago. 

THEODORE R. KIMPTON, Assistant 

Professor of Foreign Languages Emeritus. 

(1965-1974). 

B.S., United States Military Academy; M.A., 

University of Maryland; Catholic University; 

Laval University. 



124 



DOROTHY HUESTIS, Assistant Professor 
of Education Emeritus. (1969-1976). 
B.A., M.A., Indiana University. 

CHARLES E. HALT, Professor of 
Economics Emeritus. (1969-1977). 
B.S., Slippery Rock State College; M.Ed., 
Pennsylvania State University; Ph.D., 
Syracuse University; University of 
Pittsburgh. 

Professors 

HELEN LOUISE McGUFFIE, Professor of 
English and Head of the Department. (1947). 
B.A., Bethany College; M.A., University of 
Pittsburgh; Ph.D., Columbia University; 
Oxford University. 

J. DANIEL DRAPER, Professor of 

Chemistry and Head of the Department. 

(1951). 

B.S., Franklin and Marshall College; Ph.D., 

University of Maryland; Michigan State 

University. 

JOHN R. TAYLOR, Professor of English 
and Head of the Department of Fine Arts. 
(1955). 

B.A., Bethany College; M.A., Princeton 
University; University of Akron; University 
of Kansas; University of Birmingham, 
England; University of Edinburgh; Oxford 
University. 

JAMES W. CARTY, JR., Professor of 
Communications. (1959). 
B.A., Culver-Stockton; B.D., University of 
Chicago; M.S., Northwestern University; 
University of Oklahoma; George Peabody 
College; Scaritt College; Saltillo (Mexico) 
State Teachers College; Diploma from 
National University of Nicaragua; Diploma 
from University of San Carlos; Ohio 
University; University of Denver; 
Universidad Iberoamericana. 

RICHARD B. KENNEY, T.W. Phillips 

Professor of Old Testament Literature and 

Head of the Department of Religious Studies. 

(1964). 

B.A., Washington University; B.D., M.A., 

Ph.D., Yale University; Basel University; 

McGill University; University of Tubingen. 

ROBERT E. MYERS, Professor of 

Philosophy and Head of the Department. 

(1964). 

B.A., Bethany College; B.D., Texas 

Christian University; Ph.D., Ohio State 

University. 



HIRAM J. LESTER, Professor of Religious 
Studies and Associate Director of 
Development. (1965). 

B.A., B.D., Phillips University; M.A., Ph.D., 
Yale University; Johnson Bible College. 

J. TREVOR PEIRCE, Professor of 

Psychology and Head of the Department. 

(1969). 

B.A., Princeton University; Ph.D., 

University of California. 

BURTON B. THURSTON, Professor of 
Middle Eastern Studies. (1970). 
B.Th., Northwest Christian College; B.A., 
Transylvania University; B.D., Butler School 
of Religion; M.A., Butler University; Th.D., 
Harvard University; University of Chicago; 
New York University; University of 
Tubingen. 

ARTHUR Z. KOVACS, Professor of Physics 
and Head of the Department. (1978). 
A.B., Wabash College; Ph.D., Duke 
University. 

RALPH A. MAGGIO, Professor of 
Economics and Business and Head of the 
Department. (1978). 

B.A., Boston University; M.Sc, Rutgers 
University; M.B.A., University of 
Pittsburgh; Ph.D., Ohio State University. 

Associate Professors 

WILLIAM L. YOUNG, Associate Professor 
of History and Political Science and Head of 
the Department. (1950). 
B.A., Bethany College; M.A., Ohio State 
University; Columbia University. 

JAMES E. ALLISON, Associate Professor 

of Mathematics and Head of the Department. 

(1964). 

B.S.. Bethany College; M.A., West Virginia 

University; Texas Christian University. 

GARY E. LARSON, Associate Professor of 
Biology and Head of the Department. (1964). 
B.S., M.S., New York State University, 
Albany; Ph.D., Rutgers University; Albany 
Medical College. 

JOHN D. DAVIS, Associate Professor of 
Economics and Business. (1965). 
B.A., American International College; M.A., 
University of Connecticut; West Virginia 
University; University of Chicago. 

JOHN U. DAVIS, Associate Professor of 

Education. (1966). 

B.A., Bethany College; M.A., Ed.D., 

Columbia University; University of 

Nebraska; Oxford University; West Virginia 

University. 

DAVID J. JUDY, Associate Professor of 
English and Theatre and Head of the 
Department of Theatre. (1967). 
B.A., Denison University; M.A., Western 
Reserve; University of Mexico; West 
Virginia University; Oxford University. 

A. ROY KIRKPATRICK, Associate 

Professor of History and Political Science. 
(1967). - 

A. A., Trenton Junior College; B.S.Ed., 
Northeast Missouri State Teachers College; 
M.A., Ph.D., University of Missouri. 

STANLEY L. BECKER, Associate 
Professor of General Science. (1968). 
B.S., New York State College of Forestry; 
Ph.D., University of Wisconsin. 



ALBERT R. BUCKELEW, JR., Associate 
Professor of Biology. (1969). 
B.S., Fairleigh Dickinson University; Ph.D., 
University of New Hampshire. 

RICHARD G. STEBBINS, Associate 
Professor of Chemistry. (1969). 
B.A., Wesleyan University; Ph.D., Texas 
A&M University. 

LEONORA BALLA CAYARD, Associate 
Professor of Foreign Languages and Head of 
the Department. (1970). 
Ph.D., Marburg University; Yale University. 

LARRY E. GRIMES, Associate Professor of 

English and Director of Liberal Studies. 

(1970). 

B.A., Bethany College; B.D.. Yale Divinity 

School; Ph.D., Emory University. 

PAULINE R. NELSON, Associate Professor 
of Foreign Languages. (1971). 
B.A., Upsala College; M.A., Ph.D., 
University of Pittsburgh. 

DAVID T. BROWN, Associate Professor of 
Mathematics. (1974). 
B.A., Ottawa University; M.A., Ph.D., 
Syracuse University. 

T. GALE THOMPSON, Associate Professor 

of Psychology. (1974). 

B.A., M.A., Ph.D., University of Missouri. 

DAVID M. H UTTER, Associate Professor of 
Physical Education and Head of the 
Department. (1976). 

B.S., M.S., Ohio University; Ph.D., Ohio 
State University. 

LYNN ADKINS, Associate Professor of 

Sociology and Social Work and Head of the 

Department. (1978). 

A.B., Marshal] University; M.S.W., West 

Virginia University; Ph.D., University of 

Pittsburgh. 

ROY S. FOX, Associate Professor of 
Economics and Accounting. (1978). 
B.S., Boston University; C.P.A., M.S., 
Massachusetts State College; Ph.D., 
Northwestern University. 

WILLIAM A. HERZOG, JR., Associate 

Professor of Communications and Head of 

the Department. (1978). 

B.A., Wheaton College; M.A., Indiana 

University; Ph.D., Michigan State 

University. 

ANN C. SHELLY, Associate Professor of 

Education, Head of the Department and 

Director of Teacher Preparation Programs. 

(1978). 

B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Michigan State 

University. 



Assistant Professors 

ALBERT R. DeVAUL, Assistant Professor 
of Music and Program Director. (1964). 
B.A., West Liberty State College; M.M., 
West Virginia University; Carnegie-Mellon 
University. 

JOHN W. LOZIER, Assistant Professor of 
History. (1964). 

B.A., University of Colorado; M.A., Ph.D., 
The Ohio State University. 

W. RANDOLPH COOEY, Assistant 
Professor of Economics and Business. (1966). 
B.A., Bethany College; M.A., West Virginia 
University; Mississippi State University. 

ANTHONY L. MITCH, Assistant Professor 
of English. (1967). 

B.A., Cornell University; M.A., St. John's 
University; New York University. 

WESLEY J. WAGNER, Assistant Professor 
of Art. (1967). 

Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts; 
Barnes Foundation. 

E. DONALD AULT, Assistant Professor of 
Physical Education. (1968). 
B.A., West Liberty State College; M.A., 
Marshall University. 

WALTER L. KORNOWSKI, Assistant 
Professor of Art and Head of the 
Department. (1968). 

B.F.A., Rochester Institute of Technology; 
M.S., State University College of Buffalo; 
M.F.A., West Virginia University. 

NANCY SANDERCOX, Head Librarian. 

(1971). 

B.A., Bethany College; M.L.S., University of 

Pittsburgh. 

MILTON R. SMITH, JR., Assistant 
Professor of Chemistry. (1972). 
B.S., Sul Ross State University; Ph.D., 
Texas A&M University; Ohio State 
University. 

RICK P. WILLIAMSON, Assistant 
Professor of Education Media and Director 
of the Media Center. (1975). 
B.A., M.A., University of South Dakota. 

JAMES E. DAFLER, Assistant Professor of 
Physical Education. (1976). 
B.A., Capital University; M.Ed., Ohio 
University; Marietta College. 

LARRY LEE HOUTS, Assistant Professor 
of Biology. (1976). 

A.B., Rockford College; M.S., Florida State 
University; Ph.D., State University of New 
York at Albany; Duke University; West 
Virginia University. 

JOHN H. HULL, Assistant Professor of 

Psychology. (1976). 

B.S., Alma College; M.A., Ph.D., Kent State 

University. 

WILLIAM P. CROSBIE. Assistant 
Professor of Music and Acting Department 
Head. (1977). 

A.B., Whittier College; M.M., D.M.A., West 
Virginia University. 

JAMES J. HUMES, Assistant Professor of 

Communications. (1977). 

B.A., Geneva College; M.A., West Virginia 

University. 

SALLY I. DORWART, Assistant Professor 
of Physical Education and Coordinator of 
Women's Athletics. (1977). 
B.S., M.S., West Virginia University. 



125 



SUZANNE CARROLL, Assistant Professor 
jf Communications. (1978). 
B.A., St. Mary College; M.A., University of 
Notre Dame; Ph.D., Indiana University. 

HUMBERTO RISSO, Assistant Professor of 
Foreign Languages. (1978). 
B.A., University of Chile; M.A., University 
of Michigan; Ph.D., University of Miami. 

DELLA W. SHELDON, Assistant Professor 
of History and Political Science. (1978). 
B.A., Sacramento State University; Ph.D., 
Claremont Graduate School. 

BARBARA J. DIVINS, Assistant Professor 
of Education. (1979). 

B.A., Indiana University of Pennsylvania; 
M.S., Slippery Rock State College; Ed.D.. 
West Virginia University. 

CAROLYN P. CASTEEL, Assistant 

Professor of Education. (1980). 

B.S., M.A., Ed.D., West Virginia University. 

PAUL E. DISS, JR., Assistant Professor of 
Sociology and Social Work. (1980). 
A.B., Wheeling College; M.S.W., Fordham 
University; New York Center for 
Psychoanalytic Training. 

FRANK GERALD DILLASHAW, Assistant 
Professor of Education. (1980). 
B.S., Furman University; M.A.T., Converse 
College; Ed.D., University of Georgia. 

Instructors 

BARBARA L. BOYER, Instructor in 

Communications. (1979). 

B.A., Hastings College; M.A., Marshall 

University. 

KURT P. DUDT, Instructor in 

Communications. (1979). 

B.S., M.S., Clarion State College. 

DAVID A. JOLLIFFE, Instructor in 
English and Theatre. (1980). 
B.A., Bethany College; M.A., West Virginia 
University; Southern Illinois University. 

MICHAEL WESCOTT LODER, Instructor 
in Library Sciences and Assistant 
Librarian for Public Services. (1980). 
B.A., Union College (N.Y.); M.S., M.L.S., 
University of Oregon. 

MARY ELLEN FISKE. Instructor in 
Physical Education. (1980). 
B.S., Southern Connecticut State College; 
M.S., Florida International University. 

JOHN J. MCGOWAN. Instructor of 

Physical Education. (1980). 

B.S., Manhattan College; M.S., Springfield 

College. 

Adjunct Faculty and Lecturers 

MARJORIE T. CARTY, Lecturer in Foreign 
Languages. (1965). 
Ph.B., University of Chicago; Clark 
University; Saltillo (Mexico) State Teachers 
College; University of Nicaragua; Bethany 
College; West Virginia University; 
University of Puerto Rico; Universidad 
Iberoamericana. 



ROBYN R. COLE, Lecturer in English. 

(1968). 

B.A., University of Maryland; M.A., 

University of Georgia; Ohio University. 

WILLIAM B. ALLEN, Chaplain of the 

College. (1970). 

B.A., Bethany College; M.Div., Yale Divinity 

School. 

OLIVER MANNING, Artist in Residence. 

(1972). 

B.M., Louisiana State College; M.M., 

Cincinnati College - Conservatory of Music. 

RUTH WESTLAKE, Lecturer in 
Communications. (1975). 
B.A., Kent State University; Ohio 
University. 

ROBERT NICOLL, Lecturer in Art. (1978). 
B.A., William Paterson State College; 
M.F.A., Rochester Institute of Technology. 

DANIEL M. LOWY, Lecturer in Religious 
Studies. (1979). 

A.B., New York University; M.H.L., Hebrew 
Union College (New York); D.D., Hebrew 
Union College (Cincinnati). 

JAMES WELDON THOMPSON, Director 

of Tubingen Program. (1979). 

B.A., M.A., Abilene Christian University; 

B.D., Union Theological Seminary; Ph.D., 

Vanderbilt University; University of 

Tubingen. 

META M. LASCH, Lecturer in Theatre. 

(1980). 

B.A., West Liberty State College; M.A., 

University of Pittsburgh. 

ANNE EDDY, Lecturer in Music. (1980). 
B.M., M.M.E., West Virginia University. 

JENNIFER COFFIELD, Lecturer in 
Theatre. (1980). 

B.F.A., West Virginia University; M.A., 
Southern Illinois University. 

JACQUES FICHOU, Lecturer in Foreign 
Languages. (1980). 

Diplome d'etude universitaire general. 
University of Brest, France. 

BETHANY BERNSTEIN, Lecturer in 

Music. (1980). 

B.M., M.M., Duquesne University. 

MARTIN BERNSTEIN. Lecturer in Music. 

(1980). 

B.M., M.M., Duquesne University. 

BRIAN GUM, Lecturer in Music. (1980). 
B.M., M.M., Texas Tech University. 

Faculty Committees and Boards 

Student members are appointed annually 
to many of the following committees and 
boards by the President of the College and 
upon the recommendation of the Student 
Board of Governors. 

ADMISSION 

Richard B. Kenney, Convener; James E. 
Allison, John S. Cunningham, James E. 
Dafler, John D. Davis. David J. Judy, Arthur 
Z. Kovacs, Pauline R. Nelson, David J. 
Wottle. 

ATHLETICS 

Albert R. DeVaul, Convener; E. Donald Ault, 
Sally I. Dorwart, David M. Hutter (ex 
officio), Humberto Risso, Wesley J. Wagner. 



BOARD OF COMMUNICATIONS 

William A. Herzog, Jr., Secretary; Barbara 
L. Boyer, Suzanne Carroll, James W. Carty, 
Jr., John U. Davis, Kurt P, Dudt, John A. 
Graham, James J. Humes, David J. Judy, 
Ruth Westlake. Students: Editors and 
Business Managers of publications, Student 
Managers of WVBC-FM and Channel 3-TV. 
The President of the Student Board of 
Governors serves as Convener of the Board. 

CAREER ADVISEMENT 

John S. Cunningham, Convener; Lynn 
Adkins, Nancy Ault, Barbara L. Boyer, 
Leonora B. Cayard, William P. Crosbie, 
James E. Dafler, Paul E. Diss, Jr., Robert E. 
Myers, Kathryn Philliben, Humberto Risso, 
Delia W. Sheldon, Richard G. Stebbins, 
William L. Young. 

COLLEGE ACTIVITIES 

David M. Hutter, Convener: Barbara L. 
Boyer, William P. Crosbie, Albert R. DeVaul, 
Sally I. Dorwart, James J. Humes, Walter L. 
Kornowski, Anthony L. Mitch, Darline B. 
Nicholson, John R. Taylor, Wesley J. 
Wagner. 

COMPUTER ADVISORY 

Arthur Z. Kovacs, Convener; James E. 
Allison, Roy S. Fox, John A. Graham, 
Joseph M. Kurey, Ralph A. Maggio, Lynn 
Queen, Milton R. Smith, Jr. 

CURRICULUM 

Wm. Daniel Cobb, Convener; James E. 
Allison, John D. Davis, Larry E. Grimes, 
William A. Herzog, Jr., David M. Hutter, 
Joseph M. Kurey, Hiram J. Lester (ex 
officio), Robert E. Myers, Ann C. Shelly, 
Robert G. Stebbins. 

EXTERNAL PROGRAMS 

Lynn Adkins, Convener; Gary P. Armitage, 
Leonora B. Cayard, W. Randolph Cooey, 
Barbara J. Divins, Kurt P. Dudt, John A. 
Graham, Roy S. Fox, Walter L. Kornowski, 
Joseph M. Kurey, Gary E. Larson, Hiram J. 
Lester, Ralph A. Maggio, Ann C. Shelly. 

FACULTY BUDGET 

James E. Allison, Physical and Life Sciences 
(1983); John D. Davis, AtLarge (1981); 
Anthony L. Mitch, Humanities (1983); Ann 
C. Shelly, Social Sciences (1982); Robert E. 
Myers, Representative to the Board of 
Trustees. 

FACULTY DEVELOPMENT 

J. Trevor Peirce, Convener; E. Donald Ault, 
Stanley L. Becker, Suzanne Carroll, John U. 
Davis, Barbara J. Divins, James J. Humes, 
A. Roy Kirkpatrick, T Gale Thompson. 

FACULTY PERSONNEL 

Stanley L. Becker, Convener, Physical and 
Life Sciences (1981); John D. Davis, Social 
Sciences (1982); Pauline R. Nelson, 
Humanities (1983); James E. Allison, 
A t-Large (1983). 

FACULTY WELFARE 

Albert R. Buckelew, Jr., (1981); W. Randolph 
Cooey (1982); Pauline R. Nelson (1982); 
Richard G. Stebbins (1981); John H. Hull 
(1983); Sally I. Dorwart (1983). 



GANS AWARD 

Gary E. Larson, Convener; Albert R. 
Buckelew, J. Daniel Draper, John H. Hull, 
Arthur Z. Kovacs, J. Trevor Peirce, Milton 
R. Smith, Jr. 

HONORS 

Robert E. Myers, Convener; Nancy Ault, 
James W. Carty, Jr., John S. Cunningham, J. 
Daniel Draper, Richard B. Kenney, Robert 

A. Sandercox, John R. Taylor, Burton B. 
Thurston, William L. Young. 

INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES 

Larry E. Grimes, Convener; Stanley L. 
Becker, Carolyn P. Casteel, Roy S. Fox, 
Larry L. Houts, T. Gale Thompson, Burton 

B. Thurston. 

ORIENTATION 

Richard B. Kenney, Convener; William B. 
Allen, William P. Crosbie, John S. 
Cunningham, James E. Dafler, Larry E. 
Grimes, J. Trevor Peirce, Kathryn Philliben, 
T. Gale Thompson, David J. Wottle. 

POLICY APPEALS 

Joseph M. Kurey, Convener; Albert R. 
Buckelew, Wm. Daniel Cobb, W. Randolph 
Cooey, John S. Cunningham, Richard B. 
Kenney, Anthony L. Mitch, Milton R. Smith, 
Jr. 

PRACTICUM REVIEW 

John H. Hull, Convener; Carolyn P. Casteel, 
Leonora Balla Cayard, Paul E. Diss Jr., 
Sally I. Dorwart, Larry E. Grimes, Larry L. 
Houts, David J. Judy. 

PROGRAM DEVELOPMENT 

Wm. Daniel Cobb, Convener; Larry E. 
Grimes, William A. Herzog, Jr., Arthur Z. 
Kovacs, Joseph M. Kurey, Gary E. Larson, 
Hiram J. Lester, J. Trevor Peirce. 

RELIGIOUS LIFE 

Burton B. Thurston, Convener; William B. 
Allen, James W. Carty, Jr., Paul E. Diss, Jr., 
Kurt P. Dudt, John C. Giesmann, William A. 
Herzog, Jr., Richard B. Kenney, Daniel M. 
Lowy, Wesley J. Wagner. 

STUDENT LIFE 

John S. Cunningham, Convener; E. Donald 
Ault, Carolyn P. Casteel, Paul E. Diss, Jr., 
John H. Hull, David M. Hutter; Ex officio 
members: John C. Giesmann, Larry E. 
Grimes, Darline B. Nicholson, Kathryn 
Philliben, Joanne Sykes. 

TEACHER EDUCATION 

Pauline R. Nelson, Convener; Lynn Adkins, 
Albert R. DeVaul, David M. Hutter, A. Roy 
Kirkpatrick, Walter L. Kornowski, Arthur Z. 
Kovacs, Anthony L. Mitch, Ann C. Shelly. 

COLLEGE COUNCIL AND FACULTY 
SENATE 

The College Council advises the president 
of the College on matters of student 
relations and the impact of policies and 
practices on student life. Its membership is 
comprised of senior administration and 
faculty who are designated by the president, 
and of presidents of fraternities, sororities 
and house associations. The Dean of 
Students chairs the council. 

The Faculty Senate discusses issues 
regarding the educational programs of the 
College and advises the president of 
academic concerns. Membership includes all 
department heads, full professors, executive 
officers, and three other elected faculty 
members. The Dean of Faculty is president 
of the Senate. 



126 



Index 



A 

Academic Advisor 40 

Academic Common Market 44 

Academic Program 39 

Accreditation and Member- 
ships, Bethany College . 5 
Administrative Officers ... 124 

Admission 25 

Admission Office Hours . 27 

Advanced Placement .... 27 

Application for Admission 25 
Application for 

Readmission 29 

Community/Junior 

College Graduates 27 

Early Admission 27 

Foreign Students 27 

High School Preparation . 25 

Interviews 27 

Transfer Students 27 

Advisors 18 

Career Interests 18 

Freshmen 18 

Senior 18 

Special Services 18 

Allied Health Professions . . 18 

Alumni Council 124 

Alumni Field House 7 

American History, 

Course in 90 

Anthropology 119 

Appalachian Satellite 

Program 47 

Applied Music, Courses in . 99 

Art, Courses in 53 

Art History, Courses in ... . 55 

Assets of College, Value of . 6 

Astronomy 56 

Athletics 16 

Awards 21 



B 

Band 15 

Benedum Commons 7 

Bethany House 7 

Bethany Plan 39 

Bethany Profile 5 

Biology, Courses in 57 

Board, Cost of 29 

Board of Communications 15 

Board of Fellows 123 

Board of Trustees 123 

Board of Visitors 123 

Buildings 6 

C 

Cable 3 15 

Calendar 2, 40 

CampbellHall 7 

Certification, Elementary and 

Secondary Education ... 73 

Chamber Music 15 

Change of Schedule 48 

Changes in Regulations . . 49 

Chemistry, Courses in 59 

Chemistry, Professional 

Preparation for 19 

Choir, Brass 15 

Choir, Concert 15 

Class Attendance Policy . . 48 

Classification of Students 48 

Cochran Hall 7 

CollegeLife 13 

Columbia University 

Combined Plan 44 

Commencement Hall 6 

Committee on Admission . 25 
Committees: Board of 

Trustees 123 

Committees: Faculty, Staff 

and Students 126 

Communications, 

Courses in 61 

Comprehensive Charges 29 
Computer Science, 

Courses in 64 

Cooperative U.S. Study 

Offerings 44 

Contents, Table of 3 

Continuing Education 

Program 46 

Counseling 17 



Course Descriptions 51 

Course Load 47 

Course Offerings, 

Scheduleof 49 

Cramblet Hall 7 

Cross-Listed Courses, 

Policy on 47 

Cultural Activities 14 

Curriculum 6 

D 

Deanof Faculty 124 

Dean of Students 124 

Dean's List 19 

Dentistry 18 

Designated Scholarships . 35 

Directories 123 

Distribution Requirement 41 

Drawing Account, Student 31 

E 

Economics and Business, 

Courses in 65 

Education, Courses in 68 

Elementary Education . . 69 

Endowment Fund, Value of 6 

Engineering 19 

Engineering Programs .... 44 

English, Courses in 76 

Enrollment 5 

European and World 

History 90 

External Trust 

Scholarships 37 



Facilities and Equipment, 

Valueof 6 

Faculty, List of 124 



Fees 29 

Admission 29 

Art 30 

Board 29 

Breakage 30 

Matriculation 29 

Music 30 

Overseas Programs 30 

Readmission 29 

Registration Deposit 29 

Room 29 

Special 30 

Tuition 29 

Field of Concentration ... 42 

Financial Aid 31 

Financial Assistance, 

Officeof 32 

Fine Arts, Courses in 81 

Foreign Language, 

Courses in 83 

Foreign Students, 

Admission of 27 

Fraternities 14 

French, Courses in 83 

Freshman Interdisciplinary 

Lecture Courses 51 

Freshman Seminars 51 

Freshman Studies 
Program 40,51 

G 

General Scholarships 32 

General Sciences, 

Course in 87 

Geography, Courses in ... . 88 
Georgia Tech Dual- 
Degree Program 44 

German, Courses in 84 

Goals, Bethany College 6 

Government, Student 13 

Grading System 48 

Graduation Honors 19 

Graduation Requirements 40 

Greek, Course in 86 

Graphic Design, 

Courses in 55 

Gresham House 7 



127 



H 

HarlanHall 10 

Health Services 16 

Heuristics 88 

History, Bethany College . . 5 
History and Political Science, 

Courses in 89 

Honor Societies 20 

Housing 13 

I 

Independent Studies 44 

Infirmary 16 

Interdisciplinary Studies . 93 
Interdisciplinary Lecture 

Courses 51 

Internships, Policy on 43 

Intramurals 16 

Invalidation of Credits .... 49 

Irvin Gymnasium 7 

J 

January Term 44 

Junior/Community College 

Graduates, Admission of . 27 



K 



Knight Natatorium 7 



L 

Law 18 

Leadership Center 7, 46 

Leisure Studies 104 

Library 10, 94 

Literature and Theory of 

Music, Courses in 97 

Loan Funds 37 

Location, Bethany College . 5 

M 

Madrid Study Program . . 46 

Map of the Area 4 

Map of the Campus 8,9 

Mathematics, Courses in . . 95 

McEachern Hall 

Refer to Campus Map 

McLean Hall 8, 9 

Refer to Campus Map 

Media Center 10 

Medicine 18 

Merrill-Palmer 

Institute Semester . 45, 111 

Monthly Payment Plans 31 

MorlanHaU 10 

Music 15 

Music, Courses in 97 

Musical Organizations .... 15 



Oglebay Hall 7 

Old Main 6 

Overseas Study Programs . 46 

Oxford Semester 46 

P 

Parents' Confidential 

Statement 31 

Paris Sorbonne Program . 46 

Pendleton Heights 6 

Phillips Hall 10 

Phillips Memorial Library . 10 

Philosophy, Courses in . 101 
Physical Education and 

Health, Courses in 103 

Physics, Courses in 108 

Placement 17 

Policy Appeals Board 40 

Political Science, Courses in 89 

Practicum Program 41 



Pre- Professional Studies . . . 18 

Allied Health Professions 18 

Professional Chemistry 19 

Pre-Engineering 19 

Pre-Law 18 

Pre-Theological 19 

SocialWork 19 

Teacher Education 19 

President 124 

Probation 49 

Professional Block 72 

Pschology, Courses in Ill 

Publications, Student 15 

R 

Radio Station 15 

Refunds 29 

Registration Deposit 29 

Regulations, Student 13 

Religious Life 17 

Religious Studies, 

Courses in 114 

Renner Union 7 

Residence Life 13 

Residence Halls 10 

Residence Requirement . 44 

Richardson Hall of Science . 7 

Room and Board, Cost of 29 

S 

Scholarships, Named 32 

Scholarships, Qualifications 

for 32 

Secondary Education 71 

Senior Comprehensive 

Examination 43 



Senior Fellowships 20 

Senior Project 42 

SocialLife 14 

Social Sciences, Courses in 117 

Social Work Education ... 19 
Sociology^ and Social Work 

Courses in 118 

Sororities 14 

Spanish, Courses in 85 

Special Examinations 49 

Steinman Fine Arts Center . 7 
Student Accounts, 

Payment of 31 

Summer Programming 47 

Summer Terms 44 

Sustained Awards 37 

T 

Teacher Education, 

Admission to 72 

Teacher Education 

Requirements 68 

Television Station 15 

Theatre, Courses in 121 

Theatrical Productions . . 15 
Transfer Students, 

Admission of 27 

Transcript of Records 49 

Treasurer 124 

Tubingen Study Program 46 

Tuition, Cost of 29 

V 

Volunteers in Action 14 

W 

Washington Semester 45 

Washington University 

Three-Two Plan 44 

Withdrawals 29,43, 49 

Work Internships, 

Policy on 43 

Writing Proficiency 

Program 77 

Writing Proficiency 

Requirement 42 

WVBC-FM 15 



128 





College Bulletin 1981 - 1982 




st, 1981 




Bethany 
College 
Bulletin 
1981-1982 



Vol. LXXIV No. 3 
August 1981 
(USPS 052-420) 

Second class postage paid at Bethany, 
West Virginia, 26032. Published five 
times a year, February, April, July, 
August and October, by Bethany 
College, Bethany, West Virginia. 



Notice of Nondiscriminatory Policy 

Bethany College admits students of any 
race, color, sex, religion, handicaps, 
and national or ethnic origin to all of 
the rights, privileges, programs, and 
activities generally accorded or made 
available to students at the school. 
Bethany does not discriminate on the 
basis of race, color, sex, religion, and 
national or ethnic origin in the 
administration of its educational 
policies, admissions policies, 
scholarship and loan programs, athletic 
activities, or other school-administered 
programs. 



College 

Calendar 

1981-82 

First Semester 



August 

30-31 Sunday-Monday 

Orientation and Evaluation for new students 

September 

1 Tuesday 

Registration 

2 Wednesday 

Classes begin for all students 
8 Tuesday 
Last day for re-adjustment of schedules 
without academic and financial penalty; last 
day to add a course 
15 Tuesday 

Last day of credit/no credit 
17 Thursday 
Formal Convocation 
26 Saturday 
Homecoming 

October 

17 Saturday 

Parents' Day 
20 Tuesday 

Last day of classes for first-half of semester 
20-21 Tuesday-Wednesday 

Final exam nights for first-half semester 
courses 
23 Friday 
Mid-term grades due 



November 
2 Monday 

Writing Qualification Test for Freshmen 
Seminars 

14 Saturday 

Board of Trustees' meeting 
16-20 Monday-Friday 
Registration for second semester 
20 Friday 4 p.m. 
Thanksgiving vacation begins 
30 Monday 8 a.m. 
Thanksgiving vacation ends 

December 

15 Tuesday 

Last day of first semester classes 

16 Wednesday 
Reading Day 

17-19 Thursday-Saturday 
Final Exam Period 
28 Monday 
Final grades due 

January Term (January 4-29) 

January 

25-26 Monday-Tuesday 

Senior Comprehensive Exams (Written) 
27-30 Wednesday-Saturday 

Senior Comprehensive Exams (Oral) 



Second Semester 

January 
31 Sunday 

Registration for all students and Diagnostic 
Writing Test for all transfers and 
readmissions 

February 
1 Monday 

Classes begin for all students 

5 Friday 
Last day for re-adjustment of schedules 
without academic and financial penalty; last 
day to add a course. 

11 Thursday 
Formal Convocation 

12 Friday 

Last day for credit/no credit 

March 

4 Thursday 

Founder's Day 
11 Thursday 

Writing Qualification Tests (Sophomores and 

Juniors) 

17-18 Wednesday-Thursday 

Final exam nights for first-half semester 
courses 



19 Friday 

Last day of classes for first-half semester 
courses 

19 Friday 4 p.m. 
Spring vacation begins 
22 Monday 
Mid-term grades due 
29 Monday 8 a.m. 
Spring vacation ends 

April 

12-16 Monday-Friday 

Registration for first semester 1982-83 
15 Thursday 
Honors Day 

May 
1 Saturday 8 a.m. 

Reading period for seniors 

3 Monday 
Grades due for seniors taking comps 
10-11 Monday-Tuesday 
Senior Comprehensive Exams (Written) 
12-15 Wednesday-Saturday 
Senior Comprehensive Exams (Oral) 
14 Friday 

Grades due for seniors who took comps in 
January 

14 Friday 

Last day of second semester classes 

15 Saturday 
Alumni Day 

17-21 Monday-Friday 

Final Exam Period (use as many days as 

necessary) 

20 Thursday 1 p.m. 
Final Faculty meeting 

21 Friday 

Board of Trustees' meeting 

21 Friday 8 p.m. 
Baccalaureate 

22 Saturday 10 a.m. 
Commencement 

24 Monday 
Final grades due 




Tkble of 
Contents 



Bethany Profile 


5 


College Life 


13 


Admission 


25 


Expenses and Financial Aid 


29 


Academic Program 


39 


Course Descriptions 


51 


The Directories 


123 


Index 


131 



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Bethany 
Profile 

History 

Bethany was established as a private 
educational foundation, chartered 
under the laws of then undivided 
Commonwealth of Virginia on March 2, 
1840, more than two decades before 
West Virginia became a state. The 
charter was written by Alexander 
Campbell, a celebrated debater, 
Christian reformer, and educator, who 
not only provided land for the campus 
and $15,000 toward the first building, 
but also served as Bethany's first 
president until his death in 1866. 

Bethany's traditions are derived from 
the University of Glasgow in Scotland, 
where Campbell studied before coming 
to America in 1809, and from the 
University of Virginia, from which 
Campbell gleaned much of the College's 
original curriculum and faculty. 

Since its inception, Bethany has 
remained a four-year private college 
affiliated with the Christian Church 
(Disciples of Christ). This religious 
body, of which Campbell was one of the 
principal founders, continues to support 
and encourage Bethany, though it 
exercises no sectarian control. 




Location 



Bethany is located in the northern 
panhandle of West Virginia, a narrow 
tip of land between Ohio and 
Pennsylvania. This special location in 
the rolling foothills of the Allegheny 
Mountains puts Bethany near several 
large cities. To the northeast, just 50 
miles away, is the major urban and 
cultural center of Pittsburgh. Fifteen 
miles to the southwest is Wheeling, W. 
Va., the dominant northern city in the 
state and location of Oglebay Park, one 
of the nation's best-known summer and 
winter resorts. 



Accreditation and 
Memberships 

• North Central Association of 
Colleges and Secondary Schools 

• Association of American Colleges 

• American Council on Education 

• College Entrance Examination 
Board 

• American Association of Colleges for 
Teacher Education 

• National Council for the 
Accreditation of Teacher Education 

• National Association of Independent 
Colleges and Universities 

• Division of Higher Education of the 
Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) 

• Women graduates are eligible for 
membership in the American 
Association of University Women. 



Enrollment 



Each year Bethany students - 
approximately 500 men and 400 women 
- represent some 30 states and 20 
foreign countries. The majority come 
from Pennsylvania, New Jersey, New 
York, Ohio, Connecticut, Maryland, and 
West Virginia. Nearly 85 per cent of the 
student body is from out-of-state. 




Curriculum 



The Bethany Plan provides not only for 
a classroom-based program but for an 
experience-based program as well. It is 
a recognition that the classroom is not 
the only place for meaningful education. 

The Plan provides for a close student- 
faculty relationship. In consultation 
with a faculty advisor, the student is 
asked to design or to help plan an 
educational program to satisfy his or 
her personal goals. It encourages 
students to develop their own special 
course of study. Pages 39-49 discuss 
this curriculum in detail. 



Goals 



Bethany College is a private, four-year, 
church-related but autonomous, co- 
educational, residential, liberal arts 
college with a tradition of an innovative 
and quality educational program. 
Bethany emphasizes critical reason and 
the religious dimension of life, 
community experience and the 
importance of the individual, ethical 
responsibility and the satisfactions of 
personal accomplishments, the 
integration of the total person, and the 
value of a life of work and service to 
others. 

The educational program is designed to 
help each Bethany student realize seven 
goals: 

1) to discover how to acquire, evaluate, 
and use knowledge 

2) to master the skills of communication 

3) to cooperate and collaborate with 
others in study, analysis, and 
formulation of solutions to problems 

4) to understand contemporary issues 
and events 

5) to analyze personal values, to 
perceive and to deal sympathetically 
with the values of others, and to be 
open to the continued evaluation of both 

6) to make progress toward the 
selection of and the preparation for a 
vocation 

7) to integrate the varied experiences of 
life and to see the relationship of the 
college experience to future 
development as a responsible citizen. 



Educational 
Resources 

Substantial resources are invested in 
the education of Bethany students. The 
gross assets of the College on June 30, 
1980, totaled $33,265,383. Facilities and 
equipment at book value were 
$18,879,202, with a replacement value 
of approximately $45,000,000. The 
market value of all endowment funds 
was $12,535,081. 

More than 30 academic, administrative, 
and residential buildings are on 
Bethany's campus. 

Pendleton Heights (1841) was built 
during the college's first year by W. K. 
Pendleton, a member of the first faculty 
and second president of the College. 
Today it serves as home for Bethany's 
president. Pendleton Heights is listed in 
the "National Register of Historic 
Places." 

Old Main (1858) is the central unit of 
Bethany's academic buildings. Its tower 
dominates the campus and is the chief 
architectural feature noted as one 
approaches the College. Old Main is 
listed in the "National Register of 
Historic Places." The building is one of 
the earliest examples of collegiate 
Gothic architecture in the United 
States, and is in the process of 
restoration. 

Commencement Hall (1872) provides 
the setting for convocations, concerts, 
lectures, dramatic presentations, and 
other gatherings. Studios and 



classrooms for the art department 
occupy the ground floor of the building. 
It was remodeled in 1924. 

Cramblet Hall (1905) was constructed 
through a gift from Andrew Carnegie. 
Originally the library, it was remodeled 
in 1961 to house Bethany's 
administrative offices. It is named in 
honor of two presidents of the College, 
Thomas E. Cramblet and his son, 
Wilbur. 

Cochran Hall (1910) was built as a 
men's residence by Mark M. Cochran of 
the class of 1875. The interior of the 
building was completely remodeled 
during 1974-75 to serve as a faculty 
office and student conference center. 
Today it houses eight academic 
departments of the College and several 
administrative offices. 

Oglebay Hall (1912) a gift of Earl W. 
Oglebay of the class of 1869, 
accommodates the laboratories and 
classrooms for the biology and 
psychology departments. 

Irvin Gymnasium (1919) a gift of the 
Irvin family of Big Run, Pa., serves as a 
recreation center for the campus. It 
contains a modern dance studio. 

Renner Union-Bethany House (1948) is 
the student union. Here are found the 
campus radio station, the college 
bookstore, a student photographic 
darkroom, music listening rooms, a 
spacious lounge, and the Admission 
Office. The alumni joined in 1969 with 
the R. R. Renner family of Cleveland, 
Ohio, to remodel this facility. 



Alumni Field House (1948) provides 
physical education facilities for men and 
women. It is also used for concerts. 
Adjacent to the field house are football 
and baseball fields, tennis courts, and a 
quarter-mile track. 

Richardson Hall of Science (1964) 
provides facilities for the chemistry, 
physics, and mathematics departments 
and houses the computer center. It is 
named for Robert Richardson, 
Bethany's first science professor. 

John J. Knight Natatorium (1967) 
contains a six-lane, 25-yard, heated pool 
which is used in the physical education 
program and for intercollegiate 
competition. It is named for John J. 
Knight, long-time director of athletics. 
Four tennis courts are located next to 
the natatorium. 




David and Irene Steinman Fine Arts 
Center (1969) houses the education, 
music, and theatre departments. A 
fully-equipped theatre occupies the 
central portion of the building. The 
music department consists of teaching 
studios, studio-classrooms, a general 
rehearsal room for the larger choral 
and instrumental groups, and individual 
practice rooms. 

Leadership Center (1972) is the world's 
first solarized satellite receiving center 
and houses offices, seminar rooms, 
exhibition areas, and a 123-seat circular 
conference room for continuing 
education activities. The center offers a 
regular series of conferences, seminars, 
and workshops for education, business, 
and professional groups. It is a 
memorial to Thomas E. Millsop, former 
president and chairman of the National 
Steel Corporation. 

Gresham House (1972) is the Millsop 
Center's adjoining guest facility which 
provides 40 rooms for overnight 
accommodations for visitors to the 
College. It is named for Dr. Perry E. 
Gresham, Bethany's twelfth president, 
and his wife, Aleece. 

Harder Hall (1981) is the educational 
laboratory/ dining facility for Millsop 
Center. It adjoins Gresham House, the 
forty room overnight guest facility. It 
honors Delmar C. Harder, a pioneer in 
automation in the American auto 
industry. 



Benedum Commons (1969) is the 
modern, air-conditioned dining facility 
for all Bethany students. In addition to 
the main dining room, the building 
houses a snack bar, lounge facilities and 
several small dining rooms for special 
student and faculty events. 



Bethany 



1. Pendleton Heights 

2. Old Main 

3. Commencement Hall 

4. Oglebay Hall 

5. Steinman Fine Arts Center 
Wailes Theater 

6. Irvin Gymnasium 

7. Richardson Hall of Science 
Weimer Lecture Hall 

8. Phillips Memorial Library 

9. Morlan Hall 

10. Harlan Hall 

11. Phillips Hall 
Renner Too 
Maxwell's 

12. Cramblet Hall 

13. Cochran Hall 

14. Benedum Commons 

15. Bethany House-Renner Union 
Bookstore 
Admission Office 

16. Infirmary 

17. McEachern Hall 

18. McLean Hall 

19. Bethany Memorial Church 

20. Campbell Hall 

21. Buildings & Grounds 

22. Heating Plani 

23. Knight Natatorium 

24. Alumni Field House 

25. Rine Field 

26. Gresham House 

27. Leadership Center 

28. Highland Hearth 

29. Faculty Apartments 

30. Clark House (ata) 

31. Hagerman House (*kt) 

32. McDiarmid House (tib*) 

33. Goodnight House (saf.) 

34. Woolery House 

35. Zeta Tau Alpha 

36. Sigma Alpha Epsilon 

37. Alpha Xi Delta 

38. Independent House 

39. Kappa Delta 

40. Phi Mu 

41. Weimer Nature Trail 

42. Amphitheater 

43. Oglebay Gates 

44. Harder Hall 



8 





Residence Halls 

Harlan, Morlan, Phillips, and Campbell 
are the largest residence halls on the 
Bethany campus. Since 1966, Bethany 
has moved toward small, self-governing 
living units, each accommodating either 
32 or 48 students and containing social 
and recreational facilities. Phillips Hall, 
one of two freshmen women residences 
and the oldest residence hall (1890) on 
campus, was remodeled in early 1978. 
The ground floor now houses a large, 
multipurpose recreation room, Renner 
Too, Maxwell's Coffee House and 
kitchen facilities. In addition, all 
students' rooms have been redecorated 
and the heating system, fire safety and 
access for the handicapped have been 
improved. 

In the early 1970's, six 32-bed residence 
units were constructed on the wooded 
north slope of the campus. These units 
house fraternities, sororities, and 
independent men. 



Phillips Memorial 
Library 

The T W. Phillips Memorial Library, 
built in 1959, is a gift of the Phillips 
family of Butler, Pa., as a memorial to 
T W. Phillips, Sr. and T. W. Phillips, Jr., 
leading laymen of the Christian Church, 
trustees of the college, and generous 
philanthropists. 

Open 94 hours a week, the staff of 
librarians and clerks, assisted by more 
than 35 student assistants, is eager to 
help students and faculty find the 
information they need in the library's 
quality collections. 

The building contains nearly 143,000 
volumes of books and bound periodicals 
with additional collections of 
microforms, pamphlet files, selected 
government documents, and circulating 
art prints. The library's periodical 
holdings number 698, of which 587 are 
currently received. Local, area, 
national, and foreign newspapers arrive 
daily. 

The librarians and faculty select 
materials which provide students with 
the information needed to complete 
course assignments in the subject areas 
taught. Many alumni and friends of the 
College have given book collections and 
provided financial support that has 
enhanced the quality of the holdings. 

For advanced research and senior 
projects, the Library, through its 
membership in the Pittsburgh Regional 
Library Center and the OCLC 
nationwide computerized network, 
provides Bethany students and faculty 
with interlibrary loan access to the 
collections of more than 1,500 college, 
university, public, and special libraries. 
The library provides weekend van 
service to libraries in Pittsburgh. 

The Campbell Room contains books, 
periodicals, letters, paintings, 
photographs, and museum pieces 
related to Bethany's founder and first 
president, Alexander Campbell, his 
Bethany associates, and his family. The 



College archives collection spans the 
history of the institution from its 
beginnings to yesterday's events. Both 
collections are significant resources not 
only for the history of the College and 
religious movement that Campbell 
began here but also for regional and 
intellectual history of the nineteenth 
century. 

Media Center 

The Media Center, located in the 
library, provides such instructional 
media materials as slides, audio and 
video tapes, cassettes, video discs, 
films, filmstrips, and recordings. A full 
array of the latest media equipment is 
available for students and faculty to use 
these media materials or to create their 
own productions. 

A media laboratory in the center 
provides language learning consoles, 
calculators, cable television, stereo 
record players, and other self- 
instructional media learning modules. 

Faculty or students can check out 
media materials or equipment for 
instructional use. The center also has 
production facilities for slides, tapes, 
filmstrips, transparencies, dry 
mounting, laminating, and high speed 
tape duplication. 

Close coordination between the media 
center and other media-oriented units 
on campus, such as WVBC radio, TV-3 
television, biology auto-tutorial 
laboratory, and campus duplicating 
services, make it possible to meet any 
media need of the Bethany College 
community. 



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College Life 



At Bethany, education is a total 
experience of living and learning. The 
College community offers a myriad of 
activities from hang gliding to campus 
theatre productions. Students are 
encouraged to participate in those 
things that will best compliment their 
educational experience. 

Bethany assumes the mature and 
responsible citizenship of its students. 
The College believes this citizenship is 
best realized through the personal 
freedom of each individual, as well as 
the community building efforts of 
students, faculty and administrators. 
College officials intervene only when 
the rights and privileges of some are 
threatened by the actions of others. 

Through this community interaction, 
there is such a sense of ownership by 
both those who learn and those who 
teach that the term "Bethanian" has 
come to mean a special sense of pride. 

Student Government 

The Student Board of Governors, with 
representatives from all residence 
groups, manages a substantial budget 
and appropriates funds for many 
diverse student activities. 
Representatives are appointed to many 
faculty committees including those 
concerned with curricula, cultural 
programs, schedules, athletics, religious 
life, international education, and the 
library. In addition, the Student Board 
of Governors President participates in 
the biannual Board of Trustees meeting 
as a non-voting member. 




Residence halls form the primary 
political groups for self-government. 
Fraternities, sororities, and house 
associations accommodate all 
upperclassmen in small self-governed 
units. These students are responsible 
for their conduct; cultural, academic, 
and social programming, and care of 
the facilities. Shortly after arrival, 
freshmen also organize and send 
representatives to student government. 

Student 
Regulations 

A complete description of the 
regulations pertaining to housing, 
telephones, dining rooms, health 
services, motor vehicles, use of alcoholic 
beverages and drugs, eligibility 
requirements, and other areas of 
student life is contained in the Student 
Handbook. However, applicants for 
admission should know the following in 
advance: 

1) With the exception of commuters 
(i.e., married students or students living 
with parents) all students are required 
to live in College residence halls or 
fraternity or sorority houses unless 
excused by the Dean of Students. 



2) All students, except commuters, are 
required to board in the College dining 
hall unless excused by the Dean of 
Students. No refunds are granted for 
meals missed. 

3) Freshmen are not permitted to bring 
automobiles to Bethany unless the 
request is approved by the Dean of 
Students and the vehicle properly 
registered. 

4) Violations of regulations which are 
not adequately dealt with by the self- 
governing housing unit may be referred 
to the Dean of Students or to the 
Student Court. The Student Court is 
composed entirely of students and 
offers students the opportunity to be 
judged by their peers. 

Residence Life 

The majority of Bethany residences are 
small, self -governed living units, 
including 11 home-like, 32-bed or 48-bed 
houses on the wooded slopes opposite 
the main campus. In all, 21 housing 
units are available to students. 

Fraternities, sororities, and 
independent-house associations 
constitute the primary upperclass social 
groups on campus. Each association or 
fraternal group is responsible for 
arranging its cultural, recreational, and 
social experiences and for maintaining 
its own internal discipline. Houses are 
also responsible for organizing day-to- 
day housekeeping chores and for 
working closely with the College in 
developing a decor that suits the group 
living style. 



13 



Freshmen live in the larger residence 
halls, but are granted many of the same 
freedoms and responsibilities of the 
upperclassmen. Head residents and 
student resident assistants give a great 
deal of leadership and counsel the first 
semester, and by the second semester 
freshmen are involved in most decision- 
making. 

The seven fraternities and five 
sororities at Bethany are nationally 
affiliated and constitute approximately 
60 percent of the student body. 
Interfraternity Council and Panhellenic 
Council, composed of representatives 
from each of the fraternities and 
sororities, act as the coordinating 
agencies in fraternal affairs and 
activities. 

The fraternities represented are Alpha 
Sigma Phi, Beta Theta Pi, Delta Tau 



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restoration of thu rtrKiwi to 
its original condition. 



►WTf "" 



Delta, Kappa Alpha, Sigma Alpha 
Epsilon, Phi Kappa Tau, and Sigma Nu. 
The sororities are Alpha Xi Delta, 
Kappa Delta, Pi Beta Phi, Phi Mu, and 
Zeta Tau Alpha. 



Social Life 



Much of the social life at Bethany is 
casual. It may be a coffee date or 
Thursday Cabaret Night at the Barn or 
a mid-week sporting event. Any night 
of the week friends can be found 
studying together at the library or in a 
residence hall lounge. Athletics, 
theatre, movies, concerts, coffee-house 
programs, and parties fill many 
weekends. 

The student-run College Union 
Program Board brings numerous big- 
name concerts to campus. In recent 
years, the Lester Lanin Orchestra has 
played for Homecoming while other 
concerts were given by Gene Cotton, 
Jonathan Edwards, Michael Iceberg & 
The Iceberg Machine (electronic music 
workshop), Oak, The Iron City 
Houserockers, Chestnut Brass, The 
Gary Burton Quartet, Paul Skyland, 
The Toons, Dave Mason, The Roches, 
and others. 

Some of the other entertainers to 
appear at Maxwell's Coffee House were 
Lee Smedley, Andy Cohen, Joe Larose, 
Wendy Grossman, John Hutchison, 
Kurly Maple, Bill Steele, Bob Franke, 
Joe Hickerson, Larry Edelman and the 
Rural Valley Revellers, TJ and The 
Bandits, George Williams, Peter 
Bellamy, Jeff Cahill, Van Mertz, and 
others. 

Volunteers in 
Action 

Volunteers in Action is a student- 
initiated and student-run organization 
providing various community services 
by Bethany College students. At the 
same time, VIA gives Bethanians the 
opportunity for practical experience in 
some of the helping professions. Not 
only is it a means of fulfilling practicum 



requirements, but VIA offers on and off 
campus activities to help others along 
with helping the students themselves 
develop group skills and a sense of 
personal satisfaction. 

The different volunteer programs work 
with a diversity of ages and resources. 
These include experience with 
teenagers in a juvenile detention center; 
playing and tutoring with rural children 
in the Saturday School program; 
engaging in a one-to-one relationship 
with children and teens as a Big 
Brother or Big Sister. Other programs 
involve helping with the elderly of the 
Bethany community, visiting and 
working in a rehabilitation and 
extended-care hospital; and visiting 
with individuals at a nearby mental 
health center. 

As the largest student organization on 
campus, Volunteers in Action hopes to 
generate concern and compassion 
throughout the community while 
enhancing practical learning 
experience. 

Cultural Activities 

Speakers on campus within the past 
two years were LeRoy Neiman, sports 
artist; Roy Fox, KDKA-Radio; Jeremy 
Rifkin; Andrew Young; Thaddeus 
Walendowski, Polish dissident; Glenn 
Silber. Other recent speakers have been 
Richard Valeriani, C. Brooks Peters, 
Alex Haley, Mark Lane, Vincent 
Bugliosi, Geraldo Rivera and Mel Blanc. 

Cultural events included The Pocket 
Mime Theatre, the Dance Workshop of 



14 



Al Wiltz, the Actors Theatre of 
Louisville production of "In Fashion," 
and Mildred Miller, mezzo soprano. 

Numerous art and photographic shows, 
including the Bethany Fall and Spring 
Art Exhibitions, were displayed in 
Renner Union Lounge. Student and 
faculty shows were exhibited 
throughout the year. 

Besides the regular Friday and 
Saturday night schedule of first-run 
movies, numerous foreign and 
experimental art films were shown 
during the year. 



Music 



Theatre 



Drama is one of the most important co- 
curricular activities at Bethany. Nearly 
one-fourth of the last senior class 
participated in a production while at 
Bethany. Often acting, directing, 
playwriting, and producing are 
correlated with courses in the theatre 
department. Non-theatre majors have 
every opportunity to participate. 

Most of the productions are staged in 
Wailes Theatre of the Steinman Fine 
Arts Center. The theatre seats 300 
people and has a fully equipped 
workshop. Most plays are performed 
three or four times. 

Last year's productions included 
Hughie, The Zoo Story, Come Blow Your 
Horn, The Curse of the Starving Class, 
Vanities, Death Takes a Holiday 
(Dinner-Theatre), and Candide. 



There is a wide range of musical groups 
on campus in both the vocal and 
instrumental fields. 

The Concert Choir performs on campus 
and goes on tour each spring. The 
repertoire consists primarily of serious 
sacred and secular works of many 
periods. There is opportunity within the 
choir itself for the formation of smaller 
ensembles to cultivate special types of 
repertoire. 

The Madrigal Ensemble and Glee Club 
are select groups which sing a variety 
of types of works. These groups, and 
others in the community, form the 
Oratorio Chorus which annually 
presents a major concert during the 
Christmas season. 

The College Band performs at athletic 
contests and for special occasions 
throughout the year. Band members 
attend an instrumental seminar each 
fall before the opening of school. 

The Jazz Band, a select group of 
players, performs the big band 
repertoire. This group annually tours 
various high schools in West Virginia, 
Ohio and Pennsylvania. 

The Brass Choir appears at formal 
convocations and in concerts. It is open 
to qualified players by audition as 
vacancies occur. 

Chamber Music is provided by 
woodwind quintets, string quartets, and 
smaller ensembles that develop 
annually and are open to all who play 
orchestral instruments. 

There is opportunity for proficient 
orchestral musicians, especially string 
players, to play in the Wheeling 
Symphony. To be admitted into this 
orchestra one must audition with thp 
Symphony's director. 




Publications and 
Radio-TV 

Student-produced publications include a 
campus newspaper, The Tower; a 
yearbook, The Bethanian; a literary 
journal, The Harbinger; and a 
magazine, The Folio. This past year, the 
newspaper, the yearbook, the literary 
journal and the magazine won national 
awards for excellence. There is also a 
campus radio station, WVBC-FM, and a 
campus television station, TV3. 

All of these media are under the 
supervision of the Board of 
Communications which is chaired by the 
president of the Student Board of 
Governors. The board includes the 
student editors and business managers 
of all publications, the general manager 
and program director of the radio and 
television stations, and members of the 
faculty and administration. 



15 



Intercollegiate 
Athletics, 
Intramurals, and 
Recreation 

Bethany College is a member of 
Division III of the National Collegiate 
Athletic Association and the 
Association for Intercollegiate Athletics 
for Women. Men's intercollegiate sports 
include baseball, basketball, cross 
country, football, golf, lacrosse, soccer, 
swimming, tennis, and track. Bethany's 
men's teams compete in the Presidents' 
Athletic Conference which also includes 
the following colleges and universities: 
Allegheny, Carnegie-Mellon, Thiel, and 
Washington & Jefferson in western 
Pennsylvania; and Case-Western 
Reserve, Hiram, and John Carroll in 
Ohio. The women's athletic teams 
compete in the Pennwood West 
Conference in the following sports: 
basketball, field hockey, lacrosse, 
Softball, tennis, and volleyball. 
Membership in the section of the 
Pennwood West Conference in which 
Bethany participates includes: 
Carnegie-Mellon, Chatham, Carlow, 
Seton Hill, St. Francis, and Washington 
& Jefferson. 




16 



Recreation is provided for the entire 
student body through an extensive 
intramural and open recreation 
program. Men's intramural sports 
include basketball, bowling, cross 
country, football, golf, racketball, 
Softball, swimming, table tennis, tennis, 
track, volleyball, and wrestling. 
Women's intramural sports include 
bowling, basketball, cross country, 
softball, table tennis, football, 
swimming, tennis, track, and volleyball. 
The director of intramural athletics 
supervises the program. 

Bethany encourages students to 
develop skills in recreational activities 
that may be continued through life. In 
addition to the usual team sports, staff 
instruction is available in archery, 
badminton, horseback riding, 
swimming, golf, tennis, camping 
techniques, jogging, body mechanics, 
bowling, dancing, gymnastics, and 
aerobics. 

There are many opportunities available 
for students who wish to pursue 
recreational interests. The 1,600 acres 
of College land provide a natural 
setting for hiking and nature study. The 
Wilderness Club provides for camping, 
backpacking, and rafting. Ski slopes 



and riding stables are available at 
nearby Oglebay Park. The Dutch Fork 
Hunt Club invites students to go fox 
hunting from September through 
February. Local farmers are willing to 
board horses. Three public, 18-hole golf 
courses, including one of Robert Trent 
Jones design, are located within 10 
miles of campus. 

Student Health 
Services 

All students entering Bethany for the 
first time are required to submit a 
completed physical examination form 
before registration. After arrival, the 
College health service is maintained by 
student fees, and all students are 
entitled to infirmary privileges as in- 
patients and out-patients. A minimum 
charge for prescription medicines, 
ointments, or injections may be added 
to the student's account in the Business 
Office. 



The Bethany infirmary is on 24-hour 
call for illnesses and injuries which 
occur during the academic year. Medical 
service is not available at the infirmary 
during vacations and recess periods. 
Students who suffer serious illnesses 
and accidents are usually treated at the 
Wheeling Hospital, located 15 miles 
from the town of Bethany which 
maintains ambulance service for 
emergencies. 

The College physicians have regular 
office hours each weekday morning 
during the school year for free 
consultation. In case of an emergency 
operation, when the parents cannot be 
reached, the Dean of Students, upon 
the recommendation of the College 
physician, assumes the responsibility of 
giving permission for operations. 

Bethany provides medical, surgical, and 
hospitalization insurance. All students 
are automatically included in the 
coverage from September 1 to August 
31 and are charged accordingly unless 
the appropriate waiver is forwarded to 
the Business Office. Expenses for 
outside consultation and treatment are 
the responsibility of the student in all 
cases when not covered by insurance. 




Religious Life 

A variety of religious backgrounds is 
represented in the student body and 
faculty. While participation in religious 
concerns is entirely voluntary, there are 
substantial opportunities for religious 
exploration and participation on 
campus. 

Many students find in Bethany 
Memorial Church an opportunity for 
expression of their religious faith. The 
minister of this church, who is also the 
College chaplain, is available to 
students for counseling and advice on 
personal and religious matters. 

The Bishop of Wheeling-Steubenville 
Diocese of the Roman Catholic Church 
provides a chaplain for Catholic 
students. He is available on a weekly 
schedule for counseling, in addition to 
the celebration of Mass each Sunday 
and on Holy days. 

The Jewish fellowship meets for 
worship and study. Jewish 
congregations in Steubenville and 
Wheeling sponsor the fellowship and 
entertain Jewish students for the high 
holidays. 



Placement 



The Placement Office assists and 
advises underclass students, graduating 
seniors and alumni in planning careers 
and in obtaining temporary and/or 
permanent jobs. The office maintains a 
campus interview schedule, a career 
library and resource center consisting 
of career-planning literature, job 
announcements and graduate and 
professional school information. Free 
credential service is available to those 
who register by completing the 
necessary forms. In addition to 
providing counsel for resume 
preparation, interview techniques and 
job procedures, the placement director 
is a member of the Career Advisement 
Committee of the faculty. Bethany also 
has established a reciprocal agreement 
with four area colleges to offer students 
an opportunity to schedule personal 
interviews with representatives of firms 
visiting those campuses. 



Advising and 
Counseling 

Bethany recognizes the need to provide 
its entering students with an 
introduction to their work in new 
surroundings and therefore requires 
freshmen to come to the campus several 
days before the formal registration of 
other students. The orientation period 
is planned not only to introduce the 
students to the College but also to 
introduce the College to the students. 

From the beginning of their collegiate 
career, students are assigned a faculty 
advisor. Through the Bethany Plan 
curriculum, freshmen advisors come 
into weekly seminar contact with their 
advisees. Thus, they have ample 
opportunity to observe student 
strengths and weaknesses in academic 
situations as well as in more relaxed 
and informal counseling situations. 

After students choose a major field of 
concentration, they are then assigned to 
a faculty advisor in their chosen 
department. This advisor helps the 
student plan an academic program 
consistent with the aims and 
requirements of the department in a 
liberal arts education, and a program 
which is in keeping with the student's 
abilities and aspirations. 

The chief officer in charge of student 
advising and counseling, student 
welfare, and coordination of all student 
personnel administration is the Dean of 
Students. Members of his staff are 
available for help in all major areas of 
guidance, including post graduate and 
career planning. 



17 



Advisors 

For Freshmen 

Lynn Adkins 
William B. Allen 
James E. Allison 
Albert R. Buckelew Jr. 
Leonora Balla Cayard 
James E. Dafler 
John U. Davis 
J. Daniel Draper 
Kurt P. Dudt 



Larry E. Grimes 
David M. Hutter 
John W. Lozier 
Joseph McGraw 
J. Trevor Peirce 
John R. Taylor 
T. Gale Thompson 
Burton B. Thurston 



For Fields of Concentration 



Art 

Biology 

Chemistry 

Communications 

Computer Science 

Economics and Business 

Education 

English 

Fine Arts 

Foreign Languages 

Health Science 

History and Political 

Science 
Interdisciplinary Studies 
Mathematics 
Music 
Philosophy 
Physical Education 
Physics 
Psychology 
Religious Studies 
Sociology and Social Work 
Theatre 



Walter L. Kornowski 

Gary E. Larson 

J. Daniel Draper 

James J. Humes 

James E.Allison 

William C. Pavord 

Ann C. Shelly 

Larry E.Grimes 

John R. Taylor 

Leonora Balla Cayard 

Gary E . Larson 



William L.Young 

Larry E.Grimes 

James E.Allison 

William P. Crosbie 

Robert E.Myers 

David M. Hutter 

Edwin Goldin 

J. Trevor Peirce 

Richard B. Kenney 

Lynn Adkins 

David J. Judy 




For Career Interests 



Dentistry 

Drama 

Engineering 

Law 

Medicine J.Daniel 

Ministry 

Radio 

Recreation Leadersh 

Social Work 

Teaching 

Television 

Veterinary Medicine 



J. Daniel Draper 

David J. Judy 

Edwin Goldin 

William L. Young 

Draper, Gary E . Larson 

Richard B. Kenney 

James J. Humes 

ip David M. Hutter 

Lynn Adkins 

Ann C. Shelly 

Kurt P. Dudt 

Gary E. Larson 



For Special Services 

Campus Employment John Cunningham 

Counseling 

Foreign Students 



Graduate Fellowships 

and Scholarships 
Ministerial Training 

Awards 
Social Security and 

Veterans Benefits 
Social and 

Recreational 

Activities 
Testing 



John Cunningham 
Gary E.Larson, 
John Cunningham 



Robert E.Myers 

Robert A. Sandercox 

Joseph M. Kurey 



Darline B. Nicholson 
John Cunningham 
Undergraduate Scholarships 

Theodore W. Bunnell, Beth Dameier 
Vocational Information 
and Guidance John Cunningham 



Pre-Professional 
Study 

Professional Core 
Program 

In order to assist students toward 
professional careers, Bethany offers 
four "Professional Core Programs" 
in Management, Public Affairs (Public 
Policy/Administration), Communication 
(Marketing or Electronic Media), and 
Science and Technology (Computing or 
Pre-professional Science). 

These distinctive curricular options are 
generally interdisciplinary and are 
chosen as electives, supplementing the 
student's major field of concentration. 
For instance, a student majoring in Art 
or Music may elect to complete a core in 
Management, or a Biology or 
Chemistry major may choose a core in 
Communication with an Electronic 
Media emphasis. The aim of the 
program, then, is to broaden the 
student's career options as well as to 
extend the academic experience of the 
student. The program may also be 
viewed as preparation for graduate or 
professional school in an area outside 
the student's regular field of 
concentration. 

Fulfillment of the requirements for a 
core will be noted on the student's 
transcript. Specific details of these 
requirements may be secured in the 
Office of Professional and Career 
Development. Students interested in 
pursuing a Professional Core Program 
should see their faculty advisors at an 
early point in their course planning. 



18 



Pre-Medical and 
Health Professions 

Students desiring to prepare for the 
study of medicine, dentistry, or any of 
the health related fields will find 
instruction and facilities at Bethany 
which satisfy the entrance requirements 
for the best professional schools. 

The Medical College Admissions Test or 
the Dental Admissions Test, covering 
medical or dental school entrance 
requirements in chemistry, biology, and 
physics as well as the social sciences 
and humanities, must be taken in the 
junior year. A program furnishing the 
proper sequence of courses to prepare 
students to take either of these tests 
requires that both beginning chemistry 
and biology be taken in the first 
semester of the freshman year. 

Bethany also provides a degree 
program for certified allied health 
professionals who have completed 
accredited technical programs at other 
institutions. For details of this Health 
Science degree, see page 88. 

The Career Advisement Committee of 
the faculty disseminates information on 
the professional programs and entrance 
requirements in the various health 
related areas as well as writes letters of 
reference and helps students gain some 
experience in the matters of interviews. 

Pre-Law 

Most law schools do not require specific 
undergraduate courses for entrance. 
Rather they expect the broadest 
possible educational background. They 
do, however, recommend that the 
prospective law student acquire skills in 
three basic areas: 1) effectiveness in the 
comprehension and expression of the 
English language, 2) insight into the 
understanding of human institutions 



and values, 3) creative power in 
thinking. Courses in English 
composition and literature, history, 
ethics, logic, economics, political 
science, sociology, and accounting are 
particularly useful in acquiring these 
skills. 

Pre-E ngineering 

Training in the sciences and humanities 
provides a good foundation for pre- 
engineering students, some of whom 
desire to transfer to an engineering 
school after carefully following the 
requirements of the engineering school 
they wish to enter. 

By cooperative arrangement with 
Case Western Reserve University, 
Columbia University, Georgia Institute 
of Technology, and Washington 
University, Bethany offers the first 
three years of a five-year course and 
arranges for the qualified student to 
transfer to one of these engineering 
schools for the last two years of 
undergraduate training. Upon 
completion of the five-year program, 
degrees from both institutions are 
granted. For more information about 
these programs, see page 44. 

Professional Chemistry 

A thorough preparation for professional 
chemistry and a background in the 
liberal arts at Bethany conforms to 
American Chemical Society standards. 
Independent study introduces the 
student to the principles of research 
which aids in any contemplated 
graduate or industrial work following 
graduation. 

Business Administration 

Registration for entry into schools of 
business and careers in business and 
industry is provided both 
departmentally and 
interdepartmentally. The traditional 
field of concentration in Economics and 
Business is the typical approach, but 
many students elect to concentrate in 
Mathematics, with its "track" in 
Economics, or in Communications, with 
an emphasis in advertising and public 
relations. In addition, some choose 
other fields as their major area and 



carefully select their electives among 
business-related courses. Graduate 
schools of business generally expect 
students to have a background in basic 
economic theory, the principles of 
accounting, and mathematics. 

Pre-Theological 

Students who plan to enter church 
vocations are expected to complete 
their preparation in seminaries and 
-graduate schools of religion after 
graduating from Bethany. Their 
undergraduate studies, therefore, are 
primarily liberal arts. Students elect 
courses which provide necessary 
pre-seminary studies in the natural and 
social sciences, the arts and humanities, 
and religion. 

Social Work Education 

Students may qualify for entry-level 
positions in the social work profession 
by completing an undergraduate major 
in Bethany's social work program. The 
liberal arts emphasis of The Bethany 
Plan provides a rich setting for career 
preparation in this essentially humane 
profession. The undergraduate social 
work program is also solid preparation 
for graduate work in the field. 
Although it is desirable to enter the 
program as early as possible, course 
requirements can be met during the 
student's junior and senior years. For 
further information, see the head of the 
Sociology and Social Work Department. 

Teacher Education 

The preparation of teachers for the 
secondary and elementary schools is 
one of the major professional 
preparation programs at the college. 
Requirements for certification may be 
found in the course listings for the 
individual academic departments. 
Students wishing to prepare for a 
career in teaching should contact the 
head of the Education Department for 
further information in the freshman 
year or as soon as the decision is made. 



19 



Achievement 
Recognition 

Bethany encourages achievement in 
scholarship and leadership in student 
affairs by public recognition at 
Commencement, Honors Day, 
Founder's Day, and on other suitable 
occasions. 

Graduation Honors 

Students who have done academic work 
of unusual merit are graduated with 
honors: Summa Cum Laude (3.85), 
Magna Cum Laude (3.65), or Cum 
Laude (3.35). The awarding of honors is 
determined upon the basis of total 
quality points earned, standing in the 
Senior Comprehensive Examination, 
and the recommendation of the 
student's advisor. 

Students who do unusually well on the 
Senior Comprehensive Examination are 
listed at graduation as having "passed 
with distinction." 

Dean's List 

At the end of each semester, students 
who have rated high academically 
(grade point average of 3.65 or better) 
are designated as "Students 
Distinguished in Scholarship." Often 
called the Dean's List, this distinction is 
determined by the Honors Committee. 

Senior Fellowships 

Certain members of the junior class 
may be designated as senior fellows for 
the following year. The selection is 
made from students who have 
demonstrated unusual excellence in 
their field of concentration and who, by 
character and ability, can do special 
work in a department or area as an 
assistant in instruction or research. 



20 



Usually no more than 12 full-year senior 
fellowships and one senior fellowship 
at-large (or the equivalents) are 
awarded in any one year. Usually no 
more than one full-year appointment (or 
the equivalent) will be made in any one 
department or area. Although the title 
of senior-fellow-at-large is provided 
primarily for capable students involved 
in interdisciplinary programs, students 
in other fields of concentration may be 
nominated for this category. 

The selection of senior fellows is made 
by the Honors Committee from 
nominations usually presented by 
department heads. 

Honor Societies 

A number of honor societies have been 
established at Bethany through the 
years to recognize academic 
achievement and campus leadership. 

Gamma Sigma Kappa is a scholastic 
society founded at Bethany in 1932. 
Students who have achieved a 
cumulative scholarship index of at least 
3.70 (over at least four consecutive 
semesters and provided that in no 
semester their scholastic index falls 
below a 3.00) may, upon 
recommendation of the Honors 
Committee, be considered for 
membership. Usually, however, not 
more than 10 per cent of any class will 
be recommended. 

Bethany Kalon is a junior and senior 
society established in 1948 to give 
recognition to students of high 
character who have demonstrated 
competent and unselfish leadership in 
student activities and have been 
constructive citizens of the college 
community. Selection is made by the 
members of the society with the advice 
and approval of the Honors Committee. 

Alpha Phi Chapter of Beta Beta Beta 

is for students of the biological sciences. 
Its purpose is to stimulate sound 
scholarship, to promote the 
dissemination of scientific truth, and to 
encourage investigation into the life 
sciences. 



Gamma Upsilon Chapter of Lambda 
Iota Tau. Lambda Iota Tau is an 
international honor society for the 
encouragement and reward of 
scholastic excellence in the study of 
literature. Membership is limited to 
juniors and seniors who have a 
cumulative scholarship index of 3.0, 
who have completed a minimum of 12 
semester hours of literature courses 
with at least a 3.0 grade-point average 
in them and in all prerequisite courses, 
and who have presented a scholarly, 
critical, or creative paper which has 
been accepted by the chapter. Lambda 
Iota Tau is a member of the Association 
of College Honor Societies. 

Alpha Chapter of Omicron Delta 
Epsilon, an international honor society 
in economics, was established in 1960 to 
recognize excellence in the study of 
economics. Membership is limited to 
students who have completed a 
minimum of 16 semester hours of 
economics, including either Economics 
301 or 302, and who have achieved both 
a departmental and overall grade-point 
average of 3.25 or better. 

Beta Gamma Chapter of Alpha Psi 
Omega. Alpha Psi Omega is a national 
recognition society in dramatics. 
Students qualify by faithful work in 
playing major and minor roles or 
working with technical or business 
aspects of theatre. 

Mu Epsilon Chapter of Phi Alpha 
Theta was established at Bethany in 
1967 to recognize excellence in the 
study of history. Its membership is 
limited to those students who have 
completed at least 12 hours of history 
with a grade-point average of 3.0 or 
better and with at least a 3.0 grade- 
point average in two-thirds of all other 
studies. Members must also rank in the 
upper 35 per cent of their class. 




Awards 



Bethany Chapter of the Society for 
Collegiate Journalists, a national 
recognition society in journalism, is 
designed to stimulate interest in 
journalism, foster the mutual welfare of 
student publications, and reward 
journalists for their efforts, service, and 
accomplishments. 

Kappa XI Chapter of Sigma Delta Pi 

is an honor society for those who attain 
excellence in the study of the Spanish 
language and the literature and culture 
of the Spanish peoples. Students who 
are at least second semester 
sophomores and have a high scholastic 
index and who have completed at least 
one advanced course in Spanish 
literature are eligible for membership. 

Epsilon Chi Chapter of Kappa Pi is for 

students of graphic arts. Its purpose is 
to uphold the highest ideals of a liberal 
education, to provide a means whereby 
students with artistic commitment meet 



for the purpose of informal study and 
entertainment, to raise the standards of 
productive artistic work, and to furnish 
the highest reward for conscientious 
effort in furthering the best interest in 
art in the broadest sense of the term. 

Alpha Chapter of Kappa Mu Epsilon, 

a national honor society in 
mathematics, was established in 1975 to 
recognize outstanding achievement in 
mathematics. Its membership is limited 
to those students who have completed 
at least three semesters at Bethany, 
rank in the upper 35 per cent of their 
class, have completed at least three 
mathematics courses, including one 
semester of calculus, and have a grade- 
point average of 3.0 or better in all 
mathematics courses. 

Phi Delta Psi is a physical education 
honorary for both men and women 
which encourages scholarship, 
leadership, fellowship, high educational 
standards and participation in 
departmental activities. To be eligible, 
students must be at the second 
semester level of the sophomore year 
and achieve a grade point average of at 
least 3.0. 



Oreon E. Scott Award is presented to 
the graduating senior who has achieved 
the highest academic record over a 
four-year period of study. The donor of 
this award was a long-time Bethany 
trustee and a graduate of the class of 
1892. 

Anna Ruth Bourne Award stimulates 
scholarship among the women's social 
groups. A silver cup, provided by an 
anonymous donor in honor of the 
former distinguished head of the 
English department, is awarded to the 
recognized women's group whose active 
membership earns the highest 
scholarship standing each semester. The 
group winning the cup for four 
semesters is presented with a smaller 
replica as a permanent trophy. 

W. Kirk Woolery Award encourages 
scholarship among the men's social 
groups. A silver cup, donated by friends 
of the late Dr. Woolery, a former Dean 
and Provost of the College, is held by 
the recognized men's social group or 
housing organization whose 
membership (active membership only in 
the case of fraternities) earns the 
highest scholarship standing each 
semester. Any group winning the cup 
for four semesters is presented with a 
smaller replica as a permanent trophy. 

The Beta Beta Beta - B. R. Weimer 
Award, established in honor of the late 
Bernal R. Weimer, Professor of Biology 
and Dean of the Faculty, is given each 
year to the senior in biology who has 
attained the highest academic rank in 
this field of concentration. 



21 



The Beta Beta Beta Prize is awarded 
the student who has received the 
highest grades in the initial courses in 
biology. 

Florence Hoagland Memorial Award, 

given by a graduate of the class of 1944, 
is presented to the outstanding senior 
English major. The award honors the 
memory of the late Miss Hoagland who 
was for many years Professor of 
English at Bethany. 

Christine Burleson Memorial Award, 

given by a graduate of the class of 1936, 
is presented to a senior English major 
who has attained excellence in this field 
of concentration. The award honors the 
memory of the late Miss Burleson who 
was Professor of English and Dean of 
Women from 1932 to 1936. 

Cammie Pendleton Awards, named in 
honor of Miss A. Campbellina 
Pendleton, Professor of Language and 
Literature at Bethany from 1884 to 
1909, are presented to the outstanding 
junior and sophomore concentrating in 
English. The awards are given by 
Dwight B. MacCormack, Jr., of the 
class of 1956, in memory of his 
grandmother, Dr. T. Marion 
MacCormack. 

E. E. Roberts Distinguished Prize in 
Campus Journalism is awarded to an 
outstanding student who excels in work 
on a student publication, in academic 
work in the Communications 
department, or both. 

Winfred E. Garrison Prize is 

presented in recognition of outstanding 
achievement in one or more areas of 
philosophy. The award honors the 
memory of the late Dr. Winfred E. 
Garrison, graduate of the class of 1892, 
whose humane concerns and scholarly 
achievements contributed significantly 
to the area of higher education, history, 
and philosophy. 



22 



Outstanding Junior Woman Award is 

provided by the Pittsburgh Bethany 
College Club, comprising the Bethany 
alumnae of Pittsburgh. This award is 
based on qualities of leadership, 
character, conduct, and scholarship. 
The club has placed a suitable plaque in 
Phillips Hall on which names of the 
winners are engraved. In addition, an 
individual gift is made to the recipient. 

Vira I. Heinz Award is granted to the 
junior woman who has distinguished 
herself by leadership, character, 
conduct, and scholarship and whose 
proposal for foreign travel most 
significantly supplements her 
educational objectives. This award for 
summer travel is provided by the fund 
of Vira I. Heinz, recipient of the 
honorary Doctor of Religious Education 
degree from Bethany in 1969. 

Benjamin Chandler Shaw Travel 
Award is granted to the junior man 
who has distinguished himself by 
leadership, character, conduct and 
scholarship and whose proposal for 
foreign travel most significantly 
supplements his educational objectives. 
This award is funded by an anonymous 
friend of the college in recognition of 
Dr. Shaw, Bethany's George T Oliver 
Distinguished Professor of History and 
Political Science Emeritus. Dr. Shaw 
joined the Bethany faculty in 1935, 
served from 1945 to 1966 as head of the 
Department of History and Political 
Science and continued part-time until 
1973. 

W. F. Kennedy Prize is given to the 
outstanding young man in the junior 
class. This award, established by W. F. 
Kennedy of Wheeling, West Virginia, is 
awarded on the basis of the student's 
contribution to the college community 
life through leadership in activities, in 
personal character, and scholarship. 

Pearl Mahaffey Prize is awarded to 
the outstanding senior major in 
Languages. The award was established 
by Mrs. Walter M. Haushalter and 
other former students of Bethany's 
emeritus professor of foreign 
languages. The prize honors Miss 



Mahaffey, a faculty member from 
1908-1949 and a trustee of the College 
at the time of her death in 1971. 

Shirley Morris Memorial Award was 

established by Theta Chapter of Zeta 
Tau Alpha in memory of Shirley Morris, 
a loyal member and past president of 
the chapter. It is given to the 
outstanding student in the field of 
modern languages. Selection is made by 
the Department of Foreign Languages. 

Margaret R. Woods Prize, sponsored 
by the Kappa Xi Chapter of Sigma 
Delta Pi, is awarded to the outstanding 
Spanish major. The prize honors Miss 
Woods who was a faculty member from 
1943 until her retirement in 1965. 
Selection is made by the Department of 
Foreign Languages. 

Auguste Comte Award is presented to 
the senior of the Sociology Department 
for outstanding scholarship and keen 
interest in the field. The award is 
named after the founding father of the 
discipline. 

Charles H. Manion Award is made to 
the outstanding senior art major. The 
award memorializes Charles H. Manion, 
long-time trustee of Bethany College 
who was associated with the steel 
industry in the Ohio Valley and who 
enjoyed painting. The prize is provided 
by his daughter, Mrs. Leonard Yurko, 
Weirton. 

Theodore R. Kimpton Prize is 

awarded to the outstanding senior 
French major. This prize, which is 
restricted to those students whose 
native language is other than French, 
was established by Theodore R. 
Kimpton, assistant professor of foreign 
languages at Bethany prior to his 
retirement from full-time teaching in 
1975. 



J. S. V. Allen Memorial is a fund 
established by the family and friends of 
Professor Allen to provide for an 
annual award to the outstanding 
physics student. 

Frank Alfred Chapman Memorial is a 

fund established by Dr. Stanton 
Crawford to provide for an annual 
award to the outstanding history 
student. Preference is given to students 
of American history and the Ohio 
Valley. 

Osborne Booth Prize is given to the 
student who excels in the field of 
religious studies and in the overall 
academic program. The late Osborne 
Booth was T. W. Phillips Professor of 
Old Testament when he retired in 1964 
after 35 years of teaching at Bethany. 

Francis O. Carfer Prize is given to the 
senior who, in the judgment of the 
Honors Committee, has made the most 
outstanding contribution to the College. 
Mr. Carfer, a trustee of Bethany 
College for 29 years, was a graduate of 
the class of 1909. Recipients of the 
award must display sound academic 
accomplishments and characteristics of 
loyalty, service, and devotion to 
Bethany. 

W. H. Cramblet Prize recognizes 
outstanding achievement in 
mathematics. It is named in honor of 
Wilbur H. Cramblet, the eleventh 
president of Bethany College. 

John J. Knight Award is presented to 
the senior male Physical Education 
major displaying outstanding 
scholarship and athletic participation 
during his four years at Bethany. 

S. Elizabeth Reed Award is presented 
to the senior woman showing 
outstanding scholarship and athletic 
participation during her four years at 
Bethany. 



A. Kenneth Stevenson Theatre Award 

is presented each year to the 
outstanding Bethany junior or senior of 
any discipline with a grade point 
average above 3.2 who has contributed 
the most significantly to Bethany 
College Theatre activity. The award 
also provides for guest artists to 
enhance the program in Theatre. 
A. Kenneth Stevenson of Washington, 
Pa., was a long-time supporter of the 
Bethany College Theatre program until 
his death in 1979. Mrs. A. Kenneth 
Stevenson, her sons, Drew and Mark, 
both graduates of Bethany, and 
members of the Department of Theatre 
make the yearly selections. 

Forrest H. Kirkpatrick Award is 

presented annually to the outstanding 
senior concentrating in economics and 
business. The award is named in honor 
of Dr. Kirkpatrick, long-time dean of 
the College who is currently serving as 
adjunct professor of economics. 

The Rush Carter Prize in music is 
presented to a member of the senior 
class in recognition of outstanding 
achievement in music. The prize honors 
the memory of the late Professor 
Carter who was a member of the 
Bethany faculty from 1934 to 1945. 

The Edna W. Woolery Bibliography 
Prize is awarded to a senior student 
and to a freshman student who have 
individually compiled a bibliography and 
who request that it be considered for 
receiving the award. Edna W. Woolery 
was a Librarian at Bethany during the 
1950s. In the event that the Award, 
established in 1981, is not granted in 
any year, the funds are used to 
purchase Library books. Additional 
information is available from the 
Librarian. 

Wall Street Journal Award is given to 
the student majoring in Economics who 
has the highest average in select 
department courses and has shown 
strong participation in departmental 
activities. 

Senior Chemistry Award, given by an 
anonymous donor, is granted to the 
senior concentrating in chemistry who 



has achieved the highest cumulative 
average in the department, including 
the record made on the Senior 
Comprehensive Examination. 

Psychology Society Award is 

presented to the senior major in 
psychology who has maintained the 
highest academic average in the 
department. 

Society for Collegiate Journalists 
Award of Merit is presented to an 
upperclass writer or editor for 
significant contributions to campus 
student publications. 

WVBC-FM Senior Award is given to 
the senior who for four years has lent 
qualities of dedication, loyalty, 
leadership, talent, and creativity to 
WVBC's operations. 

WVBC-FM Talent Award is presented 
to the member of the WVBC staff who 
has offered the most outstanding 
continuous radio programming during 
the year. 

Freshman Writing Prizes, provided by 
alumni and awarded by the Department 
of English, are given annually to 
authors of the best essays written in 
Freshman Seminars. Each seminar 
leader submits the two best essays from 
the group and the winning essays 
are determined by a panel of judges. 

Research Awards 

The Gans Fund Awards are presented 
to juniors, seniors and graduates of the 
College who are engaged in approved 
study and research in some specific 
field at Bethany or elsewhere. The 
awards were established by Wickliffe 
Campbell Gans of the Class of 1870 and 
Emmett W. Gans in memory of their 
father and mother, Daniel L. and 
Margaret Gordon Gans. 



23 



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Admission 



Bethany accepts applications for 
admission from qualified candidates. 
Admission is based on a careful review 
of all credentials presented by the 
candidate. The Committee on 
Admission accepts candidates it 
considers best qualified among those 
applying. In no case does the meeting of 
minimum standards assure admission 
and acceptance is contingent upon a 
candidate's successful completion of 
secondary school. 

Bethany's admission policy enables the 
Committee on Admission to act on 
completed applications as they are 
received. Applicants will be notified of 
the Committee's decision approximately 
three weeks after all credentials have 
been received. Early application is 
advised. 

The College seeks students who have 
prepared themselves for a liberal arts 
curriculum by taking at least 15 units of 
college-preparatory work. Although the 
College does not prescribe how these 
units should be distributed, it expects a 
minimum of four years of English and 
the usual sequences in mathematics, 
science, foreign languages, and social 
studies. For students who have 
developed individual curricula or are 
involved in experimental honors 
programs, the Committee on Admission 
makes special evaluation. 





sf v <* 



* . 





The application process includes 
furnishing a transcript of completed 
work, a personal file, two references, 
and either the College Entrance 
Examination Board Scholastic Aptitude 
Test (SAT) scores or the American 
College Testing Program (ACT) scores. 
Supporting documents that might be of 
help in the process of admission, i.e., 
poetry, plays, short stories, music, 
artwork, photography, and journalistic 
writings, may also be submitted. 

Although not required, an on-campus 
interview with an admission officer is 
highly recommended. A campus visit 
will enable a student to develop some 
sensitivities about Bethany's lifestyle. A 
comprehensive tour, observation of 
classes, and interaction with Bethany 
students and faculty are available upon 
request. 



Prospective students are also invited to 
remain overnight as the guest of a 
Bethany student. Meals and overnight 
accommodations in college housing for 
prospective students are courtesy of the 
College. Lodging for parents is 
available at Gresham House, as well as 
nearby lodges, motels, and hotels. 
Transportation arrangements from the 
Greater Pittsburgh International 
Airport are easily made through the 
Admission Office. 



25 








** 











The Admission Office is open Monday 
through Friday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. 
and Saturday 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. 
throughout the year. Appointments 
may be made by calling 304-829-7611 or 
writing the Admission Office, Bethany 
College, Bethany, West Virginia 26032. 
A brochure will be sent, detailing travel 
routes and comfortable overnight 
accommodations. 



Transfers 



Transfer students are welcome. 
Procedures for transferring to Bethany 
are similar to those for freshmen. 
Any student in good standing at a fully 
accredited institution of higher 
education is eligible for acceptance. A 
majority of students accepted as 
transfers have above average grades 
and are seeking a campus life unlike 
that which they have experienced. 

Grades of "C" or better are accepted 
along with course work in which credit 
(on a credit/no credit basis) or pass (in a 
pass/fail system) has been received. If 
requested, course work from other 
institutions will be reviewed by 
Bethany's registrar prior to making 
application. 



Community/Junior 
College Graduates 

Students who have received or will 
receive an Associate in Arts or 
Associate in Science Degree and find 
Bethany's curriculum suited to their 
educational goals are encouraged to 
apply. 

Holders of the A.A./A.S. Degree who 
are accepted receive at least two years 
(minimum of 60 hours) credit, enter as 
juniors, and receive all the rights and 
privileges of upperclass students. 

Foreign Students 

Bethany is eager to review applications 
of students from other countries. 
Approximately 16 foreign countries are 
represented on campus each year. 

Students from non-English-speaking 
countries are required to submit, along 
with an application for admission, a 
complete secondary school transcript, 
the results of either the American 
College Testing Program (ACT) or the 
College Entrance Examination Board 
Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) and the 
Test of English as a Foreign Language 
(TOEFL), and at least two letters of 
recommendation. Applicants for the 
Fall Semester must submit the above 
stated materials by February 1. 

Foreign students are also requested to 
complete a Foreign Student's Financial 
Aid Application and Declaration. This 
form is to be returned with admission 
materials by the deadlines mentioned. 
Although Bethany is willing to review 
requests for financial assistance, funds 
are limited. 

Early Admission 

Some students complete their 
secondary school graduation 
requirements a year early and decide to 
pursue college admission after their 
junior year. For those who have 
demonstrated maturity and show 
evidence of a strong academic 



background, Bethany offers a program 
for early admission. For this type of 
admission, the usual admission 
procedures must be followed. A 
personal interview on campus as well as 
a discussion between the student's 
college counselor and a Bethany 
admission officer are required. 

Advanced 
Placement 

Students may receive advanced 
placement and/or credit from any 
department in the College through a 
testing program and must be 
accomplished before the end of the first 
year at Bethany College. Those who 
wish to receive credit by examination 
should consult with the coordinator of 
counseling services and the appropriate 
department head. 

Credit may be received or courses 
waived as a result of high scores on the 
College Entrance Examination Board 
Testing Program for Advanced 
Placement. The waiving of courses or 
granting of credit, however, are 
departmental matters and require 
consultation with the appropriate 
department head upon matriculation. 



27 



Expenses 
and 

Financial 
Aid 



Bethany College is a non-profit 
institution. Tuition, fees, and other 
general charges paid by the student 
cover less than three-fourths of the 
College's instructional and operational 
expenses. The remainder comes from 
income from endowment funds and 
from gifts and contributions. Bethany 
continues to keep the costs required 
from the student as low as possible. 

Comprehensive 
Charges 

Comprehensive charges of 
approximately $7,080 for a year at 
Bethany include the following: 

Tuition and Fees $5,025 

Room $675 

Board $1,105 

Student Board of Governors $115 

Bethany House-Benedum Commons $55 
Health Insurance $105 



While a general charge is stated for 
Tuition and Fees, this fee may be 
divided into $4,525 for tuition and $500 
for the following activities and services: 
athletics, health service, library, 
lectures, plays, concerts, publications, 
student activities, and laboratory 
services with the exception of music 
and art. 

The Bethany House-Benedum 
Commons Fee is charged to all 
registered students and covers the 
operation and maintenance costs of the 
student union. 

No reduction is made in student 
accounts for course changes made after 
the first two weeks of the semester. The 
College is required to collect a three per 
cent West Virginia sales tax on 
published charges for room and parking 
permits. Bethany reserves the right to 
change, without advance notice, the 
price for room, board and health 
insurance. 

Withdrawals and 



Refunds 



After registration, there is no refund of 
room charges or fees. A student 
voluntarily withdrawing or 
withdrawing because of illness during 
the course of the semester will be 
charged 10 per cent of tuition charges 
for each week of attendance or part 
thereof. There is no refund of tuition 
after the tenth week of attendance. 
There is no refund in the event that a 
student is dismissed or asked to 
withdraw during the course of the 
semester. Board refund is prorated, 
based upon food costs only. Special fees 
are not refundable. 

A student wishing to withdraw from 
Bethany must file written notice with 
the Dean of Students to qualify for 
refund of deposit and adjustment of 
other charges. 



Admission and 
Registration Fees 

Application for Admission 

A non-refundable $15 fee is required at 
the time of formal application. 

Application for Readmission 

Students previously enrolled in Bethany 
College who wish to return for 
additional work must file an Application 
for Readmission with the Registrar's 
Office. A $5 fee is required at the time 
such application is made. 

Registration Deposit 

Upon acceptance for admission or 
readmission, a $100 registration deposit 
is required of all students. Once this 
deposit is paid it is not refunded until 
after graduation or until a Bethany 
student completes the following 
procedure. 

Students not being graduated may have 
the deposit refunded after the last term 
of their attendance if written notice is 
given to the Business Office prior to the 
advance enrollment date for the next 
regular term. Such students may be 
readmitted by approval of the Dean of 
Students and the Business Manager. 

Matriculation Fee 

A $20 fee, payable once by every new 
student, covers, in part, the cost of 
orientation and evaluation procedures 
for new students. 



29 



Fees for Overseas 
Programs 

Oxford: 

$3,460 for one semester for tuition and 
fees, room and board and activity fees. 

Madrid: 

tuition and fees for one semester 
($2,770) includes round-trip air fare, 
tuition and examination fees and 
stipend to sponsor in Madrid. 

Sorbonne: 

tuition and fees for one semester 
($2,770) includes round-trip air fare, 
tuition and stipend to sponsor in Paris. 

Tubingen: 

tuition and fees for one semester 
($2,770) includes round-trip air fare, 
tuition and stipend to sponsor in 
Tubingen. 

Other Special Fees 

Chemistry 490 $20 

Education 470: off-campus student 

teaching {per semester) $2,655 

{includes tuition, fees and preschool 
week board privileges in the 
Bethany dining hall) 
English 284 $15 

Physical Education 340 $30 

Each academic hour when less 

than 13 $190 

Each academic hour 

in excess of 16 $160 

Auditing a course, per 

semester hour $160 

(a student is not charged if paying 
regular tuition and fees and the total 
program, including the audit, does not 
exceed 18 hours) 




Comprehensive Examination $25 

Graduation fee $35 

Special guidance and advisory fee 

(pre-college) $10 to $25 

Special examinations in any 

department $ 1 5 

(there is a $10 charge for each credit 

hour awarded by examination) 

Key deposit for dormitories $5 

(refunded if key is returned) 

Infirmary charge per day $5 

(after the first three days each semester) 

Late registration $3 

(per day) 

Automobile Registration $20 



Art Fees 




Art 105 


$15 


Art 110 


$15 


Art 210 


$15 


Art 303 


$15 


Art 304 


$15 


Art 310 


$15 


Art 320 


$5 


Art 325 


$20 


Art 404 


$10 


Art 425 


$20 


Art fees will also be required for 




independent study and studio courses 


where departmental materials are 


being 


used. 





Music Fees 

Private lessons, two weekly 

$145 per semester 
Private lesson, one weekly 

$80 per semester 
Organ Practice, one hour daily 

$35 per semester 
Instrument Rental 

$10 per semester 
Piano Practice, one hour daily 

$10 per semester 
Voice Practice, one or two hours daily 

$10 per semester 

Breakage Deposits 

Chemistry and physics breakage 
deposits are covered by a $5 breakage 
card which the student purchases each 
semester for every laboratory course in 
which he or she is enrolled. In the event 
breakage exceeds $5, an additional $5 
breakage card must be purchased. 
Unused portions are refunded at the 
end of each academic year. 



30 



Payment of Student 
Accounts 

At registration an invoice is prepared 
for each student, listing all charges due 
for the following semester. Payments 
are due in accordance with the 
following schedule: 

First Semester 

By August 15 a payment of $2,000. 
(Balance on account due October 15) 

Second Semester 

By January 15 a payment of $2,000. 
(Balance on account due March 15) 

Scholarships and loans may be applied 
as credit against August or January 
initial payment requirements. If after 
application of scholarships and/or loans, 
the balance is less than $2,000, the full 
balance is due and payable by August 15 
for the first semester and January 15 
for the second semester. All special 
student accounts for which total 
semester charges are $2,000 or less are 
payable in full by registration. 

Students will not be permitted to 
register if the initial payment 
requirements for each semester are not 
met, and they may be denied College 
privileges if subsequent payments are 
not completed as scheduled. These 
requirements are in addition to the 
registration deposit. Checks or drafts 
should be made payable to Bethany 
College. 

Bethany College bills for tuition, fees, 
room and board -twice yearly; other 
charges are billed as incurred. Twice 
yearly billings are payable in advance 
by August 15 and January 15 for the fall 
and spring semesters respectively. 
Charges for the fall semester which 
remain unpaid after October 15, and 



charges for the spring semester which 
remain unpaid after March 15 will be 
subject to service charges as per the 
schedule below: 

Accounts past due -up to $500-12% 
per year (1% per month) based on the 
balance outstanding the 25th of each 
month. 

Charges over $500-18% per year 
(1V2% per month) based on the balance 
outstanding the 25th of each month. All 
payments will be credited to the oldest 
charge. 

Students may not take final 
examinations, receive academic credit, 
obtain transcripts or graduate until 
satisfactory arrangements are made to 
cover financial obligations. 

Student Drawing 
Account 

The Business Office provides a limited 
banking service whereby students may 
deposit funds and draw on them as 
required. Students or their parents may 
make deposits to this recommended 
student drawing account which avoids 
the necessity of keeping on hand any 
substantial amount of money. All checks 
for this account must be made payable 
to the Bethany College Student 
Drawing Account. 

Monthly Payment 
Plans 

Bethany has made arrangements with 
the Insured Tuition Payment Plan 
whereby student accounts may be paid 
on a monthly basis during the year. 
Arrangements to use this plan should 
be made prior to the registration 
period. Information may be obtained by 
writing to the Business Office, and 
contract forms may be obtained by 
writing to the Insured Tuition Payment 
Plan, 53 Beacon St., Boston, Mass. 
02108. Contracts are to be completed by 
the parent or guardian of the student 
through direct negotiation with the 
payment plan office. Several other 
plans are also available. Contact the 
business manager. 



Financial Aid 

Bethany believes that funding of a 
student's education is primarily a family 
responsibility. However, financial 
assistance is available to those students 
whose resources will not fund a 
Bethany education and yet sincerely 
desire to attend. 

All of the College's financial assistance 
programs are awarded through careful 
evaluation of the Financial Aid Form 
(FAF), available through the college 
counseling offices of the student's high 
school. Designation of Bethany College 
as an appropriate institution to receive 
the processed information and 
indication of application for financial 
assistance on the admission application 
are the only procedures necessary to 
apply for financial aid. 

Because of the large number of 
applications for financial aid, 
assignment of funds is made according 
to the date requests are processed. The 
earlier a student completes all 
admission materials and submits the 
FAF, the faster the student will be 
awarded financial aid. However, the 
FAF should not be submitted until after 
January 1 since it also serves as an 
application for the Basic Educational 
Opportunity Grant Program. 



31 



A financial-aid applicant whose need for 
assistance has been verified by the 
College Scholarship Service will have 
his or her need met through a variety of 
financial aids, including scholarships, 
grants, loans, and College employment. 
The student has the option of accepting 
any or all of the aid offered. An 
interview with an officer of the College 
once the offer of assistance has been 
made can help to explain any problems. 
The Admission Office or the Financial 
Aid Office helps to arrange these 
interviews. 

Qualifications for 
Scholarships 

Bethany recognizes promise and 
intellectual attainment by awarding a 
number of scholarships. These awards 
vary in value and are available to a 
limited number of entering students. 
Most scholarships are awarded to 
freshmen on a four-year basis but are 
continued from year to year, as needed, 
only if the recipient has met the 
following conditions: 

1) A satisfactory scholarship index 

2) Satisfactory conduct as a student 

3) Worthwhile contributions to the 
college program 

4) Constructive citizenship in the college 
community 

5) Payment of student accounts as 
scheduled 



Scholarships 

All awards are made by the Scholarship 
and Financial Aid Committee in 
accordance with the requirements of 
the particular endowed fund. 

Rob Roy A lexander Scholarship - established 
to provide one or more scholarships for 
worthy and needy men and women, to be 
selected by the president. 

Alumni Scholarship Endowment - 
Established by the Alumni Council in 1981 to 
provide scholarships for children of Bethany 
College alumni. The initial funding for this 
endowment was provided by alumnus and 
Trustee Dr. Rodney B. Hurl. 

Patrick A. and Elizabeth Berry Scholarship 
- established by Miss Sara Cameron to 
assist students from Ohio. 

Bethany Women's Club Scholarship - 
established by the Bethany Women's Club to 
assist needy and worthy students. 

Bison Club Scholarship - provided by 
Bethany alumni with principal interest in 
intercollegiate athletics. 

Stanley F. Bittner Scholarship - established 
by a graduate of the Class of 1916 to provide 
general financial assistance. 

Ashley G. Booth Memorial Scholarship - 
provided by friends of Ashley G. Booth, 
minister of the Christian Church. 

Donald L. Boyd Memorial Scholarship - 
established by family and friends in memory 
of Donald L. Boyd, member of the Class of 
1921 and long-time trustee of the College. 

Jean A. Boyd Scholarship - established by 
bequest from donor. 

Thomas J. Boyd Scholarship - established 
by Thomas J. Boyd, member of the Class of 
1940. 

James B. Brennen HI Scholarship - 
established by the Will of Virginia Barton 
Brennen as a memorial for her son. 

Jonsie Brink Scholarship - awarded to 
worthy and eligible students. 

Isaac Brown Scholarship - used to cover 
part of the tuition charge. 

Calder Scholarship - established preferably 
for male students from the New England 
area majoring in one of the natural or life 
sciences. 



Argyle Campbell Memorial Scholarship - 
established by family and friends of Mr. 
Campbell to assist worthy and needy 
students. 

Chapman Scholarship - established by 
Stanton C. Crawford, a member of the class 
of 1918 and former Chancellor of the 
University of Pittsburgh, to honor a pioneer 
frontier family. 

Charnock Family Scholarship - established 
by Miss Ethel Charnock, member of the 
Class of 1912, to assist students at the 
sophomore level or above. 

Class of 1969 Scholarship - provided as a 
scholarship grant to begin with the 1984-85 
college year. First preference will be given 
to descendants of the Class of 1969. 

Class of 1970 Scholarship - provided as a 
scholarship grant to begin with the 1985-86 
college year. First preference will be given 
to descendants of the Class of 1970. 

M. M. Cochran Scholarship - established to 
cover a part of the tuition charge. 

James W. Carty, Jr. Scholarship - 
established by Carl A. Krumbach, a member 
of the class of 1973, to aid worthy students 
interested in journalism. 

Juanita R. Curran Scholarship - 
established to provide scholarship assistance 
to worthy students. 

Irene 0. Darnall Scholarship - established 
by Irene 0. Darnell to assist needy and 
worthy students. 

Helen Day Scholarship - awarded to 
members of Zeta Tau Alpha Sorority. 

Marion and Frank Dunn Scholarship - 
established by Frank K. Dunn, former 
Assistant to the President of Bethany 
College, to assist worthy and eligible 
students. 



32 



East Side Christian Church of Denver, 
Colorado, Scholarship - given to provide 
modest matching funds for a student at 
Bethany College. 

Ekas-Evans Scholarship - established by 
Dr. and Mrs. Ward Ekas of Rochester, New 
York, whose daughter, Elizabeth Ellen 
Ekas, was a member of the Class of 1957. 

Newton W. and Bessie Evans Scholarship - 
established by Mr. Newton W. Evans, 
former Bursar and Treasurer of Bethany 
College, to assist worthy students. 

Joe A. Funk II Scholarship - established by 
Bethany alumni and friends of the Funk 
family in memory of a young man who lost 
his life in Viet Nam. 

Samuel George Memorial Scholarship - 
established by bequest from the donor to 
provide one-fourth tuition scholarships to all 
graduates of Brooke (West Virginia) High 
School who qualify for admission. 

Greensburg Area Scholarship - established 
anonymously in 1953 to assist students of 
ability and need from the Greensburg, 
Pennsylvania, area. 

A leece C. Gresham Scholarship - presented 
as assistance to outstanding students in the 
field of music. 

Perry and Aleece Gresham. Scholarship - 
established by Dr. and Mrs. Perry E. 
Gresham to assist worthy and eligible 
students. Special consideration is given to 
young people interested in music or 
philosophy. 




Campbell A lien Harlan Scholarship - 
established by Mr. Campbell Allen Harlan, 
former Bethany College Trustee from 
Detroit, Michigan, to assist students of 
unusual ability in the fine arts. 

Florence M. Hoagland Memorial 
Scholarship - established for needy and 
worthy students by Miss Frances Cables of 
New Hampshire in memory of Florence M. 
Hoagland, Head of the Department of 
English and Advisor for Women at Bethany 
from 1936 to 1946. 

Home Family Scholarship Endowment - 
The Home Family Scholarship Endowment 
will provide assistance each year for a 
student of the Wheeling area preparing for a 
career in business. 

Ida M. Irvin Scholarship - awarded to a 
senior student. 

Flora Isenberg Scholarship - given to 
provide assistance for students of the liberal 
arts and sciences. 

A Ibert C. Israel Scholarship - used to apply 
to tuition of a descendant of Albert C. Israel. 

Kennedy-Jones Scholarship - provided by 
Violet Kennedy-Jones in honor of her family. 

John H. and Ida H. King Scholarship - 
awarded to students under terms approved 
by Trustees of the College in accordance 
with the will of the donors. 



George A. Kinley Scholarship - provided to 
assist worthy West Virginians. 

Forrest H. Kirkpatrick Scholarship - 
established by Dr. Kirkpatrick, member of 
the Class of 1927, to be used to help students 
who are sons or daughters of alumni. Dr. 
Kirkpatrick was a Bethany professor and 
dean for many years. 

Donald E. Lewis Memorial Scholarship - 
established by family, friends, and the Beta 
Beta Chapter of Kappa Alpha Order in 
memory of a graduate of the class of 1933. 

Robert N. "Buzz" Lewis, Jr., Memorial 
Scholarship Endowment - established by 
parents and friends of Robert N. "Buzz" 
Lewis '79, with priority for the utilization of 
the scholarship funds for his fraternity 
brothers in Sigma Alpha Epsilon. 

Emma A. Lyon Scholarship - given to 
memorialize a pioneer Christian missionary 
to China. The endowment was initiated by a 
gift from Mrs. Mary M. Farm of Hawaii. 

Maude Schultz Lytle Scholarship - 
established by friends and family in memory 
of a graduate of the Class of 1915. 

Janet Noll McCready Scholarship - 
established by Donald F. McCready, the 
husband of the late Janet Noll McCready to 
provide financial assistance to worthy 
students. 



33 




Charles L. and Rose Melenyzer Scholarship 

- established by Dr. Charles Melenyzer, 
member of the National Board of Fellows of 
Bethany College, to be used to assist worthy 
young people who attend Bethany. First 
consideration will be given to the young 
people of the Monongahela Valley. 

H. J. Morlan Scholarship - established by 
Halford J. Morlan to assist needy and 
worthy students. 

Louise Birch Myers Scholarship - used to 
promote international, intellectual, and 
cultural understanding through the support 
of scholarships for exchange students. 

William Kimbrough Pendleton Scholarship 

- established to assist students from West 
Virginia by Clarinda Pendleton Lamar in 
memory of her father, William Kimbrough 
Pendleton, member of the first faculty and 
second president of the College. 

Ralph E. Pryor Memorial Scholarship - 
established by family and friends of Judge 
Pryor, a member of the Class of 1942, with 
preference for students from the First 
Judicial Circuit of West Virginia. 

Eli and Lee Rabb Scholarship - used as 
scholarship assistance for students from the 
Upper Ohio Valley. 

Reader's Digest Foundation Scholarship - 
established by the Reader's Digest 
Foundation to assist worthy and needy 
students. 

Herbert and Marguerite Rech Scholarship - 
used to assist needy and eligible students. 

Renner Honor Scholarships - An endowed 
scholarship program funded by the Renner 
Foundation of Cleveland, Ohio, in honor of 
Bethany graduates R. Richard Renner, 
M.D., 17, and his wife, Jennie Steindorf 
Renner, '22, to recognize exceptionally able 
students for their outstanding achievement. 

Edwin K. Resseger, Jr. Memorial 
Scholarship - provided by Mr. and Mrs. 
Kenneth Resseger of the Class of 1933. 

James Derrick Reynolds Memorial 
Scholarship - established by parents and 
friends of a young man who lost his life in 
Viet Nam. 

E. E. Roberts Scholarship - created in 
memory of Professor E. E. Roberts who 
taught journalism at Bethany College from 
1928-1960. 



Louise Ford Rowan Scholarship - 
established in her memory by her son, 
Archibald H. Rowan of Texas, to provide 
financial assistance for a woman student. 

Archibald H. Rowan, Jr. Memorial 
Scholarship - established by Archibald H. 
Rowan of Texas, in memory of his only son. 
It is awarded annually to a male student. 

James J. Sawtell Scholarship Endowment - 
the income to be used each year to support a 
deserving student seeking an education. 

Richard B. Scandrett, Jr., Scholarship - 
established for the purpose of furthering 
international education and understanding. 

Richard L. Schanck Scholarship - 
established by friends in memory of Dr. 
Schanck, Professor of Sociology at Bethany 
College from 1952-1964. 

Elizabeth M. Schrontz Scholarship - 
established by bequest from the estate of 
Elizabeth Schrontz from Washington, 
Pennsylvania. 

Richard H. Slavin, Jr., Memorial 
Scholarship - given in memory of a 
graduate of the Class of 1950 who served as 
a Bethany faculty member from 1956-63. 

Paul Smyth Memorial Scholarship 
Endowment - established by his wife, Sue 
Culbert Smyth, '68, and parents Mr. and 
Mrs. John H. Smyth, and friends, in memory 
of Paul Smyth '68, who gave his life in 
service to country. 

Adelaide E. and Arthur C. Stifel 
Scholarship - established by Mr. and Mrs. 
Arthur C. Stifel of Wheeling, West Virginia. 



34 



Peter Tarr Heritage Scholarship - 
established by Geneva Tarr Elliott, member 
of the Class of 1927, to provide scholarship 
assistance to students in memory of the Tarr 
family's association with Bethany College 
since the days of its founding. 

Russell I. Todd Scholarship - a general 
scholarship endowment with preference for 
students planning to enter a health 
associated career. 

Stewart King Tweedy Memorial Scholarship 
- established by Mr. and Mrs. H. L. Tweedy 
and friends in memory of their son, member 
of the Class of 1964, who was killed in 
Viet Nam. 

W. W. Vines Scholarship Endowment - 
provided by a business associate of W. W. 
Vines, S. John Nitta, the income to be used 
each year to support a deserving student 
seeking an education. 

William H. Vodrey Scholarship - 
established by Mr. William H. Vodrey, a 
member of the Class of 1894, to assist 
students from the East Liverpool, Ohio, 
area. 

Nannine Clay Wallis Scholarship - given to 
provide financial assistance for students, 
preferably from Kentucky, enrolled at 
Bethany. 

Campbell-Hagerman-Watson Memorial 
Scholarship - established by a bequest from 
the estate of Mrs. Virginia Hagerman 
Watson, a member of the Class of 1904, to 
provide support for foreign exchange 
students. 

G. A. Willett Scholarship - established to 
cover part of the tuition charge. The student 
receiving this scholarship is to be nominated 
by a member of the Willett family. 



Designated 
Scholarships 

The following endowment scholarship 
funds have been established to assist 
students preparing for church-related 
vocations: 

Florence Abercrombie Scholarship - 
established by a bequest from the estate of 
Florence Abercrombie. 

Ada P. Bennett Memorial Scholarship - 
established by 0. E. Bennett, a member of 
the Class of 1925, and family and friends. 

Osborne Booth Scholarship - named after a 
long-time member of the Bethany faculty to 
provide financial assistance for students 
preparing for the ministry. 

Brightwood Christian Church Timothy 
Scholarship - established by members of 
the Brightwood Christian Church, Bethel 
Park, Pennsylvania. 

LottaA. Calkins Scholarship - established 
by a bequest from the estate of Lotta A. 
Calkins. 

Thomas Richard Deming Scholarship - 
established by friends, family, and members 
of the First Christian Church, Charleston, 
West Virginia. 

Elliott Family Memorial Scholarship Fund 
- established by Virgil and Geneva Elliott 
in honor of his mother and father, P. W. 
Elliott and Ella May Morse Elliott, and his 
brother, Victor Douglas Elliott. The purpose 
of the fund is to provide financial aid to 
ministerial students participating in varsity 
athletics. 

Fairhill Manor Christian Church Timothy 
Scholarship - established by the 
Washington, Pennsylvania, congregation. 

Jennie I. Hayes Scholarship - established 
by Jennie I. Hayes, a member of the Class of 
1904. 

Harry L. and Eva Ice Timothy Ministerial 
Scholarship - established by Mr. and Mrs. 
Robert H. Lee of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, 
honoring Dr. and Mrs. Ice in recognition of 
Dr. Ice's productive and untiring work in 
establishing and building Bethany's Timothy 
Ministerial Training Program. 



Maude Zeta G. McCracken Scholarship - 
established by a bequest of Maude Garlock 
McCracken, a member of the First Christian 
Church of Wheeling, for assistance to 
ministerial students. 

William H. McKinney Scholarship - 
established by family and friends in memory 
of a Bethany graduate of the Class of 1923 
to provide assistance for students preparing 
for church vocations. 

Isaac Mills Scholarship - provided to cover 
part of the tuition charge of a ministerial 
student. 

Herbert Moninger Scholarship - established 
in memory of Mr. Herbert Moninger, a 
graduate of the Class of 1898. 

Edward S. and Ruthella Hukill Moreland 
Scholarship - provided by members of the 
Walnut Hills Christian Church, Cincinnati, 
Ohio, and friends of an outstanding Disciple 
leader who was graduated from Bethany 
College in 1927. 

Mr. and Mrs. Arch R. Morgan Scholarship 

- established by these friends of Bethany 
College from Seattle, Washington. 

Parsons Memorial Timothy Scholarship - 
established by the Heights Christian Church, 
Shaker Heights, Ohio, and friends in 
memory of Dorothy and Waymon Parsons 
for dedicated leadership to this church and 
Brotherhood of Christian Churches 
(Disciples of Christ). 

E. J. and Imogene Penhorwood Scholarship 

- named for a Bethany graduate of the 
Class of 1918 to provide assistance for 
students preparing for the ministry. 

Perry Scholarship - established in memory 
of Professor and Mrs. E. Lee Perry. 
Professor Perry was a member of the Class 
of 1893, Professor of Latin at the College 
from 1908 to 1939, and Professor Emeritus 
from 1939 to 1948. 



35 



Reed-Law Ministerial Scholarship 
Endowment - provided by the Christian 
Church of Plymouth, Pennsylvania, in 
memory of the Reed family and Dr. Marjorie 
Reed Law, long-time members of that 
congregation. 

Rosemary Roberts Memorial Scholarship - 
established by family and friends in memory 
of a Bethany graduate of the Class of 1942 
to provide assistance for a woman preparing 
for Christian service. 

Sala Family Memorial Scholarship - 
established by Dr. John R. Sala, Class of 
1926, former Dean of the Faculty at Bethany 
College. 

Minnie W. Schaefer Scholarship - awarded 
to students preparing for Christian service. 

Edith and Chester A. Sillars Scholarship - 
established by Chester A. Sillars, former 
Director of Church Relations at Bethany 
College. 

Charles C. Smith Scholarship - established 
by family and friends in memory of Mr. and 
Mrs. C. C. Smith whose lives were dedicated 
to the Christian ministry. 

J. T. Smith Scholarship - established by Mr. 
J. T. Smith, friend of Bethany from 
Memphis, Tennessee. 

John E. Sugden, Jr. Fund - established to 
assist in the form of either loans or grants. 

Harriett Mortimore Toomey and John M. 
Toomey Scholarship - established by John 
C. Toomey and friends to assist students in 
musical education. 



Robert S. and Marie J. Tuck Scholarship - 
established by members of the Central 
Christian Church, Wooster, Ohio, where the 
Tucks, both Bethany graduates, served for 
44 years. 

HollisL. Turley Scholarship - established 
by a bequest from the estate of Hollis L. 
Turley, a member of the Class of 1925 and 
former Bethany trustee. 

Vinson Memorial Scholarship - established 
by Z. T Vinson, Class of 1878, through the 
Central Christian Church, Huntington, West 
Virginia. 

Raymond E. and Eunice M. Weed 
Scholarship - established by Dr. Raymond 
Weed, former curator of the Campbell 
Mansion near Bethany. 

Josiah N. and Wilminia S. Wilson 
Scholarship - established by Josiah N. 
Wilson to assist students preparing for the 
Christian ministry. 

The following endowed scholarship 
funds have been established to assist 
students from backgrounds of the 
Christian Church (Disciples of Christ): 

Fannie M. Bennett National Campbell 
Scholarship - established by a gift from the 
estate of Fannie Bennett who was a member 
of the Class of 1926. 

Ben and Leona Brown Scholarship - 
established by Mrs. Leona Brown of 
Washington, Pennsylvania, in memory of her 
husband. 

Jessie M. and Frank P. Fiess National 
Campbell Scholarship - established by Mr. 
and Mrs. Frank P. Fiess whose daughters, 
June Fiess Shackelford, Emma Lee Fiess 
Baldwin, and Frances Fiess Caldwell, were 
members of the Classes of 1941, 1944, and 
1959, respectively. 

V. J. Hopkins and Mary L. Hopkins 
Scholarship - operated under the principles 
of the National Campbell Scholarship 
program. 

National Campbell Scholarships - 
established in memory and honor of 
Alexander Campbell for the purpose of 
developing able and dedicated lay leadership 
in the Christian Church. Awards are in 
recognition of Christian service and 
academic accomplishment. 




36 



Richmond Avenue Christian Church of 
Buffalo Scholarship - established for 
students enrolled at Bethany from Western 
New York and preferably of Disciple 
background. 

Webster Groves Christian Church 
Scholarship - designed to provide financial 
assistance for students coming from the 
Christian Church (Disciples of Christ), 
preferably from Missouri. This scholarship 
was established in honor of Dr. Perry E. 
Gresham, twelfth president of Bethany 
College, and his wife, Aleece. 

External Thist 
Scholarships 

Through trust funds established in 
major banking houses, the following 
scholarship awards are available: 

Nelson Evans Cook Scholarship - created to 
memorialize an outstanding metallurgist by 
providing financial assistance for chemistry 
students. 

Catherine Graves Scholarship - given to a 
Bethany student from Wheeling, W. Va., in 
accordance with an educational trust fund 
established in the Pittsburgh National Bank. 

Hayes Picklesimer Scholarship - 
established by the West Virginia Emulation 
Endowment Trust to provide scholarship 
help for residents of West Virginia. 

William A. Stanley Scholarship - 
established by an outstanding West Virginia 
churchman who had lengthy careers in both 
education and business. 

Peter T. Whitaker Scholarship - created by 
a young graduate who found at Bethany the 
kind of education he sought. 



Sustained Awards 

A limited number of financial grants 
are available from the following 
annually sustained programs: 

H. L. Berkman Foundation Scholarship - 
provides an award for one or more students 
residing in the Upper Ohio Valley. 

A. Dale Fiers Ministerial Athletic 
Scholarship - awarded to recognize and 
encourage the scholastic and athletic skill of 
an outstanding upperclassman preparing for 
the Christian ministry. 

Scripps Howard Foundation Scholarship - 
provides assistance to journalism majors. 

Loan Funds 

The following loan funds have been 
established to assist students under the 
general supervision of the Scholarship 
and Financial Aid Committee: 

William G. and Carrie E. Bunyan Student 
Aid Fund - established by a bequest from 
the estate of the late Mrs. Bunyan of 
Brockway, Pennsylvania. 

Carman Loan Fund - established in honor 
of Martha Cox Carman of the Class of 1916 
and Forrest A. Carman of the Class of 1914 
by their son, Donald C. Carman. 

Charles N. and Edna Scott Jarrett Memorial 
Ministerial Loan Fund - established by 
their sons, friends and relatives to provide 
assistance for preministerial students. 

Merit and Marguertie May Student Loan 
Fund - established by Mr. and Mrs. Meril 
May of Garrettsville, Ohio. 

J. West Mitchell Medical Loan Fund - 
provided to assist premedical 
undergraduates and Bethany graduates 
enrolled in accredited medical schools. 

Phillips Loan Fund - established in 1890 by 
Thomas W. Phillips, Sr., of New Castle, 
Pennsylvania. 

Renner-Steindorf Student Loan Fund - 
established by Dr. R. R. Renner and his wife, 
Jennie Steindorf Renner, of Cleveland, Ohio. 

Ethel E. Sivon Student Loan Fund - 
established by family, friends, and members 
of the First Christian Church of Ravenna, 
Ohio. 




37 



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Academic 
Program 

The Bethany Plan 

Thoroughly based in the liberal arts 
tradition, the Bethany Plan is designed 
to help students develop the capacities 
to be intelligent, useful, free, and 
responsible persons. Its aim is to meet 
the educational needs of the individual 
while insuring breadth, depth, and 
integration of knowledge. 

The Plan recognizes that each person is 
unique, possessing goals and interests 
that are different from others. 
Consequently, a rich variety of learning 
opportunities are provided as options 
from which the student may choose. 
These include classroom-based and out- 
of -class programs ranging from 
seminars, lecture courses, independent 
studies, and laboratories to competitive 
sports, musical and dramatic 
productions, and student government 
(to name but a few). Many off -campus 
activities are also available, including 
study abroad. 




These learning opportunities are set 
within a framework of educational goals 
and programs which are organized to 
provide direction and guidance as well 
as independence and choice. The 
learning goals of the college are clearly 
stated (see page 6) and govern all 
aspects of education at Bethany. 

The Bethany Plan also includes an 
experience-based program, a group of 
four practicums which encourages 
students to become involved in the 
world of work, to exercise responsible 
citizenship, to develop physical and 
recreational skills, and to experience 
living in a culture different from their 
own. 



These learning opportunities are not 
random experiences. They are carefully 
planned by the student and his or her 
advisor. Students must continually 
justify their decisions and examine their 
academic and field experiences in 
relationship to their vocational and 
personal goals. 



39 




Academic Calendar Academic Advisor 



The Bethany calendar consists of two 
15-week semesters and a four-week 
voluntary interim session in January: 
The Fall semester - September to 
before Christmas; the Spring semester 
- February to the end of May; and the 
January Term - a voluntary session 
which students may elect to use for 
intensive study on campus or for off- 
campus work. 

Some courses are offered over the full 
15 weeks; others, for the first or second 
half of the semester. This division 
provides additional flexibility for 
students to do off -campus study and 
internships. 



The student/advisor relationship is the 
cornerstone of a Bethany education. 
The student and his or her advisor work 
together to develop appropriate 
classroom and experience-based 
programs. If not during private 
meetings, freshmen see their advisor 
two times a week during the first 
semester to discuss work in the 
freshman seminar. 

Usually during the sophomore year, 
students select a major field of 
concentration, thus transferring to an 
advisor associated with their major area 
of interest. 

Policy Appeals 
Board 

The faculty members who sit on the 
Policy Appeals Board evaluate student 
requests for exceptions to regular 
academic policies and regulations. 
Student requests are submitted in 
writing and should include the advisor's 
recommendation. 



Requirements for 
Graduation 

The Bachelor of Arts degree is 
conferred upon the student who 
satisfactorily completes the following 
requirements: 

1) 128 semester hours with a minimum 
cumulative grade point average of 2.0 

2) a freshman seminar 

3) a freshman interdisciplinary lecture 
course 

4) the distribution requirement 

5) a field of concentration 

6) demonstrated proficiency in 
expository writing 

7) a senior project 

8) the comprehensive examination in 
the major field 

9) the practicum requirement 

10) the residence requirement 

11) attendance at the commencement 
exercise 

The degree of Bachelor of Science may 
be conferred upon a student who 
completes the Bachelor of Arts 
requirements and who chooses to major 
in any one of the following 
departments: biology, chemistry, 
mathematics, physics, or psychology 
(B.S. plan). 

Freshman Studies 



Program 



Freshman Seminar: All entering 
freshmen enroll in a freshman seminar 
during the fall semester of the 
freshman year. The professor directing 
the seminar also serves as the student's 
advisor. 



40 



Freshman Interdisciplinary Course: 
Freshmen elect a freshman 
interdisciplinary course in the spring 
semester of the freshman year. 

For descriptions of the courses offered 
in this program see pages 51-52. 

Practicum Program 

The practicum program is a progressive 
effort to make a student's academic 
studies more relevant to the everyday 
world. The practicums are practical 
experiences encompassing values 
Bethany believes to be essential to a 
complete education. 

Students complete four practicums in a 
non-classroom setting in which they 
actualize the goals of the College. These 
four practicums are (1) an example of 
responsible citizenship, (2) an 
awareness and involvement in health, 
physical education and recreation, 
(3) an intercultural living experience, 
and (4) a vocationally oriented 
placement. The successful completion of 
the four practicums is required for 
graduation. 

Each practicum experience should be a 
self-examination of values related to 
that practicum; a demonstration that 
liberal studies are relevant to personal 
development and to the fulfillment of 
obligations as a citizen. 

With the assistance of the student's 
advisor and the director of practicums, 
the student develops practicum 
proposals. These proposals must have 



the approval of a faculty member and 
meet the guidelines established for each 
practicum. After each practicum, the 
student completes an evaluation of the 
experience. 

The development of meaningful 
practicum experiences is an important 
part of the academic program, and the 
College is committed to providing 
competent counseling and assistance to 
the students. 

Seniors must fulfill all proposals by 
February 10 and all evaluations by April 
15 of the graduation year. 

Further information concerning the 
practicum program may be obtained by 
contacting the director of practicums. 

Distribution 
Requirement 

To insure breadth of knowledge among 
its graduates, Bethany requires a 
demonstration of competence in a 
variety of disciplines. 

Every student must elect at least 12 
hours from each of the three following 
divisions: 

Social Sciences 

Communications 101, 402; Economics; 
Education 201, 202, 401; History; 
Political Science; Social Science; and 
Sociology. 

Physical and Life Sciences 

Biology; Chemistry; General Science 
100, 101, 201, 202, 209, 210, 211; 
Mathematics; Physics; and Psychology. 

Humanities 

Art; Communications 206; Fine Arts; 
Foreign Languages; Literature; Music; 
Philosophy; Religious Studies; and 
Theatre. Not more than four hours may 
be earned in applied fine arts courses. 

All courses taken to satisfy distribution 
and field of concentration requirements 
must be taken on a graded basis. 

Any student may be exempted from the 
distribution requirement in any one of 
the three divisions through successful 
completion of the Undergraduate 




Record Examination by the end of the 
sophomore year with a score equal to or 
surpassing the national norm. 

All students are required to pass 
Religious Studies 100. Generally, this 
course is taken in the freshman or 
sophomore year. This course may be 
used to fulfill part of the distribution 
requirement in humanities. 



41 



Field of 
Concentration 

The field of concentration may be either 
departmental or faculty-student 
initiated. The following guidelines 
specifically exclude any language 
requirements necessary for professional 
certification or for admission to a 
graduate program. 

A departmental field consists of a 
minimum of 24 credit hours (excluding 
the senior project) and a maximum of 
48 hours within the department. No 
more than 24 hours from related 
disciplines may be required by a 
department. 

The faculty-sponsored or student- 
initiated field, which may cut across 
departmental lines, may be developed. 
This interdisciplinary field of 
concentration requires the approval of 
the Committee on Interdisciplinary 
Study. Such fields consist of a minimum 
of 24 hours (excluding the senior 
project) and a maximum of 72 hours. 
No more than 48 hours in any one 
department will be counted toward 
graduation. Examples of faculty- 
sponsored programs approved by the 
Committee on Interdisciplinary Study 
include a Mathematics- Physics program 
for pre-engineering and a Sports- 
Communications program. The 
interdisciplinary studies program is 
described on page 93. 



Writing Proficiency 
Requirement 

All students must achieve and maintain 
an above-average level of proficiency in 
expository writing. They may do this 
either by taking the annual Writing 
Qualification Test or by satisfactory 
completion of selected writing courses 
offered by the English Department. 

Students who choose to satisfy the 
requirement by enrolling in writing 
courses may do so by electing from the 
following: English 101-109, 120, 125, 
140, 150, 205, 210, 213, or 351. No more 
than one course per academic year will 
apply to the requirement. See below for 
the number of courses needed to satisfy 
the writing proficiency requirement. 

The Department of English will certify 
to the Registrar that a student has 
satisfied the writing proficiency 
requirement for graduation when 
proficiency has been demonstrated in 
one of the following ways: 

1. By achieving a high level of 
proficiency on both the first Writing 
Qualification Test, taken in November 
of the freshman year, and the second 
Writing Qualification Test, taken in 
April of the sophomore year; or by 
achieving a grade of C + or better in a 
writing course taken instead of either 
or both of these tests. A student whose 
proficiency is certified in this way is 
not required to take additional tests or 
courses. 

2. By taking the first Writing 
Qualification Test in November of the 
freshman year and achieving a high 
level of proficiency on the third test, 
taken in April of the junior year. 

Students who have not met the writing 
proficiency requirement before the 
beginning of their seventh semester must 
enroll in English 120, a non-credit, non- 



graded course in expository writing. 
Special Writing Qualification Tests are 
given as part of this course, and 
students must continue in the course 
until they have achieved a high level of 
proficiency on one of the special tests. 
Special Writing Qualification Tests are 
given to seniors only when enrolled in 
the course. 

Special arrangements are made for 
students who transfer from other 
colleges. Transfer students should 
consult the Department of English 
immediately upon enrolling at Bethany. 

Additional information about the 
Writing Qualification Tests and courses 
may be found on page 77. 

Senior Project 

Every student must produce a project 
which meets the standards of his or her 
field of concentration. The project is 
received and evaluated during the final 
semester of the senior year. Two to 
eight hours of credit are given after the 
final evaluation and approval of the 
project. Scheduling of the project is at 
the discretion of the department or the 
student's advisory committee. 

The project is evaluated by at least one 
person in the field of concentration 
other than the student's advisor(s). The 
final evaluation is made in consultation 
with the student. The project is made 
available to the College community. 



42 



Senior 

Comprehensive 

Examination 

Each student must pass the Senior 
Comprehensive Examination. All 
requirements in the field of 
concentration must be met and the 
student must have senior standing and 
a 2. cumulative average in the field of 
concentration before the examination 
may be taken. 

The examination consists of two parts, 
written and oral. In some departments, 
sections of the Undergraduate Record 
Examination may also be considered 
part of or prerequisite to the Senior 
Comprehensive. 



The examination is given twice yearly, 
in January and in May. The oral part of 
the examination is scheduled by the 
registrar as soon as practicable after 
the written, but in no case more than 
two weeks later. 

Seniors who have completed all the 
requirements in their field of 
concentration may take the 
examination in January with the 
consent of their advisor(s). 

Students failing the examination may 
take it again in May. 

Students in departments which consider 
sections of the Undergraduate or 
Graduate Record Examination as part 
of the Senior Comprehensive 
Examination take the URE or GRE 
immediately preceding their written 
and oral examinations. 




Students who fail the examination may 
take it at any time it is regularly given 
within the following 12 months. If they 
fail a second time, they may petition the 
faculty for a re-examination during the 
following year. No student may take the 
examination more than three times. 

Policy on Work 
Internships 

A student may spend a semester 
combining practical professional 
experience with formal off -campus 
study. A student wishing to do this 
must arrange a full-time job in his or 
her chosen area and arrange 
independent study integrating this 
work experience with formal theoretical 
study. 

A written proposal, signed by the 
department in which the student 
intends to earn academic credit, must 
be submitted to the Curriculum Review 
Board of the College. This proposal 
must also be signed by the faculty 
member charged with supervising and 
evaluating the project. The proposal 
must include a description of the 
student's goals in undertaking the 
program, a description of the 
experience that includes a summary of 
his or her responsibilities and the name 
of his or her supervisor, a description of 
the formal independent study course 
work, an explanation of the way in 
which the program relates the work 
experience and the formal independent 
study course work, and a description of 
the methods to be used in supervising 
and evaluating the entire project. 

Eight credit-hours will be awarded for 
satisfactory completion of the project. 
No additional academic work may be 
taken during the semester of the 
project. 



43 



Residence 
Requirement 

Four years are usually required to 
satisfy the course and residence 
requirements for the baccalaureate 
degree. Students of superior ability 
may complete the requirements in less 
time. As a rule, the senior year or the 
last two semesters are to be spent in 
residence at the College. However, 
students who have had one full year of 
residence previous to their senior year, 
and who apply for and are approved by 
the Policy Appeals Board for off- 
campus study programs during their 
senior year, may sometimes be 
permitted to count that work toward 
graduation requirements. 

Information and guidelines concerning 
specific off-campus programs are given 
in subsequent sections of the catalog. 

Independent Study 

Each department offers independent 
study for those students who have 
demonstrated the ability to work 
individually in some area of special 
interest. The student selects an area of 
study, subject to the approval of the 
head of the department, after which he 
or she completes an Application for 
Independent Study in the Registrar's 
Office before the start of that semester. 




January Term 

The January Term provides 
opportunities for students to 
supplement and extend the learning 
experiences available during the 
traditional academic year. In January, 
students may participate in 
experimental courses, study single 
topics intensively, travel and study in 
various parts of the world, undertake 
an independent study, or fulfill a 
practicum. 

During January, course offerings at 
other colleges across the country, 
including many foreign and domestic 
travel programs, are open to Bethany 
students through an exchange program. 

Participation in the January Term is 
entirely voluntary. 

Summer Terms 

There are two five-week summer terms 
and an 11-week independent study 
period. Most summer school courses are 
taught as seminars, tutorials, or 
independent studies. For additional 
information, consult with the director 
of the summer school. 



Cooperative U.S. 
Study Offerings 

Academic Common Market 

Bethany is a member of the Academic 
Common Market, an interstate 
agreement among southern states for 
sharing academic programs. This 
agreement allows Bethany students, 
who qualify for admission, to apply for 
enrollment in 80 graduate degree 
programs in other common market 
states on an in-state tuition basis. This 
program is sponsored by the Southern 
Regional Education Board. Further 
information concerning the Academic 
Common Market may be obtained by 
contacting the director of placement. 

Engineering Programs 

Special arrangements have been made 
with Columbia University in New York 
City (The Combined Plan), Georgia 
Institute of Technology in Atlanta 
(Dual-Degree Program), and 
Washington University in St. Louis 
(Three-Two Plan) for students 
interested in becoming professional 
engineers or applied scientists. 

Students participating in one of these 
programs spend three years in the 
liberal arts environment at Bethany 
College and then attend either 
Columbia, Georgia Tech, or Washington 
University for an additional two years. 
The programs permit the student to 
earn both a bachelor's degree from 
Bethany and a B.S. in engineering or 
applied science from the cooperating 
engineering school upon completion of 
the five-year sequence. 

The broad educational experience 
gained at Bethany and the engineering 
school is aimed at producing engineers 
and applied scientists who are better 
prepared to meet the social, political, 
economic, and environmental problems 
of today's world. 



44 




Entering freshmen who are interested 
in this program should select the 
appropriate level calculus course and 
either Chemistry 101 or Physics 201, 
depending on their career interest. This 
will allow for maximum freedom in 
course selection and career choice in 
subsequent semesters. Interested 
students should consult with the 
engineering advisor at their earliest 
convenience. 



Washington Semester 

Arrangements have been made for one 
or two advanced students in history, 
political science, economics, or 
sociology to pursue studies in these 
fields under the direction of the 
American University in Washington, 
D.C. A student participating in this 
plan takes six to nine hours in regular 
academic work and six to nine hours in 
the study of government supervised by 
Bethany College and American 
University. Participants in the program 
must be recommended by the program 
advisor and have the approval of the 
Dean of the Faculty. 

The Department of Political Science 
and History administers a program in 
conjunction with the West Virginia 
University Foundation in which an 
outstanding junior or senior is selected 
each year to spend one week in 
Charleston studying three branches of 
state government. Two hours of credit 
may be granted for this program. 




45 



Overseas Study 
Offerings 

Under approved supervision and 
direction, qualified students may secure 
credit for formal work completed in 
foreign colleges and universities. To be 
eligible for study abroad, the student 
should normally be a junior and must 
have the approval of the External 
Programs Committee. 

Madrid Study Program 

Under special arrangement with the 
University of Madrid, qualified Bethany 
students may enroll for a semester or 
full year at the university. 

Oxford Semester 

Under this program, approximately 20 
students spend the fall semester in 
Oxford, England, studying British 
literature, history, and culture with a 
Bethany professor. Participants are 
matriculated as full-time students at 
Bethany College, but live and study in 
Britain. 

Paris Sorbonne Program 

Under special arrangement with the 
Sorbonne, qualified Bethany students 
may enroll for a semester or full year in 
its Cours de Langue et de Civilisation 
Franchise. Bethany's official 
representative in Paris serves as 
counselor to Bethany students during 
their stay at the Sorbonne. 



Tubingen Study Program 

Qualified students are given an 
opportunity to do intensive study in the 
German language and to work out an 
individualized program at the 
University of Tubingen, Germany. An 
adjunct member of the Bethany faculty 
serves as mentor. 

Other Overseas Programs 

There are additional overseas programs 
in which Bethany students have 
participated. These include: 

1) Beaver College Semester at the City 
College of London (England) 

2) University of Glasgow, Scotland 

3) American University, Beirut, 
Lebanon 

The coordinator of international 
education programs provides interested 
students with information concerning 
programs which have been examined 
and approved. 

Continuing 
Education Program 

Believing that education is a life-long 
process, Bethany has instituted a non- 
degree, non-traditional program of 
continuing education within the 
framework of the liberal arts tradition 
of the College. The Leadership Center 
for Continuing Education serves as the 
physical setting for the vast majority of 
instructional activities in this program. 

Continuing Education Units (CEUs) are 
awarded (one for every 10 contract 
hours) to participants in the program. 
The Registrar's Office maintains a 
continuing education transcript for each 
participant. 

Most continuing education programs at 
Bethany comprise intensive, short- 
term, residential and off-campus 
seminars, institutes, courses and 
workshops which are aimed at assisting 
people of all ages and backgrounds to 
deal with the complexities of modern 
living. 




Some of the offerings are developed by 
Bethany's faculty and staff while others 
are conducted by a broad spectrum of 
business, industrial, educational, 
professional, and church organizations 
which bring their students and 
educational formats to the Leadership 
Center. 



46 



External Programs 

Bethany College operates a number of 
external programs to meet the 
continuing needs of the community and 
the region. By meeting these needs 
through its external programs, Bethany 
College is able to adjust to change and 
monitor the educational pulse of the 
area. 

Leadership Center 

Leadership Center, Bethany's award 
winning conference center, is first 
choice of the top Fortune 500 
companies for conference and 
management seminars. Current course 
offerings in the Center's Executive 
Development Program include 
"Management," based on United States 
Steel's series, "Engineering Project 
Management," "Processes in Decision 
Making," and "Management Principles." 
Plans call for continued expansion of 
the Executive Development series to 
meet the training needs of area 
business and industry. 

Leadership Center is the only solar- 
powered satellite training site in the 
world. 

Summer Programming 

Each summer, thousands are involved 
in band, tennis and church camps 
conducted on the Bethany College 
campus. More than 2,500 were on 
campus last summer for programs 
which included as many as 500 to 600 
participants and as few as six. Church 
groups from throughout the nation 
spend a few days or more than a week 



in Conference. Schools from Ohio, 
Pennsylvania and West Virginia send 
their bands to campus for week-long 
practice and training. Tennis, for both 
juniors and adults, attract hundreds. 
Retreats and performing arts 
workshops are among the activities 
included in summer programming, and 
soccer camps and boys' and girls' sports 
camps round out the summer program 
schedule. 

Policy on 

Cross-Listed 

Courses 

When a course which is part of a 
department's requirements for its field 
of concentration is cross-listed, a 
student concentrating in that field may 
register for the course in any 
department in which it is cross-listed, 
but it will count as part of the 
maximum credit which may be earned 
by the student within the department of 
his or her field of concentration. 

Course Load 

A normal semester load is 16 hours. 
However, a student may elect activities 
courses (music, chorus, band, physical 
education) up to two hours with no 
additional fee charge. For example, a 
student could elect a one-hour activity 
course, two one-hour activity courses, 
or a two-hour activity course. Thus, the 
maximum academic course load is 16 
hours plus two hours of activities 
courses. Permission to take additional 
courses must be obtained from the 
Dean of the Faculty. Fees will be 
charged for any such approved courses. 
Applications for excess hours are 
available in the Registrar's Office. A 
full-time student is defined as any 
student carrying at least 12 hours per 
semester. 




47 




s 



Grading System 

Letter grades given and their 
equivalents in quality points are: 



A 


4.00 


A- 


3.75 


B + 


3.25 


B 


3.00 


B- 


2.75 


C + 


2.25 


c 


2.00 


c- 


1.75 


D + 


1.25 


D 


1.00 


D- 


.75 


F 


.00 



Students are required to take at least 
100 hours of letter-graded work. 

Grades mean: A, Superior; B, 
Excellent; C, Average; D, Below 
Average; F, Failure. 



Other report abbreviations and their 
meanings are: 

Cr. Credit. No quality points. 

NCr. No-Credit. No quality points or 
academic penalty. 

F. Failure. No quality points; denotes 
work that is unsatisfactory. 

Inc. Incomplete. Incomplete work is a 
result of sickness or some other 
justifiable reason. An incomplete must 
be removed by the end of the fourth 
week of the following semester, unless 
an extension of time is granted by the 
Dean of the Faculty. It is not possible 
for a student to remove an incomplete 
after 12 months. 

W. Withdrawn. No penalty. 

WF. Withdrawn failing. No quality 
points; indicates a course dropped with 
permission after the fifth week of the 
semester, with the student failing at the 
time of withdrawal. A grade of WF has 
the same effect on the student's grade- 
point average as an F. 

Any student who carries 12 hours of 
letter-graded academic work may elect 
to take additional work on a Credit- No 
Credit basis in courses which are not 
used for the field of concentration or 
the distribution requirement. 

A report of the scholastic standing of 
students is received at the Registrar's 
Office at mid-semester in addition to 
the final semester reports. These 
reports are sent to the faculty advisor 
and the parents or guardians of each 
student. 



Change of Schedule 

During the first five class days of each 
semester, a student, with the approval 
of his advisor, may drop or add any 
course. No classes may be added after 
this time. With proper approval, a 
student may drop a course any time 
before the final. 

Classification of 
Students 

For sophomore rank a student must 
have at least 25 hours of academic 
credit. Admission to full junior standing 
is conditioned upon the student having 
at least 60 hours of academic credit. 
For senior class rank the student must 
have at least 94 hours of academic 
credit. 

Students are not considered candidates 
for the baccalaureate degree until they 
have been granted senior classification, 
have filed an application to take the 
Senior Comprehensive Examination in 
their field of concentration, and have 
filed an application for a degree. 

Class Attendance 



Policy 



Students are expected to attend all 
classes and appropriate laboratory 
meetings of a course and to participate 
in all outside activities that are a part of 
the course. 

It is the responsibility of individual 
instructors to evaluate the importance 
of participation in determination of 



48 



course grades. Students and faculty 
should demonstrate concern for each 
other in attendance matters. The Dean 
of Students grants excused absences in 
the event of serious, personal or family 
emergencies or authorized college 
events. 

Withdrawal 

An honorable dismissal is granted to 
students in good standing who may 
desire to withdraw from the College if 
they have satisfied their advisor and a 
responsible officer of the College that 
there is a good reason to justify such 
action. Students asking to withdraw 
should present a written request to the 
Dean of Students along with a 
statement of approval from parent or 
guardian. The recommendation of the 
Dean of Students is next presented to 
the Business Manager and then to the 
Registrar for final record. No 
withdrawal is considered complete until 
this procedure has been carried out. 



Probation 



The term "on probation" is applied to 
students who are allowed to continue at 
Bethany after having failed to meet the 
standards expected by the faculty and 
administration. Students may be placed 
on probation for any of the following 
causes: 

1) Unsatisfactory scholastic record. The 
following academic basis will be used to 
determine probation each semester: 
Freshmen must achieve at least 1.7, 
Sophomores 1.8, and Juniors and 
Seniors 2.0. 

2) Unsatisfactory class attendance 
during the semester or preceding 
semester. 

3) Unsatisfactory conduct at any time. 



Probation is intended to be a warning to 
students (and to their parents or 
guardians) that their record is 
unsatisfactory and that unless 
significant improvement is made they 
will be asked to withdraw from the 
College. At the end of a semester on 
probation the student's total record is 
reviewed. Continued enrollment 
depends upon the trend of academic 
performance. The Policy Appeals Board 
may dismiss any student if the student 
is not likely to meet the requirements 
for graduation in the usual period of 
four years. An extension of the four- 
year period is granted only when there 
are extenuating circumstances. 

Special 
Examinations 

A student justifiably absent from a final 
examination or a test given in 
connection with regular class work is 
permitted to take a special test without 
payment of fees with the consent of the 
instructor and approval of the Dean of 
the Faculty. For any other examination 
a fee must be paid at the Business 
Office before the examination is taken, 
and the proper receipt must be 
presented to the instructor at the time 
of the examination. 

Transcript of 
Records 

Students wishing transcripts of records 
in order to transfer to other schools or 
for other purposes should make 
application to the Registrar's Office at 
least one week before the transcript is 
needed. Transcripts are issued only at 
the request of the student, and official 
transcripts are sent directly to the 
college or university specified by the 
student. One transcript is furnished to 
each student without charge; for each 
additional transcript a fee of $1.00 is 
charged. When three or more 
transcripts are ordered at the same 
time, the first transcript is $1.00, 
whereas the others cost $.50 each. Fees 
must accompany the request. All 
financial obligations to the College must 
be paid before a transcript is issued. 



Schedule of 
Course Offerings 

Most courses listed in departments are 
offered annually. However, many are 
offered every other year and a few are 
offered in three-year cycles. 

Students should see respective 
department heads for long-range course 
planning. 

Changes in 
Regulations 

Bethany reserves the right to amend 
the regulations covering the granting of 
degrees, the courses of study, and the 
conduct of students. Membership in 
Bethany College and the receiving of its 
degrees are privileges, not rights. The 
College reserves the right (and the 
student concedes to the College the 
right) to require the withdrawal of any 
student at any time. 

Invalidation of 
Credits 

Courses completed at Bethany or 
elsewhere, more than 10 calendar years 
before the date of proposed graduation, 
are not accepted for credit toward 
graduation. All candidates are expected 
to comply with degree requirements in 
effect at the time of acceptance of the 
degree application. With the approval 
of the Policy Appeals Board and the 
payment of the required fee, the 
candidate may take examinations, as 
administered by the various 
departments, for courses included in 
the current curriculum, to reinstate 
academic credit that may have been 
declared invalid because of date. 



49 



Courses Index 

Freshman Studies 51 

Art 53 

Astronomy 55 

Biology 56 

Chemistry 58 

Communications 60 

Computer Science 63 

Economics and Business 65 

Education 68 

English 76 

Fine Arts 81 

Foreign Languages 83 

General Sciences 87 

Geography 87 

Health Science 88 

Heuristics 88 

History and Political Science 89 

Interdisciplinary Studies 93 

Library 94 

Mathematics 95 

Music 97 

Philosophy 101 

Physical Education 103 

Physics 108 

Psychology 111 

Religious Studies 114 

Social Sciences 117 

Sociology and Social Work 118 

Theatre 121 



50 




Course 
Descriptions 

Freshman Studies 

Interdisciplinary Lecture 100 4 hours 

Sec. 1 The New Religion of Technocracy 

An examination of some of the components 
of modern western society, from electrical 
guitars to computers to social wants and 
needs. This course will look upon western 
society at work and at play and will study its 
potential survival in terms of its technocratic 
base. (Stanley L. Becker, Professor of 
General Science) 

Sec. 2 Nazism, Hitler, and the Crises of 
Life 

A survey of major tenents of Adolph Hitler 
and an analysis of the historical, 
philosophical, and political roots of German 
National Socialism. Lectures and movies 
demonstrate how Nazism affected various 
phases of German culture and life (art, 
sports, education, home, church, etc.) The 
student is assisted in relating the specific 
issues raised by Nazism to more general 
human questions concerning the meaning of 
suffering, ethical decision-making, personal 
commitment and integrity, and the uses of 
power. (Richard B. Kenney, T. W. Phillips 
Professor of Old Testament Literature) 

Sec. 3 The Sixties: A View From the 
Popular Culture 

An examination of value transformation and 
transmission in the 1960's. Special attention 
will be paid to the way in which the popular 
culture, film, TV, magazines, literature 
(fiction and non-fiction) presented the '60's 
as a time of change and, sometimes, the 
substance of change. The critical years of 
1963 and 1968 will receive special attention. 
(Larry E. Grimes, Associate Professor of 
English) 



Sec. 4 Leisure and Work: The Inter- 
relationship 

Within the milieu of our culture, leisure 
activities may influence human relationships 
to social structure and values, free us from 
impairing psychological and physiological 
behavior states, and achieve a wholesome 
relationship to the work ethic. Emphasis in 
this course will focus on the development of 
leisure philosophies; theories of play; factors 
affecting leisure such as demography, 
technology, and population; motivation and 
leisure behavior; economic impact of leisure 
on society; and leisure as an integral aspect 
of our lives. (David M. Hutter, Associate 
Professor of Physical Education) 

Freshman Seminar III 4 hours 

Sec. A Hatfields and McCoys: 
Appalachian Myths, Legend, and Reality 

This seminar represents a humanistic and 
social scientific venture in regional- 
community study. It takes advantage of 
West Virginia's unique position as a 
laboratory for such inquiry. It explores such 
factors as ethnic patterns and diversities, 
struggles for modernization, demographic 
trends, and socio-cultural attitudes. Students 
will explore the myths, legends and realities 
of Appalachia through selected Appalachian 
literature, films, field trips and crafts 
activities. (Lynn Adkins, Associate Professor 
of Sociology and Social Work) 

Sec. B Religion Explosion: Varieties of 
Spiritual Experience 

This seminar will explore the growth and 
attraction of the varied religious experiences 
which have become a prominent feature of 
contemporary American life. Several of the 
most important cults and sects will be 
carefully studied and contrasted with 
mainstream and orthodox religious 
experience. (William B. Allen, College 
Chaplain) 

Sec. C The Thrill of Victory. The Agony of 
Defeat 

This seminar will explore the role of sports 
in American society, examining the social, 
economic, psychological, and recreational 
functions of both professional and amateur 
sports. On the basis of this study, students 
attempt to determine the possible direction 
for sports in the future and to ascertain the 
positive and negative results of sports in the 
present. (James E. Allison, Associate 
Professor of Mathematics) 



■ ¥S 




Sec. D Sensitivity to the Natural World 

This seminar is an introduction to the 
natural world based upon the observation of 
plants and animals in their natural settings. 
Most sessions will be held outdoors at 
Bethany and at several nearby, important 
natural sites. (Albert R. Buckelew, Jr., 
Associate Professor of Biology) 

Sec. E Philosophy and Politics of Non- 
violence 

This seminar will study non-violence in the 
spirit and actions of Jesus, George Fox, 
Gandhi, Martin Luther King and Cesar 
Shavez. It will examine the validity on non- 
violence as a principle for our own lives and 
as an alternative method of dealing with 
contemporary problems. (Leonora Balla 
Cayard, Associate Professor of Foreign 
Languages) 



51 



Sec. F Sports Legends and Personalities 

This seminar explores the lives of famous 
sports figures of the 20th century. 
Personalities to be studied include (among 
others) Babe Didreksen Zaharias, Vince 
Lombardi, Muhammed Ali, and Billie Jean 
King. Students examine the sociological, 
psychological, and economic impact of sport 
in the lives of these people, the impact of 
their contribution on sports, and the 
implications of these impacts on our own 
individual sport experiences. (James Dafler, 
Assistant Professor of Physical Education) 

Sec. G Play and Games 

A serious study and analysis of play as a 
reflection and shaper of culture from 
antiquity to the present. Much time will be 
spent out of class engaging in simulation, 
role or adventure gaming, and no-loss 
games. (John U. Davis, Associate Professor 
of Education) 

Sec. H Medical Practice in Ancient and 
Modern Times 

A consideration of the history of medical 
practice from the time of the medicine man 
through folk medicine and early scientific 
discoveries, to modern medicine and 
surgery. Time will be devoted to the 
biographical study of certain physicians as 
well as to current problems of health care 
for all citizens. (J. Daniel Draper, Professor 
of Chemistry) 



52 



Sec. J The Television Generation 

This seminar will explore the impact that 
television has on the individual and on 
society. Areas to be examined include 
advertising, race and sex stereotypes, 
television as a narcotic, and television's 
increasing role in education. Stuents will be 
introduced to techniques of production and 
to television equipment and will write, 
perform and produce an original television 
show as a culmination of the seminar. 
(Kurt P. Dudt, Instructor in 
Communications) 

Sec. K Cowboys, Gangsters, and 
Private Eyes 

Students will read and/or view works as 
diverse as Sophocles' Oedipus Tyrannus, 
The Hounds of the Baskervilles, Machiavelli's 
The Prince, The Godfather, High Plains 
Drifter, I, the Jury and High Noon in an 
effort to determine the form and function of 
the above genres. Particular attention will 
be given to ratiocination, vs. violence, justice 
vs. law, rugged individualism vs. the family, 
and sex roles in society. (Larry E. Grimes, 
Associate Professor of English) 

Sec. L The Human Struggle Through 
Sport 

This seminar explores through the medium 
of sport literature the impact of sport on 
society and self. In it, students will examine 
the social and psychological effects on 
participants and consumers of sport through 
study of fiction, essays and poetry having a 
sport motif. Topics include racism, sexism, 
love, death, age and winning. (David M. 
Hutter, Associate Professor of Physical 
Education) 

Sec. M Challenge Yourself 

This seminar will provide an opportunity to 
explore and take part in challenging topics 
and activities. We will study individuals who 
have accepted challenges, examine issues 
which challenge us in our daily life, and 
participate in recreational and sports related 
activities which provide both individual and 
group challenges. (Joseph McGraw, 
Assistant Dean of Students and Coordinator 
of Freshmen Residence Halls) 

Sec. N Crime and Punishment 

A study of the nature and causes of 
criminals and crime followed by an 
examination of systems of punishment and 
rehabilitation will constitute the major 
activity of this course. Students will also 
tour prisons and briefly intern in a prison if 
arrangements can be made (this is a big if). 
(John W. Lozier, Associate Professor of 
History) 



Sec. O Computers: Fact and Fiction 

Students will explore the myth of the 
computer in modern society. They will read 
fiction by writers such as Vonnegut and 
Arthur Clarke, as well as essays by futurists 
such as Alvin Toffler. Students will also 
learn to use the computer as a helper and to 
know it as a friend. (J. Trevor Peirce, 
Professor of Psychology) 

Sec. P. Faustus: From Legend to 
Literature 

A study in comparative literature 
concerning the use of the Faustus myth by 
Marlowe, Goethe and Mann. Some attention 
will be paid to musical treatments of the 
theme. (John R. Taylor, Professor of 
English) 

Sec. Q Education of the Self 

Exploration of three areas considered 
crucial to personal adjustment and growth: 
the self-concept, relationships and 
communication, and a meaningful philosophy 
of life. Through readings and group 
discussions, it is hoped that students will 
leave the seminar with a greater 
understanding and acceptance of self and 
others. (T Gale Thompson, Associate 
Professor of Psychology) 

Sec. R The Middle East Today 

This seminar uses short-wave radios, 
American and foreign newspapers and 
journals, propaganda pieces, and other 
means of gathering information to analyze 
current political, economic, and cultural 
developments in the East Mediterranean 
region. (Burton B. Thurston, Professor of 
Middle Eastern Studies) 




Art 



Aims 

To provide a balanced background for 
students who wish to pursue advanced 
study and/or a career in art or graphic 
design; to prepare students for teaching 
or supervising art on either the 
elementary or secondary level; to 
combine art with other academic 
studies as a broad basis for liberal 
education on the college level; and to 
provide an atmosphere in which the 
student is encouraged to acquire 
standards for the evaluation, practice 
and appreciation, and application of the 
plastic arts. 

Requirements for Field 
of Concentration 

The minimum requirement for a major 
in art is 40 semester hours, including 
Art 200, four hours of drawing, two 
hours of painting, Art 201, Junior 
Seminar, and Senior Project. At least 10 
credit hours must be in art history 
courses. Departmental meetings, 
approximately two per year, are 
required of all majors, and each student 
must participate in at least one 
departmental-sponsored museum tour 
of Washington, D.C., prior to the senior 
year. Prerequisites must be observed 
unless the student can show evidence of 
equivalent training or experience. 

The Art Department reserves the right 
to retain permanently one work from 
each student in each class. Other works 
may be held temporarily for use in 
specific exhibitions and will be available 
to owners no later than one year after 
the lending date. 



53 



Only students who have completed the 
following courses or their equivalents 
will be recommended for state 
certification to teach Art: Art 105, 200, 
201, 205, 206, 210, 300, 301, 320, 325, 
478, 480, 490, 10 hours of Art History 
and eight hours in studio emphasis. See 
Education Department listings for 
required professional education courses. 

Art 105 Art Encounter 4 hours 
The exploration of the basic theories and 
techniques of major periods in art-history 
through practice and experimentation. 

Art 110 Creative Sources 4 hours 
Creative Sources: Exploration of art 
fundamentals, concepts, and procedures 
through the creative experimentation with 
materials and techniques. Emphasis on the 
"art of seeing," symbolic inference and 
alternative approaches to problem solving. 

Art 200 Introduction to Two-Dimensional 
Design 4 hours 

Basic course work in the theories and 
practice of two dimensional design; study of 
the elements and materials in relation to 
design potentials with practical applications. 
Prerequisite for all art majors. 

Art 201 Introduction to 
Three-Dimensional Design 2 hours 
Basic course work in theories and practice of 
three-dimensional design; study of the 
elements and materials in relation to design 
potentials with practical application. 

Art 205 Drawing 1 2 hours 
Concentrated activity in drawing using a 
variety of drawing media. Primary emphasis 
is placed on still life and landscape. 

Art 206 Drawing 2 2 hours 
Concentrated activity in drawing using a 
variety of drawing media. Primary emphasis 
is placed on figure drawing and portraiture. 

Art 210 Ceramics 1 2 hours 

Studio experience in forming, firing, and 

glazing pottery, including ceramic sculpture. 

Individual projects according to student's 

ability. 



Art 300 Painting 1 2 hours 
Creative exploration of the techniques of 
watercolor and acrylics, using still life, 
landscape, portraiture, and imaginative 
subject matter in a variety of styles. 

Art 301 Painting 2 2 hours 
Creative exploration of the techniques of oil 
paints and compatible media, using still life, 
landscape, portraiture, and imaginative 
subject matter in a variety of styles. 

Art 305 Drawing 3 2 hours 
Advanced problems in drawing with a 
concentration in a specific area, including 
still life, landscape, and imaginary drawing. 
Emphasis on composition. Prerequisite: Art 
205. 

Art 306 Drawing 4 2 hours 
Advanced problems in drawing with a 
concentration in a specific area, including 
figure drawing and portraiture. 
Prerequisite: Art 206. 

Art 310 Ceramics 2 2 hours 
Advanced problems in media and subject 
matter selected by the student with the 
advice of the instructor. Prerequisite: Art 
210. 

Art 320 Sculpture 1 2 hours 
Creative expression in three-dimensional 
forms. Students work with materials that 
are readily available and easily handled, such 
as wood, wire, plaster, and clay. 
Prerequisite: Art 201 or -permission, of the 
instructor. 

Art 325 Printmaking 1 4 hours 
Introduction to printmaking processes 
emphasizing creative expression through 
such techniques as relief, intaglio, 
planographic, serigraphy. Prerequisite: Art 
205 or permission of the instructor. 

Art 340 Art Activities in the 
Elementary School 4 hours 
Study of the theories and goals of art 
education in the elementary school with 
emphasis on the child's growth and 
development through art. Exploration of art 
techniques is included. 

Art 400 Painting 3 2 hours 
Advanced exploration of the aqueous media 
with an individual choice of subject matter 
and style. Prerequisite: Art 300. 

Art 401 Painting 4 2 hours 
Advanced exploration in oils and compatible 
media with an individual choice of subject 
matter and style. Prerequisite: Art 301. 




Art 420 Sculpture 2 2 hours 
Advanced problems in media and subject 
matter selected by the student with the 
advice of the instructor. Prerequisite: 
Art 320. 

Art 425 Printmaking 2 4 hours 
Advanced problems in media and subject 
matter selected by the student with the 
advice of the instructor. 
Prerequisite: Art 325. 

Art 478 Junior Seminar 2 hours 
Required of all students concentrating in the 
field. A survey of art for review and 
interpretation of the particular problems of 
this field. 

Art 480 Methods and Materials in 

Art 4 hours 

Problems in the teaching and administration 
of art programs. (May be taken for credit as 
Education 480.) 

Art 487-488 Independent Study 

2 or 4 hours each 

Art 490 Senior Project 2-8 hours 
Begins during the second semester of the 
junior year. 



54 



Graphic Design 

The following courses provide students 
interested in communications, graphics, and 
advertising with background pertinent to 
the field. An interdepartmental program can 
be developed between the Art Department 
and the Communications Department. See 
the respective department heads for 
requirements. 

Art 303 Lettering and Layout 4 hours 
Introduction to calligraphy, typography, 
letter forms, and layout, with emphasis on 
design, legibility, and creative practice. 

Art 304 Design Applications 4 hours 
Emphasis on problem solving experiences as 
related to visual communications. The 
mechanics and psychology of two- 
dimensional and three-dimensional design 
are explored as a foundation for graphic 
design. 

Art 404 Television Graphics 4 hours 
Emphasis on the design of visual symbols for 
television. Combines principles of graphic 
art with the particular requirements of 
television production. Art 303 and SOU 
recommended but not required. 

Art 405 Illustration 4 hours 
Advanced problems in advertising, book, 
and magazine illustration, with emphasis on 
procedures necessary to pictorial expression 
of ideas. Art 200 and 205 recommended but 
not required. 

Art 406 Graphic Communications Design 
Studio 4 hours 

Emphasis on professional procedures, 
structure, communication functions, and 
processes as applied to areas of graphic 
design in practical applications. 
Prerequisites: Art 303, SOU, U05 or 
permission of the instructor. 



Art History 

The following courses are surveys, intended 
to introduce students to a variety of artistic 
achievements, and the work of selected 
artists, their methods, media, and 
contributions, in the context of their time. 
The continuity of artistic development is 
stressed. 

Art 351 The Ancient World 2 hours 
Beginning with an introduction to paleolithic 
art, this course concentrates on the art of 
the Ancient Near East, Egypt, Classic 
Greece, and Rome. 

Art 352 Medieval Art 2 hours 
Continued survey, beginning with Early 
Christian and Byzantine Arts and finishing 
with Gothic Art. 

Art 353 Renaissance through Baroque 
Art 2 hours 

Concentrates on Renaissance and Baroque 
Art in Europe. Its roots and developments 
in painting, sculpture and architecture will 
be examined. 

Art 354 Western Art from 1800 to the 
Present 2 hours 
Covers such important schools and 
movements as Romanticism, the English 
landscape school, Impressionism, Cubism, 
Art Nouveau, and Surrealism. Painting, 
sculpture, and architecture are treated. 

Art 355 Asian Art History 2 hours 
Introduction to the arts of China and Japan, 
with some reference to Islamic art. 

Art 356 U.S. Art 2 hours 
Survey of the development of the arts in the 
U.S. from Colonial times to the present with 
emphasis upon the evolution of style in 
architecture, sculpture, and painting. 

Art 358 Art History Seminar 4 hours 
Deals with specific aspects of the history of 
art for individual investigation. Also includes 
methods of research. Topics for study are 
chosen by the students with the approval of 
the instructor. Involves specialized and 
selected readings in the field and individual 
and group discussions. Prerequisite: four or 
more semester hours of art history. 




Astronomy 



(See General Science 201 Astronomy) 



55 



Biology 



Aims 

To acquaint students with the living 
world around them and with basic life 
processes; to demonstrate the scientific 
method as an approach to problem 
solving; to cultivate an appreciation of 
research; to develop laboratory skill in 
various types of work in biology; to 
train students as teachers of biology 
and for certain professional work 
related to this field, and to help 
students find and appreciate their role 
in the natural environment. 

Requirements for Field 
of Concentration 

A minimum of 32 semester hours in the 
department including the Senior 
Project. A minimum of 16 semester 
hours in chemistry, including two 
semesters of organic chemistry. Eight 
hours of physics are also required. 
German or French is recommended for 
those students going on to graduate 
school. A semester of calculus is also 
strongly recommended. 

Students who plan to become 
professional biologists should consider 
the following courses: Biology 100, 101, 
201, 228, 303, 326, 338, 343, 365, 425, 
442, 467, and 490. 

Students preparing for work in 
medicine, dentistry, or as laboratory 
technicians should consider the 
following courses: Biology 100, 201, 
205, 303, 343, 367, 440, 442, 467, and 
490. 



Only students who have completed the 
following courses or their equivalents 
will be recommended for state 
certification to teach biology in the 
secondary schools: select one of the 
following: Bio. 201, 365, 442; select 
eight hours from Bio. 100, 101, 228, 338; 
required are Bio. 303, 326, 467, 480, 
Chem. 101, 102, and eight hours of 
physics. See Education Department 
listings for required professional 
education courses. A second teaching 
field is required. 

Students considering a concentration in 
biology should consult with the 
chairman of the department during the 
first semester of their freshman year. 

Bio. 100 Animal Biology 4 hours 
An examination of the phylogentic sequence 
in the animal kingdom. Emphasis is placed 
on the fundamental structures and functions 
of animals, including man. 

Bio. 101 Plant Biology 4 hours 
A study of plant life including the evolution 
of the various groups of plants. Special 
emphasis is placed on the environmental 
factors affecting the growth of plants and 
the dynamics of the cell. 

Bio. 102 Horticultural Science 2 hours 
Examination of the scientific concepts on 
which horticulture is based. Emphasis is 
placed on the study of the plant, the basis of 
all horticultural activities. 

Bio. 103 Conservation of Natural 
Resources 2 hours 
Study of the rational use of natural 
resources. Emphasis is placed on the study 
of current legislation on local, state, and 
federal levels. 

Bio. 105 First Aid as Related to the 
Principles of Biology 2 hours 
Major emphasis is placed on the biological 
principles utilized in the standard first aid 
and personal safety course of the American 
Red Cross. Red Cross certificates may be 
earned by those passing the examination. 
Opportunity for instructors' certificates will 
be presented as an option at the end of the 
course. Does not fulfill distribution 
requirements in the physical and life 
sciences. (May be taken for credit as 
Physical Education 226.) 



Bio. 167 Introduction to Mammalian 
Anatomy and Physiology 4 hours 
Mammalian anatomy as exemplified in the 
cat. Discussion and study of the functioning 
of the tissues and organ systems of the 
human body, lab study of the anatomy of the 
cat, the human physiology. Not open to 
biology majors. Prerequisite: Bio. 100. May 
be taken for credit as P.E. 167. 

Bio. 201 Comparative Vertebrate 
Anatomy 4 hours 

Comparative anatomy of the representative 
forms of vertebrates; lab study of the 
comparative anatomy of the shark, other 
lower vertebrates, and the cat. 

Bio. 205 Emergency Medical Training 

4 hours 

The medical, communication, transportation 
records, and report instructions required for 
certification by the West Virginia 
Department of Health as an emergency 
medical technician. Red Cross advanced first 
aid certificates may be earned by those 
passing the examination. Does not fulfill 
distribution requirements in the physical and 
life sciences. 

Bio. 210 Evolution 2 hours 
Evidence for the theories of evolution with 
special attention to the modern synthesis of 
genetic and ecological factors. Prerequisite: 
An elementary course in biology or 
permission of the instructor. 

Bio. 228 Field Botany 2 hours 
Introduction to the taxonomy of vascular 
plants with emphasis on the local flora, 
including the techniques of herbarium 
science. 

Bio. 231 Ornithology 2 hours 
Anatomy, behavior, and identification of 
birds. 

Bio. 303 General Genetics 4 hours 
A synthesis of basic principles and modern 
molecular theory. 

Bio. 326 Ecology 4 hours 
Study of the general principles of ecology of 
microorganisms, plants and animals. Special 
emphasis is placed on field study of several 
communities. Prerequisite: Bio. 100 and 
Bio. 101 or permission of the instructor. 



56 




Bio. 338 Advanced Botany 4 hours 
Morphology of the vascular plants plus a 
study of the fundamental life processes of 
plants: growth, irritability, nutrition, 
metabolism, and hormonal control. 

Bio. 343 Microbiology 4 hours 
Morphology and physiology of micro- 
organisms; principles of lab technique; 
cultural characteristics and environment 
influences on microbial growth. 

Bio. 365 Invertebrate Zoology and 
Parasitology 4 hours 
A functional and evolutionary study of the 
major invertebrate phyla. Special emphasis, 
particularly in the laboratory, is placed on 
the parasitic members of phyla. 

Bio. 425 Animal Physiology 4 hours 
Structure and functions of the human body; 
the mechanism of bodily movements, 
responses, reactions, and various 
physiological states. 

Bio. 440 Histology-Microtechniques 

4 hours 

Structure of the cell, its modification into 
various tissues, and the practice of general 
histological techniques. 

Bio. 442 Embryology 4 hours 
Study of the ontogenetic development of 
selected embryos. Major emphasis is on the 
vertebrates. 

Bio. 467 Cell Physiology and 
Biochemistry 4 hours 
Introduction to the structural organization 
of cells and the important aspects of cell 
physiology in the light of modern 
biochemistry and biophysics. Prerequisite: 
Chem. 211-212 or -permission of the 
instructor. 

Bio. 480 Methods and Materials in 
Teaching Physical and Life Sciences 

4 hours 

For course description see General Science 

480. (May be taken for credit as Education 

480.) 

Bio. 487-488 Independent Study 2 or 4 

hours each 

Bio. 490 Senior Project 4-8 hours 
Starts the first semester of the junior year 
and is to be completed in the spring 
semester of the senior year. 



57 



Chemistry 



Aims 

To contribute to the student's general 
knowledge and understanding of the 
nature of the physical world and his or 
her understanding of the place of 
chemistry in industrial and business 
life; to provide experience in the 
scientific method of reasoning; and to 
provide students concentrating in this 
field with a thorough and practical 
education in chemistry which may be 
useful in industrial, technical, and 
graduate work. 

Requirements for Field 
of Concentration 

A minimum of 36 hours in the 
department exclusive of the Senior 
Project. The distribution must include 
Chemistry 101, 102, 211, 212, 222, 224, 
323, 324, 402, 414, 421 plus four hours 
of electives and at least four hours of 
Senior Project; Mathematics 201, 202; 
Physics 201, 202; and at least two hours 
from the group of Computer Science 
140, 142, Physics 221, 261, 300, 
Mathematics 203, 341. Students who 
plan to do graduate work in chemistry 



58 



will demonstrate a reading knowledge 
of chemical German, French, or 
Russian. Additional courses in 
mathematics are also strongly 
recommended. All course in chemistry 
as well as the indicated courses in 
mathematics and physics must be taken 
for a letter grade. For those students 
for whom it might be advantageous, a 
program of study is offered consistent 
with the most recent standards laid 
down by the American Chemical 
Society. 

The entering freshman who is 
interested in chemistry should select 
Chemistry 101 and mathematics at the 
appropriate level. Programs for 
subsequent semesters must be decided 
in conference with the faculty advisors 
for chemistry. Students planning to 
take the MCAT are strongly advised to 
take a course in the history of the fine 
arts during their fourth or fifth 
semesters. 

Only students who have completed the 
following courses or their equivalents 
will be recommended for state 
certification to teach Chemistry in 
secondary school: Chem. 101, 102, 211, 
212, 222, Physics 201, 202, G.S. 480, 
and select six hours from the following: 
Chem. 224, 314, 323, 402, 414. See 
Education Department listings for 
required courses in Professional 
Education. A second teaching field is 
required. 

Chem. 100 Consumer Chemistry 4 hours 
(See General Science 100.) 

Chem. 101 General Chemistry and 
Inorganic Qualitative Analysis 4 hours 
Study of theoretical and descriptive 
inorganic chemistry. The lab work is 
primarily a study of the principles and 
practice of a systematic qualitative scheme 
of analysis for the cations and anions. 
Prerequisites: two units of mathematics or 
concurrently with Math. 103. Three lectures 
and three hours of lab per week. 

Chem. 102 General Chemistry 4 hours 
Continuation of the lecture portion of Chem. 
101. Study of solubility and acid-base 
phenomena in aqueous systems with 
appropriate lab work. Prerequisite: Chem. 
101. 



Chem. 211-212 Organic Chemistry 

4 hours each 

Introduction to the study of the organic 
compounds of carbon, both aliphatic and 
aromatic, involving a considerable amount of 
the electronic mechanisms of organic 
reactions. Lab work consists largely of 
organic preparations. Prerequisites: Chem. 
101, 102. Three lectures and three hours of lab 
per week. 

Chem. 222 Chemical Thermodynamics 

2 hours 

Introduction to the concepts and 
experimental techniques of classical 
thermodynamics with special emphasis on 
the concepts of enthalpy, entropy, and free 
energy. Prerequisites: Chem. 102; Math. 202 
or permission of the instructor. 

Chem. 224 Introduction to Chemical 
Spectroscopy 2 hours 
Study of the different energy states of 
atoms and molecules; the statistical 
principles governing the distribution of 
particles within these states; and the 
transitions between states. Prerequisites: 
Chem. 102; Math. 202 or permission of the 
instructor. 

Chem. 311 Bonding and Symmetry in 
Organic Chemistry 2 hours 
Introduction to group theory and simple 
molecular orbital calculations as they apply 
to organic chemistry and to the spectra of 
organic compounds. Emphasis is placed on 
problem solving and structural 
determinations from spectroscopic data. 
Prerequisites: Chem. 212; Chem. 22U or 
permission of the instructor. 



Chem. 314 Introduction to Biochemistry 

2 hours 

Study of the chemistry of some of the more 
important biological processes with 
emphasis on reaction mechanisms and 
methods of elucidation. Prerequisite: 
Chem. 212. 

Chem. 323 Kinetics and Solutions 

2 hours 

Study of rate processes, especially in the 

liquid phase. Prerequisite: Chem. 222. 

Chem. 324 Electrochemistry 4 hours 
Study of oxidation-reduction and phenomena 
associated with solutions of electrolytes, 
application of these principles including 
classical electrochemical analysis, and the 
measurement of basic physical parameters. 
Prerequisite: Chem. 222. 

Chem. 325 Chemical Instrumentation 

2 hours 

The theory and practice of selected methods 
in chemical instrumentation. Special 
emphasis will be placed on those methods 
not covered in other courses and on methods 
helpful for completion of Senior Projects. 
Prerequisites: Chem. 222, Chem. 22k- 

Chem. 402 Advanced Inorganic 
Chemistry 2 hours 
Chemistry of certain elements and their 
compounds is studied and interpreted on the 
basis of modern theories of atomic and 
molecular structure. The necessary 
foundation in quantum mechanics is 
reviewed. Prerequisites: Chem. 222, 22k. 



Chem. 411 Physical Organic Chemistry 

2 hours 

Study of the theories and techniques 
relating structure and properties of organic 
compounds. Prerequisites: Chem. 212; Chem. 
222 or permission of the instructor. 

Chem. 414 Advanced Organic Chemistry 

2 hours 

Study of selected advanced topics in organic 
chemistry including reaction mechanisms. 
Lab is introduced, where appropriate, and 
stresses the use of instrumentation. 
Prerequisites: Chem. 212; Chem. 222 or 
permission of the instructor. 

Chem. 421 Chemistry of the Condensed 
Phases 2 hours 

Study of special problems associated with 
the liquid and solid states. Prerequisite: 
Chem. 222. 

Chem. 430 Special Topics 2 hours each 
Series of three courses devoted to the 
consideration of advanced topics and areas 
of special interest in the fields of Inorganic 
Chemistry (430-A), Organic Chemistry 
(430-B), and Physical Chemistry (430-C). 
Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 

Chem. 477-478 Seminar in Chemistry 

2 hours 

Presentation of current research topics by 

students, faculty and visiting lecturers. 

Chem. 480 Methods and Materials in 

Teaching Physical & Life 

Sciences 4 hours 

For course description see General Science 

480. (May be taken for credit as Education 

480.) 



Chem. 487-488 
4 hours each 



Independent Study 2 or 



Chem. 490 Senior Project 4-8 hours 
During the junior year the chemistry major 
is introduced to the methods of employing 
the chemical literature, selects a topic for 
advanced investigation, and makes a 
literature search of background material as 
a basis for an in-depth study in this area. 
There is one class meeting each week for 
both semesters. Following this preliminary 
work, an investigation of a significant topic 
in chemistry is made by each senior under 
the direction of a faculty member in the 
department. This work culminates in a 
written and oral report at the end of the 
senior year. Fee: $20. 




59 




Communications 



Aims 

To develop students' abilities to analyze 
and understand the role of 
communication in our daily lives and 
the functions and effects of mass 
communications in society; to develop 
requisite personal skills for effective 
oral and written communication; to 
provide theoretical and practical 



60 



preparation for students seeking 
careers in radio, television, newspaper, 
magazine and book publishing, public 
relations and advertising. 

Requirements for Field 
of Concentration 

Communications 101, 201, 204, 206, 
209, 210; either 303 or 310, 403, 478; a 
Senior Project, at least one semester's 
work on a campus publication, Cable 3, 
or WVBC-FM; and a departmental- 
approved internship in the mass media, 
advertising or public relations. 
Normally students will take 101 and 206 
in their first year; 201, 209 and 210 



in their second year; 403 in the third or 
fourth year; and 478 in the fourth year. 
Twelve hours in English and/or 
literature courses in the Foreign 
Language Department are also 
required, as is proficiency in reading a 
foreign language at the 200 level. 
Cours.es in marketing, statistics, 
psychology, and art are recommended. 



Students seeking careers in 
Commercial Art or Television Graphics 
may take advantage of the 
interdepartmental program developed 
between the Communications 
Department and the Art Department. 
See the respective department heads 
for requirements. 

Students must have achieved at least 
sophomore standing for enrollment in 
any of the 300- and UOO-level courses in 
the department. 

Comm. 101 Introduction to Mass 

Communications 4 hours 

History and theory of mass communications. 

Role of newspapers, magazines, radio, 

television, books, movies, and adjunct 

agencies in modern society. Effects on 

audiences. 

Comm. 106 Interpersonal 
Communication: Voice and 
Diction 2 hours 

Introduction to effective use of the voice and 
the body in interpersonal and public 
communication. Voice mechanics include 
breathing, posture, articulation, projection, 
pitch and tempo. Use of the body covers eye 
contact, facial expression, gestures and 
movement. Attention to the individual needs 
and to the use of linguistics dialects suitable 
for different occasions. 

Comm. 201 Beginning Reporting 

4 hours 

Study and practice of basic journalistic 
writing skills, including grammar and 
sentence construction as they relate to news 
writing. Basic reporting skills will be 
emphasized. In addition to both in-class and 
out-of-class writing assignments, students 
will be required to write for the campus 
newspaper. Prerequisite: Passing 
journalism section of WQT. 



Comm. 204 Copy Editing and 

Layout 4 hours 

Principles and practice in editing copy for 

publications; includes typography, layout, 

design of letterpress and offset newspapers, 

and use of computers. Prerequisite: Comm. 

201. 

Comm. 206 Interpersonal 
Communication: Speech 4 hours 
Introduction to the dynamics of 
communication: levels of interaction 
between speaker and listener. Developing 
the use of voice and non-verbal signals; 
understanding oral style in language and 
logical argument in public speaking. Focus 
on the design and delivery of short speeches 
and on critical listening. (May be taken for 
credit as Theatre 206.) 

Comm. 207 Interpersonal 
Communication: Theory and 
Practice 4 hours 

Introduction to verbal and nonverbal 
interaction in dyads and small groups. 
Examination of perception, self-concept, 
awareness, use of language, listening and 
feedback as they affect oral communication. 
Practice and analysis of interpersonal skills. 

Comm. 209 Broadcasting and Society 

2 hours 

History of U.S. broadcasting. Concentration 
on public issues and the effect of electronic 
media on other basic institutions of society. 
Contributions and criticisms of radio and 
TV. Functions of the FCC. 

Comm. 210 Beginning Broadcast News 
Reporting 2 hours 
A lecture-laboratory course designed to 
involve students in the reporting/writing 
process as it relates to the electronic media. 
Attention on basic reporting skills and news 
judgment as related to radio, television and 
cable news. Prerequisite: Comm. 201. 

Comm. 220-J Caribbean Journalism 

2 hours 

Study of the mass media and their impact 
economically, socially, politically, religiously, 
and educationally on the various Caribbean 
groups. The course deals with the media in 
the Virgin Islands, Puerto Rico, Cuba, Haiti, 
Dominican Republic, and the Caribbean 
Commonwealth nations. January term only. 



Comm. 281 TV Programming 2 hours 
Historical development. Current trends and 
practices, program designs, and audience 

analysis. 

Comm. 288 TV Production 2 hours 
Lecture/lab designed to acquaint students 
with the tools, elements and techniques of 
TV production. Students serve as floor 
managers, camera operators, audio/visual 
technicians and directors. 

Comm. 301 Principles of Advertising 

4 hours 

Study of history, philosophies and principles 

of advertising. Media, markets and 

merchandising. Role and evaluation of 

advertising. Stress on copy writing and 

layout. 

Comm. 302 Principles of Public 
Relations 4 hours 
Contributions and criticisms of public 
relations. History, philosophies, trends, 
principles, Case studies of institutional 
programs. Preparation of a creative project 
such as a trade journal. 

Comm. 303 Advanced Reporting 

2 hours 

Emphasis on in-depth news reporting. 
Attention to public affairs reporting. 
Feature writing, as it relates to magazines, 
will be studied. Students will write for 
campus media. Prerequisite: Comm. 201. 



61 



Comm. 304 Laws of Communications 

2 hours 

Treatment of national and state 
constitutional and legislative laws and court 
decisions regarding freedom and 
responsibility of the print and electronic 
media, advertising and public relations. 
Principles and case studies of libel, privacy, 
privilege, copyright, and contempt. Social 
responsibility of the media. 

Comm. 306 American Magazines 2 hours 
Role and contributions of U.S. magazines, 
historically and currently. Trends in writing 
style, editing, production, layout, 
advertising, promotion, reader research, and 
circulation. Practice in writing three articles 
for a professional journal and general 
circulation magazines. 

Comm. 307 Interpersonal 
Communication: Oral 
Interpretation 2 hours 
Development of voice and nonverbal skills to 
interpret prose, poetry and dramatic 
literature in oral presentation. Techniques 
for platform and microphone. Projects will 
demonstrate facility in transmitting 
meaning for public performance. (May be 
taken for credit as Theatre 307.) 

Comm. 310 Advanced Broadcast News 
Reporting 2 hours 

A lecture-laboratory course dealing with the 
complexities of the electronic news 
gathering process. Emphasis on the use of 
state-of-the-art technology and its affects on 
news content and story organization. Field 
trip:' to local stations and guest speakers 
from the media. Students will be required to 
gather and report news using the technology 
associated with radio, television and cable. 
Prerequisite: Comm. 210. 



62 



Comm. 335 School Publications 2 hours 
Practical course in which class members do 
reporting, editing, and layout work. 
Editorial and design problems of high 
school, college yearbooks, catalogs, and 
literary journals are also considered with 
school periodicals as examination pieces. 

Comm. 365 Audio-Visual Education 

2 hours 

(See Education 365.) 

Comm. 366 Educational and Public 
Broadcasting-I 2 hours 
Survey of the development and current 
trends in noncommercial radio and 
television. Emphasis is placed on the 
Carnegie Commission, legislative action, 
structure, funding, programming, and 
regulation. Lecture, discussion, field trips. 

Comm. 367 Educational and Public 
Broadcasting-II (Continuation of Comm. 

366) 2 hours 

Additional emphasis on instructional TV and 
international systems in industrialized 
countries and Third World countries. 
Students will be required to do in-depth 
historical research over an area or trend 
covered in Part I and II. Research, 
discussion, lecture, field trips. 

Comm. 377 The Performing Arts in 
Radio and TV 2 hours 
Studio course utilizing specific exercises 
designed to develop individual style in 
camera and microphone techniques. Useful 
to all students of the performing arts as well 
as those desiring a career in radio and/or TV 
announcing, acting, and singing. 

Comm. 378 Audio Production 2 hours 
Lecture and lab course designed to acquaint 
the student with basic techniques of audio 
production. The course employs both 
classroom discussions and practical projects 
in the WVBC radio studios. Emphasis is on 
techniques applicable to use of sound in 
radio, television, cinema, and theatre. 

Comm. 382 Broadcast Station 
Management Problems 2 hours 
Legal aspects. Economic and operational 
factors. Developing local talent. Personnel, 
budgetary, promotional, and other problems. 
Prerequisite: Comm. 209. 

Comm. 383 Advertising Writing for 
Radio and TV 2 hours 
Theory and practice in preparing advertising 
copy for local, regional, and national radio 
and TV. Audience evaluation, research, and 
planning campaigns. Construction of 10, 20, 
30, and 60-second ads. 



Comm. 389 Writing for Electronic 
Media 2 hours 

Writing of dramas and documentaries. 
Interviews, research, and study of the 
contribution of dramas and documentaries to 
American cultural patterns. Prerequisites: 
Comm. 209 and 210 in addition to sophomore 
standing. 

Comm. 401 History of American 
Journalism 4 hours 
History of newspapers, magazines, radio, 
television, and books in the United States. 

Comm. 402 Public Opinion 4 hours 
The nature and significance of public 
opinion. Includes studies of public opinion 
formation and measurement, the roles of 
news media, advertising, censorship, 
propaganda, political indoctrination, and 
other factors. 

Comm. 403 Reading and Research in the 
Foreign Press 2 or 4 hours 
Selected readings, content analysis, and 
other research in periodicals of one foreign 
language. (May be taken for credit as 
Foreign Language 403.) Prerequisites: 
Junior or senior standing and completion of 
a 200-level course or equivalent in a foreign 
language. 

Comm. 404 Advanced Advertising 

2 hours 

Study of principles of writing and layout for 
a sustained campaign. Preparation of a 
campaign for a product and/or service of a 
profit or non-profit institution. 

Comm. 405 Advanced Public Relations 

2 hours 

Study of principles of writing and layout for 
an institutional magazine or newsletter. 
Preparation of a periodical for a profit or 
non-profit institution. 

Comm. 478 Senior Seminar 4 hours 
Overview of the history, theory and ethics of 
communications. Review of media writing 
skills. Survey of professional opportunities 
and entrance procedures. 

Comm. 487-488 Independent Study 2 or 

4 hours each 

Comm. 490 Senior Project 2-8 hours 



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Computer 
Science 

Aims 

To help students 1) recognize problems 
that can be solved with the aid of a 
computer; 2) write structured programs 
in a reasonable amount of time that 
work correctly, are well documented, 
and readable; 3) determine whether or 
not they have written an efficient and 
well organized program; 4) assess the 
implications of work performed either 
as an individual or as a member of a 
team; 5) understand basic computer 
architectures; 6) understand how the 



process of modern operating systems 
cooperate and compete with each other 
as they perform their functions. To 
prepare students to 7) pursue in-depth 
training in one or more application 
areas of computer science; 8) further 
their education in computer science; 
9) gain employment in some computer 
related capacity. 

Requirements for Field of 
Concentration 

I. Computer Science 179, 180, 280, 310, 
330, 350, 370, 478, and 490 

II. Twelve hours of computer science 
courses numbered 300 or above 

III. Mathematics 201, 202, 281, and 354 

CS 100 Computers and Society 2 hours 
The impact of computers and computer 
systems on society is studied. Current topics 
such as the following are covered: the 



impact of computers on employment; 
automation and the labor force; overview of 
computer applications in government, 
medicine, education, etc. ; social issues - 
ethics, information banks, privacy and the 
Freedom of Information Act, computer 
abuses; the future - a cashless society and 
computers in the home. 

CS 140 BASIC Programming 2 hours 
A survey and discussion of computers, 
flowchart and programming for applications 
using the BASIC language. The course is 
directed towards the general student 
without an extensive mathematical 
background. Emphasis is placed on real-life 
examples and programming small-scale 
computers. 



63 



CS 142 FORTRAN Programming 2 hours 
A study of basic FORTRAN programming 
techniques for the science and engineering 
student. 

CS 144 COBOL Programming 2 hours 
A study of basic COBOL programming 
techniques for the business student. 

CS 179 Introduction to Computer Science 

2 hours 

A first course for computer science majors 
emphasizing concepts and programming 
assignments. The emphasis of the course is 
on techniques of algorithm development and 
structured programming. 

CS 180 Introduction to Programming 
(PASCAL) 2 hours 
Organization and characteristics of 
computers. Survey of computers, languages, 
systems and applications. Computer solution 
of numerical and non-numerical problems 
using the PASCAL Programming language. 
Prerequisite: CS 179. 

CS 200 Computer Applications in the 
Social Sciences 2 hours 
A study of computer techniques applied to 
social and behavioral sciences. Topics include 
language selections, matrix manipulation, 
statistics (basic), analysis of variance, 
correlations and regression, econometrics, 
and profit analysis packages. 



CS 222 Digital Electronics 4 hours 
An introduction to digital electronics with 
applications in instrumentation and 
computer electronics. Topics include Boolean 
Algebra, basic gates, logic families, 
encoders-decoders, astable /monostable 
multivibrators, flip-flops, counters, readouts, 
shift registers, bi-directional bus structure, 
serial-parallel /parallel -serial data 
conversion, D to A and A to D conversion. 
Prerequisite: Math 103 or equivalent or 
permission of the head of the department. 

CS 280 Assembly Language 4 hours 
A study of assembly language programming 
methods. Topics include computer 
organization, assembly process, assembly 
coding, addressing, binary arithmetic, 
storage allocation, character and bit 
manipulation, and debugging techniques. 
Prerequisite: CS 179, 180. 

CS 310 Discrete Structures 4 hours 
Fundamental algebraic, logical, and 
combinational concepts of computer science. 
Topics include graph theory, monoeds and 
finite automata, lattices and Boolean 
algebras. 

CS 330 Computer Organization 4 hours 
Application of Boolean algebra to 
combinational circuit design problems. 
Organization of simplified computer 
components. Adders, arithmetic and logical 
units, memory organization. Architecture 
and physical realization of computer 
systems. Prerequisite: CS 180. 

CS 350 Data Structures 4 hours 
Basic data concepts and their 
representation. Linear lists, strings and 
string processing, algorithms, and arrays. 
Storage allocation and representation of 
arrays. Storage systems and structure, and 
storage allocation and collection. 
Prerequisite: CS 179 and CS 180. 

CS 370 Operating Systems 4 hours 
Batch processing systems. Implementation 
techniques for parallel processing of input/ 
output and interrupt handling. Memory 
management, system accounting, 
interprocess communication and interfaces, 
and deadlocks. Prerequisite: CS 280. 

CS 390 Numerical Analysis 4 hours 
Numerical methods in evaluating integrals 
and differential equations. Techniques in 
finding the roots of polynomials and solving 
systems of linear equations and matrix 
manipulation. Prerequisite: CS 1U2, and 
Math 201, 202. 



CS 410 Computer Simulation 2 hours 
Simulation methodology including 
generation of random numbers and variates, 
analysis of data generated by simulation 
experiments, and validation of simulation 
models. Introduction to queuing theory. 
Selected simulation applications. 
Prerequisite: CS 350 and Math 281 or 
Math 383. 

CS 420 Systems Analysis 2 hours 
Students are introduced to basic concepts of 
system specification design, system 
implementation, and project management. 

CS 430 Micro/Miniprocessors 2 hours 
A study of microprocessors, 
microcomputers, and their applications; 
topics include microprocessor hardware, 
microcomputer organization, software, 
microcomputer programming, interface 
techniques, and trend of development. 
Prerequisite: CS 280. 

CS 440 Data Communication 2 hours 
Data based systems, data communication 
systems. Topics include the role of the data 
base, communication techniques, common 
carrier implications, tariffs, exchanges, 
concentrators, multiplexors, buffering, 
network analysis, cost and design. 
Prerequisite: CS 350. 

CS 450 Data Base Concepts 2 hours 
Introduction to the concept of data base. 
Topics include historic development of data 
bases, data organization and structure, data 
security, recovery, relationship, and 
retrieval, system design, comparison of data 
base approach with traditional file 
organization and access methods. 
Prerequisite: CS 350. 

CS 478 Senior Seminar 2 hours 
Current topics in computer science. 

CS 487/8 Independent Study 2 or 4 hours 

CS 490 Senior Project 2-8 hours 



64 




Economics 
& Business 



Aims 

To help students understand how man's 
struggle to provide for his needs and 
wants in a world of limited resources is 
related to all of man's problems: 
personal, social, political, and spiritual; 
to provide knowledge and develop 
proficiency in the application of 
analytical tools to the problems of 
society and business. The courses 
offered serve as preparation for work in 
business, government, law, 
environmental planning, and graduate 
study. 

Requirements for Field 
of Concentration 

Minimum of 30 hours exclusive of the 
Senior Project. The following courses 
are required: 200, 241, 246, 301, 302, 
477. Outside the department, Math 201, 
281 and 282 are required and should be 
completed by the beginning of the 
junior year. In addition, students will 
elect to take 12 hours in one of the 
following areas: Accounting: (Econ. 
261, 262, 271, 272) Finance: (Econ. 311, 
316, 325) Business: (Econ. 230, 280, 
290, 300, 341) Economics: (Econ. 316, 
341, 360). 



65 



A student may elect to develop his or 
her own course pattern consisting of 12 
hours of courses to replace one of the 
above areas of study. In such cases, 
prior consent must be obtained from 
the head of the department. Students 
concentrating in Economics and 
Business are expected to attain a 
minimum grade of "C" in all courses in 
the department. If a student receives a 
grade lower than a "C," the student 
must arrange an interview with the 
head of the department prior to taking 
additional upper-level courses. All 
courses numbered 246 and above have 
prerequisites. 

Students considering economics and 
business as a field of concentration 
should complete by the end of the 
sophomore year: Econ. 200, Econ. 241, 
Math. 201, and Math. 281. 

Econ. 101 Personal Finance 4 hours 
Objectives of this course are to develop an 
understanding of the concepts needed for 
intelligent consumer decision-making. 
Concentration on budget policies, 
borrowing, installment buying, marketing 
techniques, and consumer purchases in the 
areas of food, clothing, automobiles, 
housing, social insurance, personal 
insurance, pension programs, investment 
markets, and estate building. (Not 
recommended for students with a field of 
concentration in Economics and Business.) 



66 



Econ. Ill Introduction to Business 

2 hours 

Structure, procedures, and objectives of the 
business system; economic and social 
environments of business; role of business in 
our culture. 

Econ. 200 Principles of Economics 

4 hours 

Introduction to the inevitable problems 
associated with scarcity. Alternative 
methods of settling economic questions, with 
special emphasis placed on the functioning of 
the market system. Pricing, output 
determination, monopoly power, wage 
controls, and price fixing in relation to 
contemporary issues. The student is also 
introduced to problems of money and 
banking, growth, the labor movement, and 
business operations. Students will read 
broadly from non-technical literature as well 
as conventional text materials. 

Econ. 230 Business Law 4 hours 
Introduction to the nature and development 
of law, the legal aspects of contracts and 
other business instruments as set forth in 
the Uniform Commercial Code, and some 
aspects of partnerships and corporations. 

Econ. 241 Principles of Accounting I 

4 hours 

Introduction to basic accounting and 
business transactions; cash record and 
control; periodic adjustments of transactions 
data; financial statement presentation, 
payroll accounting; accounting and reporting 
principles of partnerships, corporations, 
branches, and departments. 

Econ. 246 Principles of Accounting II 

4 hours 

Basic cost accounting principles including 
job cost and process cost systems; 
interpretation of financial statements; 
control of manufacturing costs through 
budgeting; flow of funds; and tax 
considerations in business decisions. 
Prerequisite: Econ. 241. 

Econ. 261 Intermediate Accounting I 

4 hours 

Intensive review of adjusting and closing 
entries. The use of work sheets in the 
preparation of statements. Comprehensive 
study of all corporation accounts. 
Prerequisites: Econ. 241, 246. 

Econ. 262 Intermediate Accounting II 

4 hours 

Critical study of the principles governing the 
valuation of assets and the application to 
balance sheet problems of the concept of 
matching revenues and costs. Prerequisite: 
Econ. 261. 



Econ. 271 Cost Accounting 4 hours 
Basic concepts and techniques of industrial 
accounting; historical and standard costs; 
budgeting; management use of cost 
accounting information. Prerequisites: Econ. 
241, 246. 

Econ. 272 Auditing 4 hours 
Basic concepts of standards of auditing; 
audit procedures and working papers; 
internal and external audit reports. 
Prerequisites: Econ. 261, 262. 

Econ. 280 Management 4 hours 
Study of the management process; 
organizing, staffing, decision-making, 
concepts of control, operating objectives, 
group dynamics; analysis of cases for study 
of managerial activities. A seminar course. 
Prerequisite: Econ. 200. 

Econ. 285 Quantitative Methods 4 hours 
An introduction to some of the quantitative 
techniques which today are playing an 
increasing role in decision making by 
management. 

Econ. 286 Personnel Management 

4 hours 

An examination of personnel management 
as a dynamic network of processes, systems, 
and conditions that affect all organizations 
and the people in them. In particular, the 
course treats extensive application of theory, 
research, and practice to job design, 
staffing, training and development, 
appraisal compensations, leadership, 
organizational justice, and collective 
bargaining. 

Econ. 287 Organizations and Human 
Behavior 4 hours 

This course seeks to improve effectiveness 
of organizations by strengthening human 
processes. It explores specific aspects of 
organizational culture such as motivation, 
conflict, power, and leadership; exercises 
and simulations are emphasized. (May be 
taken for credit as Psych. 287.) 



Econ. 290 Principles of Marketing 

4 hours 

Marketing function of the manufacturer, 
wholesaler, jobber, retailer, mail order- 
house, chain store and other marketing 
institutions; cost of distribution; problems of 
marketing management and planning; and 
modern trends in marketing. Prerequisite: 
Econ. 200. 

Econ. 300 Business and Society 4 hours 
Interface of business with government and 
society; management action in situations 
involving significant political and social 
factors; the changing role of business. Open 
only to juniors and seniors. 

Econ. 301-302 Intermediate Economic 
Theory 4 hours each 
Advanced survey of the elements theory 
primarily for students concentrating in 
economics. First semester: resource 
allocation, price determination, output 
determination, and income distribution 
under various market conditions. Second 
semester: a study of national income and 
employment determination, inflation growth 
and economic stability, interwoven with 
mathematical analysis and model building. 
Designed to introduce the student to the 
techniques of differential and integral 
calculus, linear equations, matrix algebra, 
and statistics as applied to the above 
analysis. Prerequisites: Econ. 200 and Math 
201, 281. 

Econ. 311 Business Finance 4 hours 
Study of corporate organization and the 
planning of financial requirements. Intensive 
study of cash flow, budgeting, capital 
decisions, internal financing, and corporate 
reorganization. Prerequisites: Econ. 200, 
2^1, Math 281. ' 




Econ. 316 Money, Banking, and Fiscal 
Policy 4 hours 

Various money markets; the operation of 
commercial banks, Federal Reserve System, 
and the Treasury Department including an 
analysis of tax revenues, expenditures, and 
debt-financing. Prerequisites: Econ. 200, 
241. 

Econ. 325 Investment Management 

4 hours 

Critical study of the various types of 
investment instruments and the relative 
merits of each, investing procedures, 
security analysis, security ratings, portfolio 
theories, and portfolio analysis. 
Prerequisites: Econ. 200, 241, Math 281. 

Econ. 341 Labor 4 hours 
General course in labor economics, with an 
emphasis on trade unionism; history and 
objectives of organized labor; employment 
and wage theory; managerial labor policies; 
collective bargaining; current social, 
economic and political aspects of labor 
management relations; and labor law. 
Prerequisite: Econ. 200. 

Econ. 360 International Trade 4 hours 
Principles of international trade and finance 
and their application to the modern world; 
theory of comparative advantage; exchange 
rates, monetary standards, tariffs, quotas, 
and commercial policy; capital movements; 
aid to less developed countries; geographic 
origin and direction of trade routes and 
products. Prerequisite: Econ. 200. 



Econ. 399 Junior Seminar 2 or 4 hours 
Opportunity for interested students and 
faculty to explore some aspect of economics 
or business not covered in the curriculum. 
Topics have been: The Modern Left and the 
Establishment, Government Regulation, 
Public Finance, Quantitative Procedures in 
Management Science, and Data Processing 
in Modern Business. Students must be 
prepared for advanced work. 

Econ. 477 Senior Seminar 2 hours 
A capstone course integrating the student's 
background, experiences and previous 
business and economics curriculum through 
case studies and simulation exercises. 

Econ. 487-488 Independent Study 2 or 4 

hours each 

Econ. 490 Senior Project 2-8 hours 
Open only to students with a field of 
concentration in the department. 
Preparation of the senior project and its 
presentation. Time will also be devoted to 
review for the senior comprehensives. The 
topic for the senior project must be selected 
before the end of the junior year and be 
approved by the head of the department. 



67 




Education 



Aims 

To develop a teacher who is a self- 
directing decision maker who 
recognizes the need for personal and 
professional growth, has the skills 
necessary to pursue it, and is secure 
enough to engage in personal and 
professional self -evaluation. 

To develop a teacher who recognizes the 
needs of young persons and is able to 
utilize both the liberal arts background 
and principles of teaching in attempting 
to meet those needs today. The teacher 
also analyzes emerging trends and 
thinks critically about them in an 
attempt to arrive at a more human 
balance between the teacher's needs 
and the student's needs. 

To develop a teacher who has the skill 
and willingness to communicate, in the 
deepest sense of the word, with people 
of all ages and backgrounds. 

In summary, the teacher is a perceptive 
and aware person who can utilize 
intellectual skills and knowledge to 
think critically and pursue self -directed 
goals. 

Requirements for Teacher 
Education 

A student preparing for elementary, 
middle childhood or secondary school 
teaching must plan to complete: (1) the 
requirements for graduation described 
on page 40, (2) a selection of courses 
providing appropriate background for 
teaching in a particular field, and (3) a 
sequence of professional education 
courses and experiences designed to 
give a broad understanding of concepts 
and skills in teaching. Bethany is 
accredited by the National Council for 



Accreditation of Teacher Education 
(NCATE) and is a party to the 
interstate compact for reciprocity in 
certification by the preparation of 
students for certification in the State of 
West Virginia. 

To become eligible for teacher 
certification, the student must complete 
a college and state-approved program. 
It is the student's responsibility to seek 
appropriate counseling from the 
Education Department, preferably 
early in the freshman year, and to 
become familiar with all of the 
requirements. 



The department recognizes abilities 
which students may already have in a 
given subject matter area and assists 
them in planning their program 
accordingly. Waivers or advanced 
standing granted by the College can be 
noted on official transcripts so that 
courses from which a student is 
exempted may be applied toward 
certification. 

Leadership of children and youth 
groups, e.g., summer camps, scouts, 
church school, playground supervision, 
etc., is strongly recommended. 

A period of observation and 
participation in a school is an important 
and integral part of the education 
curriculum. Education students are 
encouraged to consider observation and 



participation in an educational agency 
when planning their intercultural 
and/or citizenship practicum. 

Students enrolling for courses involving 
observation and teaching in schools 
must abide by dress and appearance 
standards of any school to which they 
are assigned. 

Elementary Education 

Students preparing to teach in 
elementary schools will follow the 
sequence of required education courses 
listed below. Required courses cannot 
be taken Credit-No Credit. 



Elementary Education 

First Semester 



Credit 



Second Semester 



Credit 



Freshman 








Psych. 100 General Psychology 


4 


None 




Sophomore 




Ed. 202 Human Development and Learning II 


4 


Ed. 201 Human Development and Learning I 


4 


E d . 242 Principles and Curriculum of the Public School 
(Application for Teacher Education due April 2) 


2 



Junior 

Ed. 345 



Methods and Content in Elementary and 
Middle Childhood I: Mathematics 



Ed. 342 Children's Literature 

Ed. 346 Methods and Content in Elementary and 
Middle Childhood II: Language Arts 

Ed. 348 Professional Practicum: Elementary 

(Application for Student Teaching due March 29) 



4 

2 



Senior Professional Block 

Ed. 333 Educational Psychology 2 

Ed. 401 History and Philosophy of Education 2 

Ed. 447 Methods and Content in Elementary and 

Middle Childhood III : Science 2 

Ed. 448 Methods and Content in Elementary and 

Middle Childhood IV: Social Studies 2 

Ed. 470 Observation and Directed Teaching 8 

No Other Courses Permitted 



Ed. 340 Teaching Reading in the Middle and 
Secondary School 

Ed. 490 Senior Project 



4 
2-8 



69 




A student interested in pursuing a 
course of study leading to certification 
should contact a faculty member in the 
Department of Education early in the 
freshman year. A Guide to Teacher 
Education, available in the Education 
Department Office, gives a full 
description of all programs. 

In order to meet certification 
requirements, a student must complete 
the following courses, in addition to the 
professional education courses: Art 340; 
Mathematics 225, 226 (must be 
completed by the end of the sophomore 
year); Music 110, 481; Physical 
Education 227, 481; General Science 
202; six additional hours of science 
(both biological and physical) selected 
from a variety of approved courses; 
History 201, 202, 225; Economics 200; 
Psychology 100. A course in literature 
must also be selected. Many of the 
courses above will satisfy the 



distribution requirements of the 
College. (See Page 41.) A specialization 
may be added for Middle Childhood. 
See the Guide for Requirements. 

Each student is responsible for 
planning a program to meet the specific 
requirements for certification. The 
program should be planned in 
consultation with the Education 
Department. 

Middle Childhood Education 

Students preparing to teach in middle 
childhood settings (Middle Schools and 
Junior High Schools) will follow the 
sequence of courses listed below. 
Required courses cannot be taken 
Credit-No Credit. 



Middle Childhood Education 

First Semester 



Credit 



Second Semester 



Credit 



Freshman 








Psych. 100 General Psychology 


4 


None 




Sophomore 




Ed. 202 Human Development and Learning II 


4 


Ed. 201 Human Development and Learning I 


4 


Ed. 242 Principles and Curriculum of the Public School 
(Application for Teacher Education due April 2) 


2 



Junior 

Appropriate methods courses for Middle Childhood 



E d . 347 Professional Practicum : Middle Childhood 
(Application for Student Teaching due March 29) 



Senior Professional Block 



(see secondary) 



Ed. 340 Teaching of Reading in the Middle Childhood 

and Secondary Schools 4 

Ed. 490 Senior Project 2-8 



70 



Students preparing to teach at the 
middle childhood level should discuss 
their program with the Head of the 
Education Department. Two teaching 
fields are required for a degree in 
education and certification in West 
Virginia. Middle Childhood certification 
may be added to elementary or 
secondary certification with the 
advisement and permission of the 
Education Department. A Guide to 
Teacher Education gives a full 
description of all programs leading to 
certification in West Virginia. The 
Guide is available in the Education 
Department. 

Each student is responsible for 
planning a program for meeting 
certification requirements. 




Secondary Education 

Students preparing to teach in 
secondary schools are expected to 
follow the sequence of required 
education courses listed below. General 
distribution and other requirements for 
graduation, and the student's field of 
concentration, must be added. The 
required education courses cannot be 
taken Credit-No Credit. 

Students preparing to teach at the 
secondary level should discuss their 
program with the Head of the 
Education Department, as well as the 
person responsible for the Teacher 
Education Program in the major field. 
A second teaching field is required in 
most areas. A Guide to Teacher 
Education gives the full description of 



Secondary Education 

First Semester 



Credit 



Second Semester 



Credit 



Freshman 




None 




Psych. 100 General Psychology 
(Prerequisite for Ed. 333) 


4 






Sophomore 




Ed. 202 Human Development and Learning II 


4 


None 




Ed. 242 Principles and Curriculum of the Public School 
(Application for Teacher Education due April 2) 


2 



Junior 

None 



Ed. 349 Professional Practicum: Secondary 

Ed. 340 Teaching Reading in the Middle Childhood 
and Secondary Schools 

Ed. 480 (or others) 480 Methods and Materials in 

Teaching* 
Meetings scheduled by Ed. Dept. as needed 

(Application for Student Teaching due March 20) 



2-4 



Senior Professional Block 

Ed. 333 Educational Psychology 

Ed. 401 History and Philosophy of Education 

Ed. 428 Principles and Techniques of Secondary 
Education 

Ed. 470 Observation and Directed Teaching 



2 
2 

4 
8 



'Some departments offer these courses only first semester or in alternate years. 



71 



all programs leading to certification in 
West Virginia. The Guide is available in 
the Education Department. 

Students preparing for a career in 
teaching at the secondary level must 
have completed the following: a course 
in Mathematics or the completion of 
three and one-half years of 
mathematics in high school; a course in 
literature (a course in literature of a 
foreign language may be counted); and 
a course in Fine Arts (Art, Music, 
Theatre, or Fine Arts). The courses 
above may be selected to satisfy the 
distribution requirements of the 
College. (See Page 41.) 

Each student is responsible for 
planning a program to meet 
certification requirements. This 
program must be approved by the head 
of the Education Department in each 
subject field within which he or she is 
preparing to teach. 

Admission to Teacher 
Education 

Students interested in preparing to 
teach are urged to consult a member of 
the Education Department individually 
as soon as possible for counseling with 
respect to prospects for employment in 
various teaching fields, course 
requirements, and state certification 
requirements. 

During the second semester of the 
sophomore year, written application for 
admission to the elementary, middle 



72 



childhood or secondary teacher 
education program should be submitted 
to the Education Department on forms 
obtained from the department. 
Students applying for elementary 
education must have been enrolled in 
Education 201, 202, 242. Students 
applying for middle childhood education 
must have been enrolled in Education 
201, 202, 242. Students applying for 
secondary education must have been 
enrolled in Education 202 and 242. 

Applications are appraised by the 
Teacher Education Committee with 
respect to academic achievement, 
emotional and physical fitness, 
personality traits, and other factors the 
committee considers essential to a 
teaching career. The committee may: 
(1) recommend full or conditional 
approval; (2) suggest programs to 
overcome certain deficiencies, or, in 
some cases; (3) recommend that the 
student not prepare for teaching. A 
complete description of the procedures 
may be found in the Guide. 

A "C" average must be attained in all 
academic work and in all professional 
education courses for admission. All 
committee recommendations for 
approval are based on this condition. 

The committee may review a student's 
qualifications at any time and issue 
appropriate recommendations. The 
general qualifications of all students are 
reviewed at the time they apply for 
student teaching. Forms, procedures 
and dates may be found in the Guide. 

Professional Block 

Each student in teacher education takes 
a designated group of professional 
courses, including student teaching, 
during the first semester of the senior 
year. This is known as the Professional 
Block. Requirements for admission to 
the block are as follows: 

Prerequisites - Admission to teacher 
education and for Elementary 
Education: Psychology 100 and 
Education 201, 202, 242, 345, 346, and 
348; for Middle Childhood Psychology 
100 and Education 201, 202, 242, 347, 
and applied methods as appropriate; 



and for Secondary Education: 
Psychology 100 and Education 202, 242 
and 349, and adequate background for 
student teaching in one or more subject 
fields as approved by the academic 
departments) concerned. Prerequisites 
cannot be deferred until after the 
Professional Block or taken at another 
institution without written permission 
from the Education Department. 

Scholarship Requirements — By West 
Virginia state law, a student in 
Elementary Education must have not 
less than a "C" average in all college 
work and a "C" average in professional 
(education) courses taken prior to the 
time he or she is admitted to the block; 
a student in Middle Childhood or 
Secondary Education must have not 
less than a "C" average in all college 
work, a "C" average in his or her field(s) 
or specialization, and a "C" average in 
professional (education) courses, 
including methods courses offered by 
other departments, taken prior to the 
block. 

Application for Student Teaching — 

Students are required to make 
application for student teaching during 
the second semester of the junior year, 
on forms provided by the Education 
Department. This application requests 
the recommendation of the students' 
senior Education Department advisor, 
if Elementary or Middle Childhood, or 
the academic department head or 
advisor if secondary, and requires the 
approval of the head of the Education 
Department. Applications cannot be 
approved for students not previously 
admitted to Teacher Education. Forms, 
procedures and dates may be found in 
the Guide. 




Competency-Based Professional 
Block — Student teaching is conducted 
for the entire first semester of the 
senior year in area schools or off- 
campus centers. Related course work is 
integrated with student teaching to 
provide direct application to field 
experience. Students assigned to off- 
campus centers may need to live in the 
community where the center is located. 
The College will assist in locating 
housing if desired, and with other 
details of the arrangement. 

Students are not permitted to schedule 
courses in conflict with the block during 
the semester they are enrolled in it, or 
carry extra-curricular activities which 
interfere with the requirements 
imposed by the block. Arrangements 
can usually be made for practice and 
participation in varsity sports. Any 
exceptions to the above must be 
approved by the head of the department 
concerned and by the Dean of the 



Faculty. Students should not register 
for other than the prescribed 
Professional Block courses without 
written permission from the Education 
Department. 

Bilingual-Bicultural Teacher 
Education — Bethany College, through 
the combined efforts of the Education 
Department and the Foreign Language 
Department, offers preparation for 
those students who might wish to teach 
young people whose first language is 
Spanish. While West Virginia does not 
offer certification in this area, many 
states do and a student completing the 
Bilingual-Bicultural sequence of courses 
would meet the requirements of most 
states. Students interested in this 
program should contact the Head of the 
Education Department and the Head of 
the Foreign Language Department for 
details regarding the program. 

Certification 

Near the end of the senior year, each 
student should initiate application 
procedures for certification in the state 
where he or she expects to teach. 

Applications require the 
recommendation of the head of the 
Education Department. To be 
recommended, a student must meet - 
in addition to certification requirements 
of the state for which he or she is 
applying - the following qualifications: 
(1) successful student teaching 
experience; (2) completion of an 
approved teacher education program; 
(3) completion of the undergraduate or 
graduate program examinations 
(including both the field and education 
tests for secondary) during the senior 
year, as arranged by the Education 
Department; (4) eligibility for 
graduation; and (5) evidence of personal 
traits and character conducive to 
success as a teacher. 

Ed. 201 Human Development and 
Learning 4 hours 

Individual and group development from 
infancy to adolescence. Observation and first 
hand contacts with children are included. 
Educational programs are considered in 
terms of the total child development. 
Freshmen not admitted- 



Ed. 202 Human Development and 
Learning II 4 hours 
Individual and group development from 
adolescence through the young adult 
periods. Applications are made in relation to 
learning theory, self understanding, and 
preparation for working with young people. 
Freshmen not admitted. 

Ed. 205 Teaching the Young Exceptional 
Child: An Overview 2 hours 
An examination of the major handicapping 
conditions associated with the school age 
child. Participants will explore methods of 
identification diagnoses and teaching toward 
academic and personal goals within the 
regular classroom. 

Ed. 206 Individualization: A Wholistic 
Approach 2 hours 
Primary consideration is given to the 
mainstreamed handicapped student. The 
design and implementation of an 
individualized program for academic and 
personal growth studied. Teacher and child 
are viewed as part of a larger, ecosystem. 
Instructor's permission required. 

Ed. 220 Educational Alternatives and 
American Youth 2 hours 
The study of educational alternatives within 
and outside of the traditional school 
structure focusing on a more personalized 
consideration of the effects of various 
educational experiences on young people. 

Ed. 242 Principles and Curriculum of the 
Public School 2 hours 
Introductory course in which students 
explore the goals of education and their 
implementation; the role of the teacher and 
professional concerns while applying the 
concepts of human development. 



73 



Ed. 275 Student Development in Higher 
Education 

Study of the philosophy of higher education 
and the development of the individual 
student within the college environment. 
Emphasis is placed upon personal growth, 
communication skills, group dynamics, and 
residence hall programming. Didactic and 
experiential learning in the areas of 
personal, academic, and vocational 
counseling is included. (May be taken for 
credit as Psychology 275.) Enrollment 
limited to Resident Advisors. 

Ed. 328 Human Sexuality 2 hours 
(See Psychology 328.) 

Ed. 333 Educational Psychology 2 

hours 

(See Psychology 333.) 

Ed. 340 Teaching Reading in the Middle 
Childhood and Secondary School 4 hours 
This course will focus on diagnostic and 
prescriptive teaching techniques. Both the 
corrective techniques for the remedial 
reader and the higher order cognitive skills 
will be included. In addition to classwork 
this course includes two hours weekly of 
tutoring of middle school, secondary, or 
college students who have been 
recommended by their advisors for help in 
reading. (May be taken for credit as English 
482.) 



Ed. 342 Children's Literature 2 hours 
Includes background of the history of 
literature for children; familiarity with 
established and current literature in this 
area; critical analysis skills; methods and 
techniques of using literature; work with 
children. 

Ed. 343 Literature and Adolescence 

2 hours 

(See English 290.) 

Ed. 344 Teaching Skills 
Laboratory Non-credit 
Study and practice of specific teaching skills 
related to the technical and media areas of 
education. Students must complete the 
required work prior to student teaching. 
Information related to the course work is 
available from the Education Department 
office. Elementary and secondary. 

Ed. 345 Methods and Content in 
Elementary and Middle Childhood I: 
Mathematics 4 hours 
Practical application of arithmetical skills, 
including the understanding of fundamental 
processes; comparison of different 
philosophies in teaching arithmetic; the 
elements of modern math; and the 
theoretical and practical application of the 
metric system at all levels of the curriculum. 
Classroom experience in public schools. 
Prerequisite: Math 225 or permission of the 
instructor. 

Ed. 346 Methods and Content in 
Elementary and Middle Childhood II: 
Language Arts 4 hours 
Emphasis on teaching the skills of reading, 
listening, speaking, and writing as they 
relate to the total curriculum. Emphasis on 
teaching of reading and the integration of 
the related areas in language arts. Students 
are expected to demonstrate competence in 
appropriate audio-visual aids. Classroom 
experience in public schools. 

Ed. 347 Professional Practicum: Middle 
Childhood 2 hours 

Preparation of the prospective teacher for a 
professional role as observer and participant 
in the classroom at the elementary level. 

Ed. 348 Professional Practicum: 

Elementary 2 hours 

Preparation of the prospective teacher for a 

professional role as observer and participant 

in the classroom at the middle childhood 

level. 



Ed. 349 Professional Practicum: 
Secondary 2 hours 

Preparation of the prospective teacher for a 
professional role as observer and participant 
in the classroom at the secondary level. 

Ed. 350 Reading: Diagnosis and 
Prescription 2 hours 
This is a methods course which deals with 
reading disabilities within the content areas. 
Format will include diagnosis of specific 
problems and their origins as well as 
prescription for correction and remediation. 
Those enrolled in the course will participate 
in laboratory situations to tutor disabled 
readers. (To be taken following or 
concurrent with Ed. 340 or Ed. 346.) 

Ed. 355 Mathematics: Diagnosis and 
Prescription 2 hours 
This is a methods course which deals with 
corrective and remedial situations in 
mathematics. Format will include diagnosis 
of specific problems and their origins as well 
as prescription for correction and 
remediation. Those enrolled in the course 
will participate in laboratory situations to 
tutor students with problems in 
mathematics. (To be taken following or 
concurrent with Ed. 345.) 

Ed. 365 Audio-Visual 
Education 2 hours 
Emphasis on basic media equipment 
operation and production techniques 
common to classroom instruction, 
communications, and business. Includes class 
and individual projects to acquaint students 
with the media field, and a self-instructional 
lab for equipment skill development. (May be 
taken for credit as Communications 365.) 

Ed. 401 History and Philosophy of 
Education 2 hours 

Development of modern education in social, 
historical, and philosophical perspective, 
emphasizing backgrounds of present 
practices, current problems, and issues. 
Current practice is analyzed in terms of 
philosophic rationale and applications are 
made to the school situation. 



74 






urn!!! 3,wm 




Ed. 428 Principles and Techniques of 
Secondary Education 4 hours 
Aims, functions, and curriculum 
organization of middle, junior high, and 
senior high schools. Basic strategies, 
materials, and techniques, including 
evaluation applicable to teaching, are 
integrated with a full semester of student 
teaching in schools. Certification and 
employment procedures, professional 
practices, and continuing education are also 
considered. 

Ed. 447 Methods and Content in 
Elementary and Middle Childhood III: 
Science 2 hours 

Understanding of the concepts of the 
sciences approached through various 
methods, including unit study, inquiry, 
experimentation, and the process approach. 
Practical application in school situation. 



Ed. 448 Methods and Content in 
Elementary and Middle Childhood IV: 
Social Studies 2 hours 
Understanding of the concepts of social 
studies approached through various 
methods, including unit study, inquiry 
experimentation, and the process approach. 
Practical application in school situations. 

Ed. 470 Observation and Directed 
Teaching 8 hours 

Directed full-semester observation and 
student teaching in schools with partial 
assignments in appropriate grade levels; to 
include weekly student teaching seminars 
and a minimum of 150 clock hours actual 
teaching. Students must make applications 
for student teaching prior to advance 
registration. Other course or activities which 
might interfere with student teaching are 
not permitted. Concurrent with enrollment 
in the Education Block. 

Ed. 480 Methods and Materials in 
Teaching 2 or 4 hours 
See courses numbered 480 offered by Art, 
Biology, Chemistry, English, Foreign 
Languages, General Science, Mathematics, 
Music, Physical Education, Physics, 
Psychology, Social Sciences, and Theatre. 
Also see auxiliary methods courses, i.e. Art 
340, Music 480, 481, and 482, Physical 
Education 480 and 481, required in some 
programs. May include observation and 
participation in secondary schools. 
Experiences in production and utilization of 
appropriate audio-visual materials and 
equipment. 



Ed. 481 Methods of Teaching Basic 
Skills - Middle Childhood 
Education 2 hours 

A guided syntheses of the specific content 
and methods related to the Basic Skills 
Program. An awareness of the various 
application of skills across interdisciplinary 
lines will be developed with recognition 
given to a student's individual and 
educational needs. 

Ed. 482 Methods and Materials in 
Bilingual-Bicultural Education 2 hours 
(See Foreign Language 482.) 

Ed. 484 Methods of Teaching English as 
a Foreign Language 2 hours 
(See English 484.) 



Ed. 487-488 
2 or 4 hours 



Independent Study 
Ed. 490 Senior Project 2-8 hours 



75 




English 



Aims 

To help students to develop and 
maintain the ability to write clear and 
effective English; to guide them toward 
an increased understanding and critical 
appreciation of their literary heritage; 
to help prepare them for graduate and 
professional study. In addition, the 
department provides programs that 
prepare students for certification as 
teachers of English and Language Arts. 

Requirements for Field of 
Concentration 

1. Concentration in English requires a 
minimum of 32 hours in the 
department, exclusive of the Senior 
Project. The following courses are 
required: 140 or 150, 325-326, 330, 
341-342, 477. Students should also elect 
at least one Seminar in British 
Literature (courses numbered 420-429), 
and at least one Seminar in American 
Literature (courses numbered 450-459). 
These seminars, together with other 
advanced courses or independent study, 
will extend the student's knowledge of 
one or two areas of literature, provide 
background for the Senior Project, and 
help to prepare for future study or a 
career. Thus, the program of a student 
preparing for the law or another 
profession will be different from that of 
a student preparing for graduate study 
in English or for secondary school 
teaching. 

2. At least 12 hours in another 
department must be included in the 
field of concentration. These courses 
may be related to the student's special 
interests or vocational plans. 

3. Students planning to attend graduate 
or professional schools should prepare 
to meet foreign language reading 
requirements. 



4. Each student must take the 
Comprehensive Examination in 
English. The examination has three 
parts: the Undergraduate Record 
Examination in Literature, an essay 
examination, and an oral examination. 

5. Students are not accepted for 
concentration in English later than the 
beginning of their fifth semester unless 
they have completed English 140 (or 
150) and either English 325-326 or 
English 341-342. 

6. Students concentrating in English 
are expected to attain a minimum grade 
of C in all courses in the department. 

7. Only students who have completed 
the following courses or their 
equivalents will be recommended for 
certification to teach English in 
secondary school: Eng. 140, 210, 
325-326, 341-342, 370, 375; Comm. 335, 
Th. 220, Eng. 290 or Ed. 343, Eng. 480 
or Ed. 480; two courses from Eng. 
100-109, 125, 150, 213, 217, 490, or 

Th. 202; two courses from Eng. 261, 
262, 263, 264, 280-289, 330, 350, 
420-429, 440-449, 450-459, 477, or 
Eng./Th. 270, 273, 274, or Th. 401-410; 
one course from Eng./F.L. 240, 257, 
258. A second teaching field also is 
required. Students interested in 
teaching should consult the Education 
Department listings for required 
courses in Professional Education. 



Writing Proficiency 
Program 

The Writing Proficiency Program is 
administered by the department. 
Students should complete the program 
and meet the writing proficiency 
requirement for graduation before the 
beginning of the senior year. Details of 
the requirement may be found on page 
42. 

Writing tests are given according to the 
following schedule: 

November 

Writing Qualification Test: Freshmen 
(Required) 

February 

Diagnostic Qualification Test: All 
students entering in February 

April 

Writing Qualification Test: Sophomores 
(Advisory) and Juniors (Required) 

The following courses may be taken in 
partial fulfillment of the writing 
proficiency requirement or to prepare 
for the Writing Qualification Tests: 
Eng. 101-109, 120, 125, 140, 150, 205, 
210, 213, 351. Each of these courses is 
described below. 

Eng. 101-109 College 
Composition 2 hours each 
Training and practice in writing clear and 
effective expository prose. Emphasis is on 
the role of persona, point-of-view, audience, 
organization, and style in informal and 
formal writing in relation to specific subject 
matter. Instruction in methods of research 
and documentation is also included. (May not 
be taken on a credit/no credit basis.) 

All courses in the 101-109 series are basic 
writing courses (neither remedial nor 
advanced). The courses share a common 
approach to the teaching of effective writing 
skills, but those writing skills are tested and 
honed against a variety of topics. Students 
may take more than one course for this 
series. 

Eng. 101 Short Fiction 2 hours 

Eng. 102 Appalachian Heritage 2 hours 

Eng. 103 Fiction Flannery O'Connor 

2 hours 



Eng. 120 Expository Writing Non-credit 
Training and practice in writing clear and 
effective expository prose with emphasis 
upon the needs of individual students. 
Required of all students whose performance 
on the third (Junior) Writing Qualification 
Test is not satisfactory. 

Eng. 125 Expository Writing 
Workshop 2 hours 

Training and practice in writing clear and 
effective expository prose. After an initial 
diagnosis, an individual program is designed 
for each student. Offered as a substitute for 
English 101-109 and an alternative to 
English 120. (May not be taken on a credit- 
no credit basis.) 

Eng. 140 Introduction to 
Literature 4 hours 

Introduction to the study of poetry, drama, 
and fiction. Emphasis is on the development 
of techniques for the analysis and evaluation 
of poetry, drama, and fiction and on the 
writing of literary essays. Open to all 
students. Required for concentration in 
English. 

Eng. 145 Introduction to Dramatic 
Literature 4 hours 
(See Theatre 145.) 



77 




78 



Eng. 150 Honors Freshman 
English 4 hours 

A course for freshmen of superior ability 
and accomplishment. Introduction to the 
principles of critical reading and writing and 
to the analysis and evaluation of poetry, 
drama, and fiction. Intensive practice in 
expository and imaginative writing with 
emphasis upon the achievement of clarity 
and accuracy. May be substituted for Eng. 
U0 to fulfill requirement for concentration 
in English and prerequisites for English 
courses. Enrollment by invitation only. 

Eng. 205 Writing for Business and 
Industry 2 hours 
Writing formal and informal reports, 
summaries, business letters, job 
descriptions, applications and resumes. Each 
student will complete approximately 10 
writing assignments. Prerequisite: English 
101-109 or demonstrated competence in 
expository writing. 

Eng. 210 Creative Writing 2 hours 
Training and practice in the creative aspects 
of expository and imaginative writing. 
Students write essays, sketches, short 
fiction, poems, and dramatic scenes. 
Prerequisite: English 101-109 or its 
equivalent. Required for students preparing 
to teach secondary school English. 
Enrollment limited to 15 students with 
preference given to Juniors and Seniors. 

Eng. 213 Advanced Expository Writing 

2 hours 

Intensive practice in writing expository 
prose with emphasis upon the achievement 
of literary excellence. Enrollment limited to 
15 students with preference given to juniors 
and seniors. Prerequisite: English 101-109 or 
the equivalent. 

Eng. 217 Imaginative Writing 2 hours 
Intensive practice in writing fiction, poetry, 
or plays with emphasis upon the 
achievement of literary excellence. 
Individual assignments and frequent 
conferences. Enrollment limited to 12 
students with preference given to Juniors 
and Seniors. Prerequisites: Eng. U0 or 210 
and permission of the instructor. (May be 
taken for credit as Theatre 202.) 

Eng. 240-241 Myth, Legends, and 
Romances 2 hours each 
Study of myths, legends and romances from 
the Western Tradition. Among other things, 
students will read selected myths, legends, 
and epics from Greece and Rome, Beowulf 
tales from the Arthur cycle, and selected 
romances. 240 - Greek and Roman. 241 - 
Middle Ages and Renaissance. 



Eng. 250 Twentieth Century British 
Poetry 2 hours 

Study of the writing of a selected group of 
important British poets published in this 
century. Emphasis is on ideas, themes, and 
techniques of the poets studied, as well as on 
their life and times. Poets studied are T S. 
Eliot, W. H. Auden and W. B. Yeats. 

Eng. 251 Twentieth Century American 
Poetry 2 hours 

Study of the writing of a selected group of 
important American poets active in the 
twentieth century. Emphasis is on the ideas, 
themes, and techniques of the poets studied 
and on the interplay of tradition and 
innovation in twentieth century poetry. 
Poets studied are John Crowe Ransom, Hart 
Crane, and William Carlos Williams. 

Eng. 255-256 Great Plays 2 hours each 
Study of masterpieces of the drama in 
Europe from the beginnings to the present. 
Plays are read in modern English 
translations. (May be taken for credit as 
Foreign Language 255-256 or Theatre 
255-256.) 

Eng. 257-258 Great Novels 2 hours each 
Study of masterpieces of the novel in 
Europe from the beginnings to the present. 
Novels are read in modern English 
translations. (May be taken for credit as 
Foreign Language 257-258.) 

Eng. 261-262 British Novel 2 hours each 
Development of the British novel from the 
18th century to the present. 261: Defoe 
through Dickens. 262: Hardy to the present. 

Eng. 263-264 American Novel 

2 hours each 

Development of the American novel from 
the 19th century to the present. 263: 
Beginnings through World War I. 264: 1920s 
to the present. 



Eng. 270 Shakespeare 4 hours 
Rapid reading of the major plays with 
emphasis upon Shakespeare's themes, 
motifs, language, and characterization. (May 
be taken for credit as Theatre 270.) 

Eng. 273 British Drama to 1901 2 hours 
Development of drama in the British Isles 
from the Middle Ages through the Victorian 
period. (May be taken for credit as 
Theatre 273.) 

Eng. 274 British and American Drama in 
the Twentieth Century 2 hours 
Development of British and American drama 
since the beginning of the twentieth century. 
(May be taken for credit as Theatre 274.) 

Eng. 280-289 Colloquium in Literature 

2 or 4 hours each 

Courses for the discussion of special topics 
in literature. Enrollment in each course 
limited to 20 students. 

Eng. 282 Women Poets 2 or 4 hours 
Study of poetry written by women in 
Europe, England and America, beginning 
with the work of Sappho and concluding 
with poets of the present century. Emphasis 
will be placed on the work of 19th and 20th 
century poets. 

Eng. 284 Introduction to Film 4 hours 
In this course, students will study the film as 
a technical artifact, an art object, a mirror of 
society, and a moral statement. They will see 
twelve classic films such as Chaplin's City 
Lights, Resnais's Hiroshima Mon Amour, 
Bergman's Virgin Spring, and Hitchcock's 
Psycho. Fee: $15. 

Eng. 285 Meditative Poetry 4 hours 
A study of poets such as Donne, Herbert, 
the minor metaphysicals, Hopkins, Eliot, 
Merton, and Rilke as they demonstrate the 
major trends in Western and Eastern 
meditation. Some attention will be given to 
mysticism. (May be taken for credit as 
R.S. 285.) 



Eng. 286 Cosmic Warfare 4 hours 
Study of some presentations of the struggle 
between good and evil in epics of the past 
and in modern novels. Reading will include 
Beowulf, Paradise Lost, and selections from 
the work of C. S. Lewis, J. R. R. Tolkien, 
and Charles Williams. (May be taken for 
credit as R.S. 286.) 

Eng. 287 Modern Women Writers 

2 or 4 hours 

A study of the feminine imagination as 
manifested in the works of Austen, Chopin, 
Woolf, Dickinson, Sexton, Bishop, Hellman, 
and others. Some attention will be given to 
feminist theory. 

Eng. 290 Literature and 
Adolescence 2 hours 

Study of important works about or of special 
interest to young people of junior high 
school through high school age. Techniques 
of presenting the works are considered. 
Readings are primarily in short stories and 
novels. Required for students preparing to 
teach secondary school English. (May be 
taken for credit as Ed. 343.) 

Eng. 325-326 British Literature 

4 hours each 

Development of British literature from the 
beginning through the Victorian Period. 
First semester: from Beowulf through 
Milton. Second semester: from the 
Restoration to the end of the 19th century. 
Prerequisite: Eng. UO or permission of the 
instructor. Required for concentration in 
English. 

Eng. 330 Twentieth Century British 
Literature 2 hours 
Study of important works of British 
literature during this century. Writers to be 
included: Eliot, Yeats, Auden, Woolf, Joyce, 
and Pinter. Prerequisite: Eng. U0. Required 
for concentration in English. 

Eng. 341-342 American Literature 

4 hours each 

Development of American literature from 
the Colonial Period to the present with 
emphasis upon the writers of the 19th and 
20th centuries. Prerequisite: Eng. U0 or 
permission of the instructor. 

Eng. 351 Literary Criticism 4 hours 
Study of the history of literary criticism, 
literary theory, and applied approaches to 
literary criticism. Special emphasis will be 
placed on the preparation of essays which 
apply various theories and demonstrate 
various critical points of view. 



Eng. 370 Development of Modern 
English 4 hours 

History of the English language from Anglo- 
Saxon to modern English with emphasis 
upon the structure and vocabulary of the 
latter. Not open to Freshmen. Required for 
students preparing to teach secondary school 
English. 

Eng. 375 English Grammar 2 hours 
The description and analysis of the grammar 
of the English language. Various 
grammatical systems are considered, such as 
the traditional, the structural, and the 
transformational-generative. Required for 
students preparing to teach secondary school 
English. 

Eng. 420-429 Seminar in Major 
Authors 2 hours each 
Advanced study of one or more major 
British, American, or European authors. 
Prerequisite: previous study of the author or 
authors in a survey course. Enrollment in 
each course limited to 12 students. 

Eng. 420 The Novels of Dickens 2 hours 
Study of selected novels of Charles Dickens 
and their importance as literary and social 
documents. 

Eng. 440-449 Seminar in British 
Literature 2 or 4 hours each 
Advanced study of a period, movement, or 
tradition in British literature. Prerequisite: 
previous study of the period, movement, or 
tradition in a survey course. Enrollment in 
each course limited to 12 students. 



79 



Eng. 444 Age of Johnson 4 hours 
Study of the major prose, poetry, and drama 
of the mid-eighteenth century with emphasis 
upon the work of Samuel Johnson and the 
members of his circle, including Boswell, 
Goldsmith, and others. 

Eng. 445 Romantic Poets 4 hours 
Close examination of the work of 
Wordsworth, Coleridge, Keats, Shelley, 
Byron and some of their contemporaries. 

Eng. 450-459 Seminar in American 
Literature 2 or 4 hours each 
Advanced study of a period, movement, or 
tradition in American literature. 
Prerequisite: previous study of the period, 
movement, or tradition in a survey course. 
Enrollment in each course limited to 12 
students. 

Eng. 455 Realism 4 hours 
A study of the Realist movement in the late 
nineteenth century America. Emphasis is on 
the critical statements and fictional works of 
the major realists, such as Mark Twain, 
Henry James, and William Dean Howells. 
Attention is given to the influence of 
European realism and of American 
regionalism and local color. The emergence 
of naturalism is considered. 

Eng. 457 Hawthorne, James, and 
Faulkner 4 hours 

A study of critical and fictional works of 
Hawthorne, James, and Faulkner. Emphasis 
is on ideas, themes, and techniques. 

Eng. 458 The Plays of Eugene O'Neill 

2 hours 

Study of selected representative plays of 
Eugene O'Neill. Emphasis is on the 
characteristic themes and techniques and on 
the development of O'Neill as an author. 
Offered Spring 1981. 

Eng. 477 English Seminar 2 hours 
Reading and research designed to help 
students review and organize their 
knowledge of literature. Prerequisites: 
English UO or 150, 325-826, 330, 3hl-3U2 or 
permission of the instructor. 




Eng. 480 Methods of Teaching English 

2 hours 

Teaching of high school composition and 
literature. Literary analysis, systems of 
grammar, and reading improvement. (May 
be taken for credit as Education 480.) 

Eng. 482 Teaching Reading in the 
Middle and Secondary School 2 hours 
(See Education 340.) 

Eng. 484 Methods of Teaching English 
as a Foreign Language 2 hours 
Directed study of techniques for teaching 
English vocabulary, spelling, and grammar 
to native speakers of other languages. 
Practical experience through tutoring. (May 
be taken for credit as Education 484.) 
Offered upon request. 

Eng. 487-488 Independent Study 

2 or 4 hours each 

Individual study in any area of English for 
which the student is qualified. Independent 
study is offered only in areas not included in 
other courses in the department. 
Prerequisites: Adequate preparation to 
undertake the study as determined by the 
instructor; permission of the head of the 
department. 

Eng. 490 Senior Project 2 or 3 hours 
Generally consists of a major critical paper 
on a topic developed from at least one of the 
student's elective courses in the department. 
During the junior year, the student should 
determine an area of interest and make a 
preliminary investigation of it after 
consulting with his or her mentor (the 
faculty member best qualified to assist in the 
project). Reading and research should 
continue during the student's senior year, 
and much of the final semester should be 
devoted to preparation of the paper. 
Sometimes, the project may take other 
forms. Students wishing to undertake an 
unusual project must consult with the head of 
the department no later than the beginning 
of the fourth semester. Credit for the senior 
project is not included in the total number of 
hours required for concentration in English. 



80 



Fine Arts 





Aims 

The Fine Arts Department is not a 
separate faculty; it draws upon the 
faculties and curricula of the 
Department of Art, Communications, 
Music, Philosophy, and Theatre. Its 
aims are to give expression to the 
aesthetic unity of the various forms and 
modes of art, and to permit students to 
pursue a non-professional interest in 
these fields. 

Requirements for Field of 
Concentration 

All students concentrating in Fine Arts 
must take Fine Arts 201-202; Art 200; 
Theatre 255-256, 273 or 274; Music 110; 
Philosophy 358; Fine Arts 477; and a 
Senior Project. In addition, at least six 
courses must be elected from at least 
two of the following categories, with an 
emphasis (four courses) in one of the 
categories. 

1. Art: advanced art studio and art 
history courses 

2. Music: music theory and music 
literature courses 

3. Communications: basic speech 
courses 

4. Theatre: advanced theatre courses 



■■**>, 



81 



Students electing this field of 
concentration would normally be 
expected to participate in performance 
and practice activities provided through 
extracurricular programs, especially in 
their area of emphasis. 

Students primarily interested in art or 
music should also consult the sections of 
this catalog dealing with fields of 
concentration in those departments. 

F.A. 201-202 Introduction to the Arts 

4 hours each 

Introduction to the elements of the graphic 
and plastic arts and music and to the 
organization of these elements in works of 
art through the examination of 
representative master works of western art 
from all ages. Consideration is also given to 
aesthetic functions and values. The sequence 
is chronological, the first semester 
extending to the mid-18th century, the 
second, from that point to the present. 

F.A. 416 The Lyric Stage 2 hours 
This course is designed to introduce the 
general student to operatic techniques and 
conventions. The principle emphasis will be 
on the ways in which music enhances 
dramatic elements in operas of Mozart and 
Verdi. No technical knowledge of music is 
required. 

F.A. 477 Seminar 2 hours 
Review of the fine arts area concentrating 
upon the student's field of emphasis, largely 
in preparation for the senior comprehensive 
examination. Required of all seniors in the 
fine arts field. 



F.A. 487-488 
2-4 hours 



Independent Study 



F.A. 490 Senior Project 2 hours 
Independent, student-initiated project which 
may be either research or creative work. 



82 




Foreign 
Language 



Aims 

To familiarize students with the 
language and literature of the French, 
German, and Spanish speaking peoples; 
to help students understand a culture 
other than their own; and to assist 
students in preparing for careers 
requiring foreign language skills. The 
program also provides students 
interested in research with a reading 
knowledge of a foreign language, and it 
helps travelers to foreign countries 
acquire basic conversation skills. 

Requirements for Field of 
Concentration in French, 
German, or Spanish 

A minimum of 24 hours in the target 
language (not including French 101-102, 
German 101-102, or Spanish 101-102) 
plus Foreign Language 425, and a 
Senior Project. 

A working knowledge of a foreign 
language other than the one chosen as 
the field of concentration is 
recommended. Every student is 
required to spend a minimum of one 
semester studying in a country where 
his or her major foreign language is 
spoken. Students expecting to teach a 
foreign language must complete 
Foreign Language 480 and the 
appropriate civilization and survey of 
literature courses. 



Foreign Language majors should 
consider a strong second field in an area 
related to career goals. 

Only students who have completed the 
following courses or their equivalents 
will be recommended for state 
certification to teach French, German 
or Spanish in secondary school. French 
- major: Fr. 101, 102, 200, either 300 or 
301, 313, either 351 or 352, F.L. 425, 
480 and any other four hours in French. 
Second field: Fr. 101, 102, 200, either 
300 or 301, either 351 or 352, F.L. 480 
and any other four hours of French. 
German - major: Ger. 101, 102, 200, 
either 300 or 301, 312, 351 or 352. F.L. 
425, 480 and any other four hours in 
German. Second field: Ger. 101, 102, 
200, either 300 or 301, 351 or 352. F.L. 
480 and any other four hours of 
German. Spanish - major: Sp. 101, 102, 
200, either 300 or 301, 351 or 352, 310 
or 311, F.L. 425, 480 and any other six 
hours of Spanish. Second field: Sp. 101, 
102, 200, either 300 or 301, 351 or 352, 
F.L. 480 and any other four hours in 
Spanish. See the Education 
Department listings for required 
Professional Education courses. A 
second teaching field is required. 

French 

Fr. 101 Basic French I 4 hours 
Fundamentals of grammar, pronunciation, 
and composition. Emphasis on audio-oral 
approach to develop basic skills of 
comprehension, speaking, writing, and 
reading. One hour of lab per week in 
addition to four hours of classroom work. 
Intended primarily for students who have no 
acquaintance with the language. 

Fr. 102 Basic French II 4 hours 
Continuation of French 101. Prerequisite: Fr. 
101 or equivalent. 

Fr. 200 Intermediate French 4 hours 
Continuation of Fr. 102, with an introduction 
to culture and literature. One hour of lab per 
week in addition to four hours of classroom 
work. Prerequisite: Fr. 102 or equivalent. 

Fr. 300 Conversation and Composition: 
The Living Language 4 hours 
French and American life styles are 
compared through discussions, skits, and 
compositions designed to improve the 



student's communication skills in French. 
Topics center around the school, home life, 
and interpersonal relationships. A feature of 
this course is participation in the weekly 
meeting of the French Club at the dinner 
hour. Prerequisite: Fr. 200 or equivalent. 

Fr. 301 Conversation and Composition: 
Modern France 4 hours 
While improving skills of spoken and written 
communications in French, the student 
becomes acquainted with the nature and 
concerns of modern France. A feature of 
this course is participation in the weekly 
meeting of the French Club at the dinner 
hour. Prerequisite: Fr. 200 or equivalent. 

Fr. 313 French Civilization 4 hours 
Introduction to France and its culture, with 
special attention to its history, literature, 
theatre, art, and music. Readings and 
discussions in English. 

Fr. 351 Survey of French Literature I 

4 hours 

Survey of French literature from the earliest 
periods to the end of the 18th century. 
Readings in French from an anthology and 
certain reference works. Conducted in 
French. Prerequisite: Fr. 200 or equivalent. 

Fr. 352 Survey of French Literature II 

4 hours 

Survey of French literature of the 19th and 
20th centuries. Introduction to explication 
de texte techniques. Readings in French from 
an anthology and certain reference works. 
Conducted in French. Prerequisite: Fr. 200 
or equivalent. 

Fr. 400 Advanced French Grammar 

2 hours 

To facilitate correctness in writing and 
speaking, the grammatical structure of the 
French language is examined. Prerequisite: 
Fr. 200 or equivalent. 



83 



Literary Studies 

Seminars highlighting major literary 
movements and genres from France's 
past and present. 

Fr. 411 19th Century Novel 2 hours 
French romanticism, realism, and 
naturalism are examined through the works 
of such novelists as Hugo, Stendhal, 
Flaubert, Balzac, and Zola. Conducted in 
French. Prerequisite: A good reading 
knowledge of French. Fr. 351 or 352 is 
recommended. 

Fr. 412 Contemporary Novel 2 hours 
Study of the development of 20th century 
French fiction, from Proust and Gide to the 
New Novel. Conducted in French. 
Prerequisite: A good reading knowledge of 
French. Fr. 351 or 352 is recommended. 

Fr. 413 Philosophers of the French 
Enlightenment 2 hours 
Examination of representative works by 
major 18th century French thinkers, 
including Montesquieu, Voltaire, Diderot, 
and Rousseau. Conducted in French. 
Prerequisite: A good reading knowledge of 
French. Fr. 351 or 352 is recommended. 

Fr. 414 French Existentialism in 

Literature 2 hours 

Study of France's existentialists, including 

Sartre, Camus, and de Beauvoir. Conducted 

in French. Prerequisite: A good reading 

knowledge of French. Fr.. 351 or 352 is 

recommended. 



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Fr. 415 17th Century Classical Theatre 

2 hours 

Study of the great classical dramatists of 

France: Corneille, Moliere, and Racine. 

Conducted in French. Prerequisite: A good 

reading knowledge of French. Fr. 351 or 352 

recommended. 

Fr. 416 Poetry: From Romanticism to 
Surrealism 2 hours 
Analysis of 19th and early 20th century 
French poetry, including the works of 
Lamartine, Hugo, Gautier, Baudelaire, 
Rimbaud, Apollinaire, Breton, and others. 
Conducted in French. Prerequisite: A good 
reading knowledge of French. Fr. 351 or 352 
is recommended. 

Fr. 487-488 Independent Study 

2 or 4 hours each 

Fr. 490 Senior Project 2-8 hours 

German 

Ger. 101 Basic German I 4 hours 
Fundamental pronunciation, grammar, and 
reading. Emphasis on audio-oral approach to 
develop basic skills of comprehension, 
speaking, reading, and writing. One hour of 
lab work plus four hours of classroom work 
per week. Primarily for students who have 
no acquaintance with the language. 

Ger. 102 Basic German II 4 hours 
Continuation of German 101. Prerequisite: 
Ger. 101-102 or equivalent. 



Ger. 200 Intermediate German 4 hours 
Grammar review, reading, speaking, 
writing. Introduction to contemporary 
German writers. One hour of lab work in 
addition to four hours of classroom work per 
week. Prequisite: Ger. 101-102 or equivalent. 

Ger. 300 Conversation and Composition I 

4 hours 

Discussion of life in Germany. Designed to 
improve communication skills. Brief oral and 
written reports. A feature of this course is 
participation in the weekly meeting of the 
German Club at the dinner hour. 
Prerequisite: Ger. 200 or equivalent. 

Ger. 301 Conversation and Composition 
II 

4 hours 

While improving skills of spoken and written 
communication in German, the student will 
discuss contemporary problems. A feature of 
this course is participation in the weekly 
meeting of the German Club at the dinner 
hour. Prerequisite: Ger. 200 or equivalent. 

Ger. 302 German Business 
Correspondence 2 hours 
Designed to prepare students for possible 
employment in German-American firms 
through the development of skills in business 
letter writing and familiarization with 
German technical terms in business and 
banking. Prerequisite: Ger. 200 or 
equivalent. 

Ger. 306 Modern German Short Stories 

2 hours 

Selected stories by Kafka, Brecht, Boll are 
read and discussed in German. Prerequisite: 
Ger. 200 or equivalent. 

Ger. 308 Modern German Dramas 

2 hours 

Plays by modern authors, including Brecht 

and Durrenmatt, are read and discussed in 

German. Prerequisite: Ger. 200 or 

equivalent. 



84 



Ger. 312 German Civilization 4 hours 
Designed to acquaint the student with the 
history, culture, and people of the German 
speaking countries, the two Germanies, 
Switzerland and Austria. Conducted in 
English. 

Ger. 351 Survey of German Literature I 

4 hours 

Survey of German literature from the 
earliest periods to the beginning of the 19th 
century. Readings in German from an 
anthology. Conducted in German. 
Prerequisite: German 200 or equivalent. 

Ger. 352 Survey of German Literature II 

4 hours 

Survey of German Literature from the 

Romantic period to the present. Readings in 

German from an anthology. Conducted in 

German. Prerequisite: German 200 or 

equivalent. 

Ger. 413 German Literature in the 
20th Century 4 hours 
Introduction to some of the chief authors, 
works, and literary movements of the 
20th century. Readings (in German) include 
representative works by Mann, Kafka, 
Hesse, Grass, and Boll. Prerequisite: A good 
reading knowledge of German. Ger. 351, 352 
are recommended. 

Ger. 487-488 Independent Study 

2 or 4 hours each 

Ger. 490 Senior Project 2-8 

Spanish 

Span. 101 Basic Spanish I 4 hours 
Fundamentals of pronunciation, grammar, 
reading, and composition. Emphasis on 
audio-oral approach to develop basic skills of 
comprehension, speaking, reading, and 
writing. One hour of lab per week in addition 
to four hours of classroom work. Intended 
primarily for students who have no 
acquaintance with the language. 



Span. 102 Basic Spanish II 4 hours 
Continuation of Spanish 101. Prerequisite: 
Span. 101. 

Span. 200 Intermediate Spanish 4 hours 
Grammar review, speaking, writing, and 
introduction to great works of literature. 
One hour of lab per week in addition to four 
hours of classroom work. Prerequisite: 
Span. 101-102 or equivalent. 

Span. 300 Spanish Conversation and 
Composition: Spain 4 hours 
Intensive training in spoken and written 
Spanish with emphasis on current events in 
Spain. Oral reports are based on readings 
from newspapers, magazines and literary 
works. A feature of this course is 
participation in the weekly meeting of the 
Spanish Club at the dinner hour. 
Prerequisite: Span. 200 or equivalent. 

Span. 301 Spanish Conversation and 
Composition: Latin America 4 hours 
Intensive training in spoken and written 
Spanish with emphasis on current events in 
Latin America. Oral reports are based on 
readings from newspapers, magazines and 
literary works. A feature of this course is 
participation in the weekly meeting of the 
Spanish Club at the dinner hour. 
Prerequisite: Span. 200 or equivalent. 

Span. 302 International Spanish 
Correspondence 4 hours 
Designed to prepare students of Spanish for 
possible employment in international 
government and commercial professions 
through the development of skills in business 
and diplomatic letter writing, familiarization 
with technical Spanish terms, instruction in 
methods of modern translation, and 
comprehensive preparation for bilingual 
positions. 

Span. 310 Spanish American Civilization 

2 hours 

Development of Latin America from the pre- 
Columbian era to the present day in art, 
music, drama, history, and literature. Each 
student does research on a specific project 
selected in consultation with the instructor. 
Conducted in English. 

Span. 311 Spanish Civilization 

2 or 4 hours 

Spain's influence on the history, art, music, 
drama, literature, and science of the world. 
Each student does research on a specific 
project selected in consultation with the 
instructor. Conducted in English. 




85 



Span. 351 Survey of Spanish American 
Literature 4 hours 
Great authors and works of Spanish 
American literature from the beginning to 
the present. Conducted in Spanish. 
Prerequisite: Span. 200 or equivalent. 

Span. 352 Literature of Spain: Survey 

4 hours 

Great authors and works of Spanish 
literature from the beginning to the present. 
Conducted in Spanish. Prerequisite: Span. 
200 or equivalent. 



Literary Studies 



Span. 403 Literature of Spain: The 
Generation of '98 and the 20th Century 

4 hours 

Works of the novelists and philosophers who 
searched for the reasons for Spain's decline 
at the end of the 19th century, and of 
representative authors of the 20th century. 
Prerequisite: Span. 200 or equivalent. 

Span. 406 Contemporary Literature in 
Spanish America 4 hours 
Survey of modern novels and their 
expression of important aspects of Latin 
American life. Prerequisite: Span. 200 or 
equivalent. 

Span. 451 Literature of Spain: 
19th Century Romantics 2 hours 
Poetry, plays, and legends from the first half 
of the 19th century. Prerequisite: Span. 200 
or equivalent. 

Span. 452 Literature of Spain: 
19th Century Realists 2 hours 
The regional novel of customs. 
Psychological, social, and thesis novels of the 
last half of the 19th century. Prerequisite: 
Span. 200 or equivalent. 

Span. 453 Literature of Spain: The 

Golden Age 2 hours 

Poetry and drama of the 16th and 17th 

centuries when Spain was at its artistic and 

literary height. Prerequisite: Span. 200 or 

equivalent. 



Span. 454 Literature of Spain: 

Don Quixote 2 hours 

Cervantes' masterpiece presenting the 

contrast of idealism and imagination versus 

realism and practicality in a great novel. 

Prerequisite: Span. 200, or equivalent. 

Span. 487-488 Independent Study 

2 or 4 hours each 

Span. 490 Senior Project 2-8 hours 

Greek 

Gr. 301 Hellenistic Greek I 4 hours 
Introduction to the grammar of the Greek 
language in the Hellenistic Age. Primary 
emphasis is placed on the structure of the 
Greek of the New Testament. 

Gr. 302 Hellenistic Greek II 4 hours 
Continuation of Gr. 301 with greater 
emphasis upon syntax and reading of the 
Greek New Testament. 

Gr. 401 Hellenistic Greek Readings I 

4 hours 

For students who have had a basic course in 
the Greek language. Facilitates the reading 
and interpretation of texts from the 
Septuagint, the New Testament, papyri, and 
early Christian writers. 

Gr. 402 Hellenistic Greek Readings II 

4 hours 

Continuation of Gr. 401 with readings in 

early Christian literature. 

Gr. 487-488 Independent Study 

2 or 4 hours each 

Foreign Language 

F.L. 115-J Caribbean Culture 2 hours 
Study of representative works of 20th 
century authors of the Caribbean islands of 
Cuba, Jamaica, Haiti, Dominican Republic, 
Puerto Rico, and the Lesser Antilles. The 
French, Spanish, and Dutch writings are 
available in translation. Taught on St. Croix, 
one of the Virgin Islands, during the second 
and third weeks of January. 

F.L. 121 Basic Arabic I 4 hours 
Fundamentals of written and spoken Arabic 
are presented in a self-instructional program 
of text and tapes. Two hours of practice per 
week with a native speaker are provided. 

F.L. 122 Basic Arabic II 4 hours 
Continuation of Basic Arabic I. Prerequisite: 
F.L. 121 or equivalent. 



F.L. 255-256 Great Plays 2 hours each 
(See English 255-256.) 

F.L. 257-258 Great Novels 2 hours each 
(See English 257-258.) 

F.L. 320 Seminar in Bilingual-Bicultural 
Studies 2 hours 

A study of the needs of bilingual-bicultural 
education in the U.S., its history, current 
theories and practices. 

F.L. 403 Reading and Research in the 
Foreign Press 2 hours 
(See Communications 403.) 

F.L. 425 Introduction to Linguistic 
Development of Languages 2 hours 
Basic concepts and terminology of 
linguistics. Development of English, 
French, German, and Spanish from the Indo- 
European to modern times. Required of all 
majors in the department. 

F.L. 480 Methods and Materials in 
Teaching Foreign Languages 2 hours 
Methods, teaching materials, lesson 
planning, and extracurricular activities 
necessary for the teacher of French, 
German, or Spanish as a foreign language. 
(May be taken for credit as Education 480.) 

F.L. 481 Foreign Languages for Middle 
Childhood 2 hours 
Methods, teaching materials, lesson 
planning, and extracurricular activities 
necessary for the middle childhood teacher 
of French, German, or Spanish as a foreign 
language. Special emphasis on aural-oral 
teaching techniques and characteristics of 
the transescent language learner. 

F.L. 482 Methods and Materials in 
Bilingual-Bicultural Education 2 hours 
Methods, teaching materials, lesson planning 
and extracurricular activities necessary for 
the teacher of bilingual-bicultural education. 
(May be taken for credit as Education 482.) 

F.L. 487-488 Independent Study in 
Foreign Languages 2 or 4 hours 



86 




General 
Sciences 



The division of General Sciences is a 
grouping of courses only. It is not a 
department and does not offer a field of 
concentration. It provides a number of 
programs, many of which are 
interdisciplinary in nature, designed 
principally for non-science majors. 
Some of these courses, however, such 
as the history of science, are excellent 
supplements to the college programs of 
science majors. In addition, special 
courses are offered for those who are 
interested in the teaching of science at 
the secondary school level. 

Only students who have completed the 
following courses or their equivalents 
will be recommended for state 
certification to teach General Science in 
the secondary school: Bio. 100, 101, 103. 
Chem. 101, 102. Physics 101, 102 or 201, 
202. G.S. 201, 480. See the Education 
Department listings for required 
Professional Education courses. A 
second teaching field is required. 

G.S. 100 Consumer Chemistry 4 hours 
A course emphasizing an understanding of 
chemical concepts relevant to our everyday 
lives. At the end of this course, a student 
should be able to analyze and discuss 
magazine and newspaper articles dealing 
with the subjects related to chemistry. This 
course is designed for non-science students. 
(May be taken for credit as Chemistry 100.) 

G.S. 101 Natural Philosophy 4 hours 
Examination of the physical universe and 
man's place in it through an emphasis upon 
the ways in which the physical sciences have 
altered and are now altering man's 
understanding of the universe. 

G.S. 201 Astronomy 4 hours 
Non-technical course in descriptive 
astronomy and cosmology, including such 
topics as the solar system, stars, galactic 
systems, telescopy, rocketry, and space 
travel. 



G.S. 202 Physical and Cultural 
Geography 4 hours 

Study of the physical processes tending to 
alter the climate and surface features of the 
earth and their consequent effects upon 
human populations. 

G.S. 209 History and Philosophy of 
Science 4 hours 

Study of some of the major ideas conceived 
by western man in attempting to 
comprehend and describe the natural world. 
(May be taken for credit as Philosophy 353.) 
Prerequisite: one year of college level science 
or permission of the instructor. 

G.S. 210 Science, Technology, and 
Society 4 hours 

Historical examination of the effects of 
scientific and technological innovations upon 
various societies, emphasis being placed 
upon technology and science of the western 
world since 1850. 

G.S. 211 Energy, Conservation and the 
Environment 2 hours 
This course will examine the energy 
supply/demand and environmental problems 
facing our society in the future, as well as 
the necessity of conservation of present 
resources. The interrelationships between 
energy available and economic, political, 
social and technological systems also will be 
explored. 

G.S. 480 Methods and Materials in 
Teaching Physical and Life Sciences 

4 hours 

Aims and methods of teaching the physical 
and life sciences in the secondary schools. 
Special attention is given to teaching 
general laboratory procedures and 
techniques of teaching. Each of the 
departments in the physical and life sciences 
participates in the program. Prerequisite: 
16 hours in one of the physical or life sciences 
or permission of the instructor. 

G.S. 487-488 Independent Study 

2 or 4 hours each 



Geography 



(See General Science 202 and Social 
Science 302.) 



87 




Health 
Science 



Aims 

The curriculum in Health Science is 
interdepartmental, providing the 
opportunity to earn a Bachelor of 
Science degree for students who have 
completed accredited allied health 
certification programs at other 
institutions. 



88 



In addition to the all-college graduation 
requirements, students in Health 
Science may choose among three 
specializations: Science, Management, 
and Education. These programs are 
designed to prepare allied health 
professionals for graduate or 
professional school, career changes 
within allied health fields, or 
management or educational positions in 
health professions agencies. 

Requirements for a Degree 
in Health Science 

Students admitted to this degree 
program must have completed an 
accredited allied health certification in 
areas such as respiratory therapy, 
radiology, or a comparable field. 

In the Science area of specialization, 
students must complete 44 hours of 



selected science courses, plus a Senior 
Project. These courses will include 
Chemistry 101, 102, 211, and 212; either 
Physics 101 and 102 or Physics 201 and 
202; Mathematics 281; and 16 hours 
chosen from Biology 100, 167, 343, 365, 
440, and 467. 

In the Management area of 
specialization, students must complete 
42 hours of selected courses, plus a 
Senior Project. These courses will 
include Economics 111, 200, 241, 246, 
280, 286, 287, and 290; Computer 
Science 140 or 144; Mathematics 281 
and 282; and Communications 302. 

In the Education area of specialization, 
students must complete 40 hours of 
selected courses, plus a Senior Project. 
These courses will include Education 
201, 202, 333, 349, 428, and 470, as well 
as three new courses which will be 
available in the 1982-1983 listings in 
Instructional Theory and application, 
Curriculum Development, and 
Education in Non-School Settings. In 
addition, students will complete 
Psychology 100, and Sociology 100 
and 362. 

For course descriptions, see the listings 
in the respective departments. Further 
details of the program may be obtained 
from the Director of the Health Science 
Degree Program or the Office of the 
Dean of the Faculty. 

Heuristics 



Heuristics 301-302 2 hours each 
Investigation and discovery of 
methodologies of problem-solving within a 
broad spectrum of academic disciplines and 
pragmatic pursuits. Not open to freshmen. 



**Q^ 




History and 

Political 

Science 



Aims 

To present the origin and development 
of institutions and ideas; to point out 
the great traditions that are molding 
our thought and action today; and to 
gain a better perspective of our 
political, economic, cultural, and social 
life. The courses in political science are 
intended to acquaint the student with 
political institutions and political 
problems in the Unitpd States and the 
world today. 

Requirements for Field of 
Concentration in History 

Twelve hours in European history, 
including History 301-302, 12 hours of 
American history, including History 
201-202. Four hours in political science, 
four hours in either African or Asian or 
Latin American history, History 477, 
and a Senior Project. Students planning 
to attend graduate or professional 
schools should anticipate possible 
requirements in the areas of foreign 
language, statistics, accounting, and 
computer technology. 



89 



Requirements for Field of 
Concentration in Political 
Science and History 

Students selecting a field of 
concentration in this area are required 
to take Political Science 225, 328, 357, 
478; History 201-202, 302 (with History 
100 or 301 as possible substitutes when 
necessary); plus 16 additional hours 
selected from the area of political 
science, including a Senior Project. 
Students planning to attend law school, 
graduate school, or other professional 
schools should anticipate possible 
requirements in such areas as foreign 
language, statistics, economics, 
accounting, and computer technology. 

European and World History 

Hist. 100 Western Civilization 4 hours 
A survey of the Greek, Roman, Medieval 
and modern periods of western history. 
Cultural, diplomatic, economic, social and 
political topics are considered. 

Hist. 297-298 Special Studies in History 

2 or 4 hours 

Designed to permit students to study with 
various faculty members in the department 
or with visiting instructors or other 
competent foreign visitors. 

Hist. 301-302 Modern European History 

4 hours each 

Survey of European civilization from the 
Renaissance to the present. Second semester 
begins with 1815. 



Hist. 325 British History to the 
18th Century 4 hours 
Study of the structure and growth of British 
society from Roman Britain to the Glorious 
Revolution of 1688. Topics such as Anglo- 
Saxon England, the nature of medieval 
kingship, the evolution of parliament, the 
English Reformation, and the causes and 
nature of the 17th century revolutions will 
be examined. 

Hist. 326 British History Since the 
17th Century 4 hours 
Study of the structure and growth of British 
society from 1688 to the present. Topics such 
as the nature of 18th century politics, the 
Industrial Revolution, liberal and Victorian 
England, the impact of the World Wars on 
British society, and the "Irish Question" will 
be examined. 

Hist. 351 Ancient Near Eastern 
Civilization 4 hours 
(See Religious Studies 351.) 

Hist. 353 Hellenistic Civilization 

4 hours 

(See Religious Studies 353.) 

Hist. 371 Introduction to African 
Civilization 4 hours 
Historical survey of the peoples, nations, 
kingdoms, and empires of sub-saharan 
Africa from prehistory to the beginning of 
the colonial period. The cultural, religious, 
and political life of the African peoples is 
considered. 

Hist. 372 Modern African States 2 hours 
Study of the growth and evolution of the 
modern African states from colonial 
possessions to independent nations. The 
problems facing Africa in the modern world 
are examined. 

Hist. 381 History of the Middle East and 
North Africa 2 hours 
Historical survey of the rise of the Islamic 
empires from the time of the Prophet, 
including the Caliphates, the classical period 
of Islam, and the Ottoman rule to the end of 
World War II. 

Hist. 382 Cultural Life in the Middle 
East and North Africa 4 hours 
Study of the cultural developments and 
impact of Islamic civilization, including 
religion, art, literature, philosophy, and law. 
(May be taken for credit as R.S. 382.) 



Hist. 385 History and Culture of East 
Asia 4 hours 

Study of the history and culture of East Asia 
with special emphasis on China and Japan. 
During the first section of the course, 
cultural matters will be examined within the 
context of the pre-modern period (4000 B.C.- 
1600 A.D.). Most of the class time will be 
devoted to a study of historical 
developments during the early modern and 
modern periods (1600-1945), especially in 
relation to such issues as international 
relations and modernization. Prerequisite: 
One survey course in American or European 
history. 

Hist. 428 The Middle Ages 4 hours 
Study of the decline of ancient civilization, 
the Byzantine and Islamic cultures, and 
especially the development of Western 
Europe to the 14th century. 

Hist. 468 Revolution and Reaction in 
Modern History 4 hours 
Comparative study of the English, 
American, French, and Russian revolutions. 
Emphasis is placed on the origins and 
characteristics of revolutions, the roles of 
revolutionary leaders, and the relationship 
of the 17th, 18th, and 19th century 
revolutions to contemporary struggles in the 
third world. 

American History 

Hist. 201-202 U.S. History 4 hours each 
Political, economic, and social growth of 
America. First semester covers the period of 
exploration to 1865; second semester from 
1865 to the present. 

Hist. 225 West Virginia History, 
Government, and Geography 2 hours 
History of the western section of Virginia to 
the Civil War and the history and government 
of West Virginia to the present. The physical, 
political, and social geography of the state is 
included. Field trips to various sections of the 
state are included as part of the course. 



90 



Hist. 275 Connections 2 hours 
A television/seminar program that explores the 
relationships between technologies of the past 
and present. The flexible course design will 
appeal to students of varying backgrounds in 
science and technology. 

Hist. 341 Development of the American 
Nation 4 hours 

History of the U.S. from 1816 to 1850. 
Considers the growth of American nationalism 
following the War of 1812; the rise of 
Jacksonian Democracy and the effects of that 
movement through the Polk administration. 

Hist. 342 Age of Big Business 4 hours 
Political, social, and economic history of the 
U.S. from 1865 to 1914. Emphasis is placed 
on the growth of industrialism during this 
period and the resulting attempts at social 
reform. 

Hist. 344 Civil War and 
Reconstruction 4 hours 
Study of the coming of the Civil War and the 
period of Reconstruction to 1877. Attention 
is devoted to the evolution of the slavery 
controversy, the constitutional questions of 
nullification and secession, the development 
of Southern nationalism, an analysis of Civil 
War causation, the campaigns of the war, 
and the objectives and programs of 
Presidential and Congressional 
Reconstruction. Prerequisite: Hist. 201 or its 
equivalent. 

Hist. 423 Contemporary U.S. 
History 4 hours 

The history of the United States since 1945. 
The course will include a brief review of the 
Progressive Era, the 1920s and the New 
Deal. Films, records, contemporary 
magazines, scholarly journals and 
newspapers will be used in addition to the 
text books. 

Hist. 426 Introduction to Latin 
America 2 hours 

Study of the geography, politics, social 
composition, economic structure, and 
problems of modern Latin America. 



Hist. 427 History of Latin 

America 2 hours 

Introduction to the pre-Columbian, Colonial, 

and Republican history of Latin America. 

Hist. 477 Historical Writings and 
Methods 2 hours 

Study of the major works of the ancient, 
medieval, and modern European and 
American historians with emphasis on the 
various schools and methods of 
interpretation. The student also receives an 
introduction to the nature and methods of 
history as an intellectual discipline. 
Emphasis is placed on the technique of 
historical research, and the art of expression 
and critical analysis. 



Hist. 487-488 Independent Study 

hours each 



2 or 4 



Hist. 490 Senior Project 2-6 hours 
Begins first semester of the senior year. 

Political Science 

Pol. Sci. 225 American 
Government 4 hours 
Introduction to the formal and informal 
institutions and processes which comprise the 
American political system at the national level. 
Emphasis is placed on the mechanics of policy 
making and the behavior and attitudes of the 
American electorate. 

Pol. Sci. 226 State and Local 
Government 2 hours 

Study of the government and politics of states 
and local political subdivisions. Attention is 
given to the federal-state relationship, 
interstate relationships, and relationships 
between state and local governments, as well 
as to the structure, organization, functions, and 
problems of state and local governments. 

Pol. Sci. 243 International 
Politics 4 hours 

Analysis of the factors involved in the decision- 
making process among nations, traditionally 
and in a global perspective. This analysis is 
applied to theoretical, historical, and current 
political situations. 

Pol. Sci 297-298 Special Studies in 
Political Science 2 or 4 hours 
(See History 297-298) 

Pol. Sci. 300 Public 
Administration 4 hours 
An examination of the basic concerns of 
American public agencies, principally federal; 
problems of planning, organization, staffing 
and efficiency; problems of their proper place 
in the political arena; problems of relating 
democratic principles of administrative actions. 



Pol. Sci. 328 Comparative 
Government 4 hours 
Survey of the major approaches to the study 
of political systems, with attention to 
similarities and differences. Focuses on 
political parties, governmental institutions, 
ideologies, elites, interest groups, and 
political culture. The material involves 
specific case studies of representative 
countries in Western and Eastern Europe, 
the Soviet Union, Asia, Africa, Latin 
America, and the Middle East. 

Pol. Sci. 339 American Political 
Parties 4 hours 

Study of major and minor political parties in 
the U.S. Attention is given to the history, 
structure, functions, tactics, and financing of 
political parties in a democratic system, as 
well as to the American electoral process; 
and a brief look at foreign party systems. 
The role of interest or pressure groups in a 
democratic pluralist society is also given 
major attention. Pol. Sci. 225 or Hist. 
201-202 are recommended for background in 
the field. 

Pol. Sci. 341 U.S. Foreign Policy 2 hours 
Examination of the personalities, 
assumptions, and mechanics behind the 
making of U.S. foreign policy since World 
War II. The material provides a framework 
for analyzing and evaluating various 
interpretations of national security and 
subsequent international commitments. 
Reference is made to particular examples of 
foreign policies, such as the Truman 
Doctrine, Korea, Vietnam, and Sino- 
American and U.S. Soviet relations. 
Prerequisite: Pol. Sci. 225 or permission of 
the instructor. 

Pol. Sci. 357 History of Political 
Philosophy 4 hours 
Survey of the major literature in the 
evolution of political philosophy from the 
classical period to Karl Marx, with an 
attempt to gain perspective on both the 
eastern and western traditions. A special 
effort is made to relate the principal 
concepts in political philosophy, such as 
justice, freedom, and equality, to 
contemporary politics. 



91 



Pol. Sci. 371 Modern Political Ideologies 

4 hours 

Survey and analysis of the literature of 
prevalent 20th century ideologies, including 
communism, socialism, pacifism, anarchism, 
and democracy. Prerequisite: Pol. Sci. 357 or 
permission of the instructor. 

Pol. Sci. 372 Modern African States 

2 hours 

Study of the growth and evolution of the 
modern African states from colonial 
possessions to independent nations. The 
problems facing Africa in the modern world 
are examined. 

Pol. Sci. 392 Contemporary East Asian 
Politics 4 hours 

Introduction to the two predominant 
political styles of East Asia in the post-war 
period with special attention to the political, 
cultural, social, and economic characteristics 
of Japanese democracy and Chinese 
communism. 

Pol. Sci. 426 Introduction to Latin 
America 2 hours 

Study of the geography, politics, social 
composition, economic structure, and 
problems of modern Latin America. 

Pol. Sci. 465 Constitutional Law 

4 hours 

Study of the judicial elaboration and 
interpretation of the U.S. Constitution. A 
case study approach to the historical 
development of American constitutional 
principles. Pol. Sci. 225 or Hist. 201-202 are 
recommended for background in the field. 

Pol. Sci. 468 Revolution and Reaction in 
Modern History 4 hours 
(See History 468.) 

Pol. Sci. 478 Research Methods in 
Political Science 4 hours 
Consideration of the scope of political 
science through a survey of the prominent 
research in the field. Attention will be given 
to the "scientific" dimension of this work 
including reference to computer-assisted 
political analysis. 

Pol. Sci. 487-488 
2 or 4 hours each 



Independent Study 



Pol. Sci. 490 Senior Project 2-6 hours 
Begins first semester of the senior year. 



92 




Interdisciplinary Studies 



Aims 

The interdisciplinary studies program 
recognizes that some students are more 
likely to achieve the goals of an 
"integrated education" and a "self- 
examined life," as set forth in the 
Bethany Plan, by designing their own 
cross-disciplinary field of concentration. 
The aim of the program is to facilitate 
such study by providing the machinery 
needed for its implementation and 
evaluation; by aiding the student in the 
study of interdisciplinary methods and 
problems; by critically evaluating the 
student's grasp of methods and 
materials of various disciplines; and by 
requiring the student to integrate his or 
her knowledge of materials and 
methods, derived from various 
disciplines, around a single problem or 
idea. 

Requirements for Field 
of Concentration 

The interdisciplinary studies program is 
designed to facilitate the faculty- 
sponsored or student-initiated program 
of study that cuts across departmental 
lines. The initiator of the program is 
responsible for establishing the content 
of the special curriculum, for stating 
the goals of the special curriculum, and 
for justifying the creation of a special 
curriculum. The Committee on 
Interdisciplinary Study approves or 
rejects the curriculum proposal. The 
program must include at least 24 hours 
(excluding the Senior Project) in an 
approved core curriculum. The special 
curriculum may not exceed 72 hours. 
No more than 48 hours in any one 
department will be counted toward 
graduation. All work is supervised by 
the director of interdisciplinary studies. 
The director serves as the student's 
academic advisor throughout the 
program of study. 



Admission to the 
Interdisciplinary Studies 
Program 

It is recommended that all proposals for 
admission to the program be submitted 
to the director on or before the last day 
of the last semester of the student's 
sophomore year. Students who apply 
after this date may find that it will take 
them an extra summer or an extra 
semester to meet all requirements for 
graduation. 

Student proposals must follow the 
outline provided by the Committee on 
Interdisciplinary Study and must be 
accompanied by proper supporting 
documents. 

All proposals should be prepared in 
consultation with the director of 
interdisciplinary studies. 

Senior Year 

Senior Comprehensive Examination: 
Students must have completed at least 
24 hours of study in their special 
curriculum (including all courses 
designed as required in the original 
proposal) before they are eligible to 
take the examination. 

The Senior Comprehensive 
Examination will be designed to 
measure the student's grasp of methods 
and materials basic to the disciplines 
emphasized in the core curriculum; to 
test the student's capacity for 
integrating materials and methods from 
the various disciplines; and to allow the 
student to evaluate the success of the 
special curriculum in light of his or her 
stated goals. 

Senior Project: Students who wish to do 
4-8 hour Senior Projects must have 
their programs approved by the 
director on or before the last day of the 
last semester of their junior year. 

I.S. 100 Freshman Interdisciplinary 
Lecture 4 hours 

(See page 51 for descriptions of freshman 
interdisciplinary lectures.) 



I.S. 201 World Hunger: The Quest for 
Survival 4 hours 

An exploration of the problems of world 
food resources, production and distribution. 
Special emphasis will be placed on 
inequalities between the have's and 
have-not's, the effects of malnourishment on 
human behavior and on social and political 
conditions, and alternative technological and 
political solutions to the problem. (Not open 
to Freshmen.) 

I.S. 202 Energy: The World 
Crisis 4 hours 

An analysis of the current scarcity of energy 
resources required for the modern industrial 
world: its historical and geographical 
context, its psychological, social and political 
ramifications, and its possible consequences. 
Alternative technological solutions will be 
examined and evaluated. (Not open to 
Freshmen.) 

I.S. 203 International Terrorism 4 hours 
An examination of the causes, methods and 
consequences of the current trend toward 
terrorism as a political weapon in global 
affairs. Students explore the psychological 
and ethical aspects of the problem and the 
media's role in acts of terrorism. (Not open 
to Freshmen.) 

I.S. 204 Sex Roles: A Global Perspective 

4 hours 

A study of the changing roles of women and 
men in the world. Special attention is given 
to the traditional values of major human 
cultures and the repercussions of changing 
sex roles on those values and on society's 
institutions. (Not open to Freshmen.) 

I.S. 210 The Origins of Life 4 hours 
This interdisciplinary course focuses on the 
question "What is the probability that we, as 
humans, will encounter other life forms in 
the universe?". The main focus will concern 
the physical conditions necessary for the 
origin of life forms in the universe, 
particularly with respect to the origin of life 
on Earth. The history of ideas and concepts 
related to this question and a review of 
current theories and experimental work in 
this area will be covered. The economic, 
philosophical and attitudinal impact of this 
question on today's society will also be 
explored. This course is designed for those 
majoring in the Social Sciences and the 
Humanities, although it may be taken by 
those majoring in the Sciences. Appropriate 
laboratory experiences and demonstrations 
will be an integral part of the course. (Not 
open to Freshmen.) 

I.S. 487-488 Independent Study 2 or 4 hours 

I.S. 490 Senior Project 4-8 hours 



Library 



Aims 

The T. W. Phillips Memorial Library 
provides a variety of educational 
services to the Bethany College 
community through an experienced and 
well-trained staff and a wealth of 
learning resources (see page 10). The 
librarians view their purpose in the 
following ways: to provide materials 
which support the Bethany curriculum 
and the individual projects of students, 
to encourage students to ask questions 
and to assist them in their search for 
answers through the teaching of 
bibliographic skills, to help students 
develop a love of books and an 
awareness of the vast amount of 
information available throughout the 
world, and to develop an understanding 
of the importance to individuals and to 
societies of having access to 
information. 

Lib. Sci. 370 Bibliographic Research 

2 hours 

Seminar in the principles and techniques of 
library and literature research and the 
elements of bibliographic form. This course 
is particularly aimed at juniors considering a 
research-based senior project or seniors 
preparing for graduate work but is of 
potential value to all upperclass students. 
Offered first half of Spring Semester. 
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 



94 




Mathematics 



Aims 

To provide the general student with a 
knowledge of the foundations of 
mathematics; to give the prospective 
teacher an understanding and 
appreciation of the fundamental ideas 
of elementary mathematics; to provide 
a tool for the technical student; and to 
give the prospective graduate student a 
foundation for later study and research. 

Requirements for Field 
of Concentration 

The student is required to take the 
following 24 hours in the department: 
Math. 201, Calculus I; Math. 202, 
Calculus II; Math. 203, Calculus III; 
Math. 354, Linear Algebra; Math. 400, 
Abstract Algebra; Math. 401, Advanced 
Calculus. 

The student also must complete a 
Senior Project. Each student must take 
one of the following: CS 140, 142, or 
144. In addition, each student must 
complete one of the following tracks: 



Mathematics: Twelve hours from the 
following: Math. 326, 341, 344, 371, 
383, 384. 

Mathematics-Economics: Math. 231, 
281, Eco. 200, 241, 301, 302, 22 hours. 

Mathematics-Physics: Math. 341, 
Phys. 201, 202, 251 and 252; or Phys. 
261 and 262; 300, 22 hours. 

Mathematics-Computer Science: 

CS 140, CS 142, CS 179, CS 180, 
CS 310, CS 390. 

Mathematics-Education: Math. 103, 
201, 202, 203, 281, 326, 354, 400, 401, 
480, and CS140. 

Only students who have completed the 
Mathematics-Education track will be 
recommended for state certification to 
teach mathematics in secondary school. 
See the Education Department listings 
for required Professional Education 
courses. A second teaching field is 
required. 

Math. 103 Elementary Algebra 4 hours 
Designed to prepare the student to take 
Calculus I. Sets and operations on sets, 
number systems, solutions to equations, 
inequalities, functions and graphing, conic 
sections, synthetic division and the 
remainder theorem, exponential and 
logarithmic functions, computation with 
common logarithms. May not be taken if 
credit has been earned for Math 201. 

Math. 104 Trigonometry 2 hours 
Radian measure, trigonometric functions 
and their graphs, fundamental identities, 
conditional trigonometric equations, inverse 
trigonometric functions, vectors, complex 
numbers, trigonometric form of complex 
numbers, DeMoivre's Theorem. The material 
covered in this course is necessary 
background for Math 202: Calculus II. 

Math. 141 Mathematics for the Liberal 
Arts Student 4 hours 
Introduces the non-science major to the 
spirit and flavor of mathematics. Stresses 
fundamental concepts with the aim of 
clarifying the importance of mathematics in 
relation to other branches of knowledge. 
Topics that may be covered include sets, 
logic, the number concept, history of 
mathematics, the nature and use of 
geometry, computers, computer 
programming, and logical puzzles. 



Math. 152 Finite Mathematics 4 hours 
Intended primarily for students of the 
biological or social sciences. It is also 
recommended for non-science majors 
desiring an acquaintance with mathematics. 
It is not a precalculus course. Concepts 
studied include logic, set theory, matrices, 
probability theory, linear programming, and 
game theory. 

Math. 201 Calculus I 4 hours 
Real number system, equations of a line, 
study of the circle and parabola, functions, 
limits, and continuity. Techniques of 
differentiation and integration applied to 
maximum and minimum problems and to 
related rates. Prerequisite: 3 x k years of high 
school math or Math. 103 or permission of 
the instructor. 

Math. 202 Calculus II 4 hours 
Area between two curves, volumes of 
revolution, moments, centroids, hydrostatic 
pressure, and work. Integration and 
differentiation of transcendental functions. 
Methods of integration including integration 
by parts, partial fractions, and trigonometric 
substitution. Polar coordinates and graphs, 
area, and angles of intersection in polar 
coordinates. Prerequisite: Math. 201 or 
advanced placement. 

Math. 203 Calculus III 4 hours 
Intermediate calculus with emphasis on 
vector methods and functions of several 
variables. Scalar and vector products. 
Partial differentiation and applications, 
directional derivative and gradient. Multiple 
integrals with physical applications. 
Expansion of functions. L'Hospital rule, 
sequences, and series. Prerequisite: Math. 
202. 



95 



Math. 225-226 Mathematics for 
Elementary Teachers 2 hours each 
The first course is a study of the 
fundamental principles and concepts of 
arithmetic. The second is a study of intuitive 
geometry. 

Math. 231 Operations Research 2 hours 
This course deals with applications of matrix 
algebra to business and economics, including 
problems involving cost minimization and 
profit maximization. (The necessary matrix 
algebra will be developed in the course.) 
Primarily designed for students who intend 
to pursue a career in business. Prerequisite: 
Math. 103 or equivalent. 

Math. 281 Statistical Methods 4 hours 
Introductory statistical analysis including 
frequency distribution and graphic 
presentation of data, measures of central 
tendency, relative positions in a distribution, 
variability, the normal curve and its 
applications, correlation and regression, 
probability and statistical inference, testing 
differences between means, introduction to 
analysis of variance. (Not open to students in 
the general program.) 

Math. 282 Statistical Methods II 2 hours 
Testing goodness of fit, contingency tables, 
regression and correlation analysis, analysis 
of variance, non-parametric methods. 

Math. 326 Introduction to Modern 
Geometry 4 hours 

Euclidean and non-Euclidean geometries; an 
introduction to synthetic projective 
geometry; the concept of limit and infinity; 
geometrical constructions, recent 
developments and theorems. Prerequisites: 
Math. 201, 202. 




96 



Math. 341 Differential Equations 

4 hours 

Methods of solution of ordinary and partial 
differential equations and applications to the 
physical sciences. Prerequisite: Math. 202. 

Math. 344 Complex Variables 2 hours 
Complex numbers, elementary functions, 
analytic functions, contour integration, 
Taylor and Laurent series, conformal 
mapping, boundary value problems, 
Laplacian equations. Prerequisite: Math. 
203. 

Math. 354 Linear Algebra 4 hours 
Geometric vectors, matrices and linear 
equations, real vector spaces, linear 
transformations and matrices, and inner 
product spaces. 

Math. 383 Probability & Statistics I 

4 hours 

Introduction to probability, basic distribution 
theory, limit theorems, mathematical 
expectation, probability densities, random 
variables, sampling distributions, point and 
interval estimation, tests of hypotheses, 
regression and correlation, analysis of 
variance. Prerequisite: Math. 202 or 
permission of the instructor. 

Math. 384 Probability & Statistics II 

2 hours 

In this course, the student will apply the 
concepts of probability to statistical 
procedures such as sampling estimations, 
tests of hypothesis, regression theory, and 
Bayesian methods. Prerequisite: Math. 383. 



Math. 390 Numerical Analysis 4 hours 
Numerical methods in evaluating integrals 
and differential equations. Techniques in 
finding the roots of polynomials and solving 
systems of linear equations and matrix 
manipulation. Basic and Fortran languages 
are used to apply the above methods. 

Math. 400 Modern Abstract Algebra 

4 hours 

Groups, rings, integral domains, fields, and 

vector spaces. 

Math. 401 Advanced Calculus 4 hours 
The Jacobian, Lagrange multipliers, limits 
and continuity, completeness of the Real 
numbers, sequences, series, Fourier series 
and orthogonal functions, partial differential 
equations, Implicit Function Theorem. 
Prerequisite: Math. 203. 

Math 478 Senior Seminar 2 hours 
An examination of the historical 
development and cultural significance of 
mathematics. A study of modern trends in 
mathematical thought and application as 
revealed in the literature. An analysis of 
career opportunities in mathematics. 

Math. 480 Methods and Materials in 
Teaching Mathematics 2 hours 
Approved methods in teaching mathematics 
at the secondary level; class period activities 
of the teacher; procedures and devices in 
teaching; organization of materials, testing, 
aims, and modern trends. (May be taken for 
credit as Education 480.) 

Math. 487-488 Independent Study 2 or 4 

hours 

Math. 490 Senior Project 2-8 hours 



Music 




Aims 

To afford students an opportunity of 
developing an understanding and 
appreciation of music; to relate that 
music to the cultural conditions of 
respective periods; to provide an 
integrated study of music theory, 
history, literature and performance; to 
provide the College and surrounding 
communities with stylistically sound 
performances; and to provide for the 
thorough training of musicians within 
the Liberal Arts program. 

Requirements for Field of 
Concentration in Music 
History, Theory and 
Literature 

Each student with a field of 
concentration in music history, theory 
and literature is required to complete a 
minimum of 38 hours in the Music 
Department, exclusive of the Senior 
Project. The following courses are 
required: Music 191, 192, 200, 210, 241, 
242, 350, 360, 477 and 8 hours in 
Applied Music of which a maximum of 2 
hours may be ensemble. 



97 



Requirements for Field of 
Concentration in Music 
Education 

Each student electing a field of 
concentration in music education and 
seeking certification as teachers in any 
state must fulfill the requirements for 
certification in West Virginia which 
amount to 53 hours in the Music 
Department exclusive of the Senior 
Project - seven more than may be 
counted toward a B.A. degree. The 
following courses are required: Music 
History and Theory: 191, 192, 200, 210, 
241, 242, 350, 360, 420 or 430; Applied 
Music: 153, 155, 157, 158, 159; Music 
Education 480, 481, 482 (480 may be 
counted as professional education); two 
hours of Piano (or proficiency 
examination); six hours of 
concentration in voice or any one 
instrument; two hours in an ensemble. 
Student teaching during the senior year 
is counted as professional education. 



Requirements for Field of 
Concentration in Music 
Performance 

Each student electing the field of 
concentration in music performance 
must meet the standard proficiency 
requirements as may be determined by 
the Music Department. Each student is 
required to complete a minimum of 40 
hours, exclusive of the Senior Project. 
The following courses are required: 
Music 191, 192, 200, 241, 242, 350, 477 
and 16 hours of concentration in voice 
or instrument. In addition, each student 
will be required to present a senior 
recital of at least one hour in length, 
which may be counted as the Senior 
Project. It is recommended that 
students also take Music 210. 

Performance and 
Participation Requirements 

All students with a field of 
concentration in any of the three areas 
of music must participate in at least two 
recognized performance groups each 
semester for at least six semesters. All 
students must attend a minimum of 10 
student and/or major recitals on 
campus. All students taking private 
lessons will perform for a jury of music 
faculty near the end of each semester. 
Selected students will perform in 
student recitals held once a semester; 
all will perform in a minimum of four 
student recitals as a requirement for 
graduation. 

History and Theory of Music 

Mus. 103 Understanding Music 4 hours 
A general listener's approach to classical and 
popular music from its early beginnings to the 
present. Aural and historical perspective will 
be emphasized. A survey of major musicians 
within the various genres to aid in developing a 
comprehensive appreciation of music. This 
course is designed for students with little or no 
musical background. 

Mus. 110 Introduction to Music as an Art 
and Science 2 hours 
Designed to aid the student in recognizing, 
reproducing and recording simple melodic and 
rhythmic patterns, this course will examine the 
elements of tonal relationships, simple 



rhythms, intervals, melodies in both major and 
minor scales, recognition of orchestral 
instruments, the historical significance of form 
and vocal music. 

Mus. 191-192 Theory and Ear Training 

4 hours each 

The study of the rudiments of the structure of 
music and the basic disciplines of music theory 
and four -part harmony with an emphasis on 
solfege through dictation, sight singing and 
simple keyboard exercises. 

Mus. 200 Advanced Theory and Ear 
Training 4 hours 

Comprehensive extension of Music 192. 
Intensive study of 17th and 18th century 
harmonic practices. Introduction to 
characteristics of later harmonic styles. 
Continued emphasis upon aural skills. 

Mus. 210 Counterpoint 4 hours 
A study of the basic principles of writing two, 
three and four voice counterpoint and their 
application in smaller forms of composition. 
Prerequisite: Music 200 

Mus. 241 Music History: Medieval to the 
18th Century 4 hours 
A detailed examination of music and its 
heritage as it evolved from the medieval period 
to the 18th century with emphasis upon 
representative composers from each. 

Mus. 242 Music History: 18th Century to 
the Present 4 hours 
A detailed examination of music and its 
heritage as it evolved from the 18th century to 
the present, with emphasis upon 
representative composers from each. 

Mus. 270-290 Studies in Music 

Mus. 272 Keyboard Music: A Survey 

2 hours 

A survey of the development of music for 
organ, harpsichord and piano from the late 
15th through 20th centuries. Emphasis upon 
the growth of the instruments and their 
importance within various musical styles. 



98 



Mus. 274 The Lied: Its History and 
Development 2 hours 
Comprehensive survey of the development of 
the lied as a genre. Emphasis upon Schubert, 
Schumann and Brahms and their influence 
upon this style of composition. 

Mus. 275 Choral Masterpieces 2 hours 
Examination of the great secular and sacred 
vocal genres of the 17th through 20th 
centuries; oratorio, cantata, motet and passion. 
Emphasis upon Handel, Mendelssohn and 
contemporary composers. 

Mus. 276 Opera and the Music Drama 

2 hours 

A survey of the development of opera from 
Monteverdi through Berg. Emphasis upon 
the Italian and German opera schools. 

Mus. 277 The History of Jazz 2 hours 
A survey of the history of Jazz from its 
African, Cuban and American Black origins 
through Ragtime and related styles. 
Contemporary popular music including 
Rock, Swing and Bop included. 

Mus. 280 Beethoven: Romanticism and 
the 19th Century 2 hours 
The study of the music and style of 
Beethoven and his influence upon the music 
of the 19th century. A survey of developing 
musical styles of the 19th century. 

Mus. 281 Stravinsky and the 20th 
Century 2 hours 

Biographical study of Stravinsky and the 
musical styles developed in the 20th century 
from Impressionists through Aleatoric and 
Experimental composers. The use of various 
electronic devices and their influence upon 
music composition since World War II. 

Mus. 350 Form and Analysis 2 hours 
Intense study of musical form as it 
developed from the 17th to the 20th 
centuries. Harmonic and stylistic analysis of 
keyboard, instrumental and vocal forms. 
Prerequisite: Music 192. 

Mus. 360 Harmonic Practices of the 20th 
Century 2 hours 

Comprehensive study and analysis of 
harmonic practices used by composers in 
various media since 1900. Students will be 
provided the opportunity of writing short 
musical examples based upon these 
principles. Prerequisite: Music 200. 



Mus. 410 Orchestration 2 hours 
The study and arrangement of music for 
various instrumental ensembles. 

Mus. 420 Instrumental Conducting 

2 hours 

Styidy will include score reading and the 
many techniques of baton use. Students will 
have the opportunity to experience 
conducting one or more of the college 
instrumental groups. 

Mus. 430 Choral Conducting 2 hours 
This course offers the opportunity of 
conducting one or more of the college choral 
groups. The emphasis of this course will be 
upon rehearsal techniques, vocal balancing, 
score reading and analysis of vocal 
problems. 

Mus. 477 Senior Seminar 2 hours 
Reading, criticism, listening and research 
designed to review and correlate a student's 
work in the Music Department. 

Mus. 480 Methods and Materials in 
Teaching Music in Secondary 
Schools 4 hours 

Analysis of music offered in senior and 
junior high schools throughout the U.S. 
Consideration of problems, objectives, and 
materials in teaching vocal and instrumental 
music, theory, and appreciation courses in 
secondary schools. Opportunities for 
developing practical teaching projects. (May 
be taken for credit as Education 480.) 

Mus. 481 Methods and Materials in 
Teaching Elementary Schools I 2 hours 
The aims and values of elementary school 
music will be studied, opportunities to 
develop teaching techniques will be 
provided, and introductions to standard 
materials will be made. Required of all 
elementary education majors. 

Mus. 482 Methods and Materials in 
Teaching Elementary Schools II 2 hours 
A continuation of Music 481. Required of all 
students with a field of concentration in 
music education. 

Mus. 487-488 Independent Study 

2-4 hours 

Individual study in the areas of music 
history, style, theory or performance 
practice in which the student is qualified to 
work independently. Independent study is 
offered only in areas not included in other 
courses in the Music Department. 
Prerequisites: Adequate preparation to 
undertake the study as determined by the 
instructor, and permission of the head of the 
department. 



Mus. 490 Senior Project 2-4 hours 
During the junior year each music major 
must present for the approval of the 
department a prospectus for a major project 
in performance, research or the history of a 
specific area of music. During the senior 
year the music major must successfully 
complete this project and defend it in oral or 
written form. Acceptable projects include a 
solo performance at least one hour in length; 
the research of an area of performance 
practice within a particular period; a lecture 
recital; or a study of a specific aspect of 
music history or education. 



Applied Music 



Mus. U5-116 Madrigal Ensemble 1 hour 
Preparation for performance of madrigal and 
other smaller group choral music for advanced 
voices. Membership limited: enrollment by 
audition. 

Mus. 125-126 Concert Choir 1 hour 
Preparation for performance of standard 
choral literature both sacred and secular. 
Enrollment by audition. 

Mus. 127-128 Glee Club 1 hour 
Study and preparation for performance of 
choral repertoire for bass, baritone and tenor. 
Membership limited; enrollment by audition. 
Auditions open to all students. 

Mus. 131-132 Ensemble 1 hour 
Study and preparation for performance of 
music for wind instruments from the 17th 
through 20th centuries. Enrollment by 
audition. 

Mus. 133-134 Concert Band 1 hour 
An ensemble of wind and percussion 
instruments which plays for festive and athletic 
events of the College. Enrollment by 
permission of the director. 



99 



Mus. 135-136 Chamber Ensemble 1 hour 
Study and preparation for performance of the 
standard chamber literature; quartets, trios 
and other works according to the 
instrumentalists available. Enrollment by 
audition. 

Mus. 137-138 Jazz Band 1 hour 
Study and preparation for performance of 
arrangements for large jazz band. Designed to 
develop an appreciation for the musical styles 
of Glenn Miller, Woody Herman, Stan 
Kenton, and others. Enrollment by audition. 

Mus. 153 Fundamentals of Voice 1 hour 

Class instruction in the rudiments of vocal 
technique, theory and the principles of diction. 
Designed for those with no previous vocal 
experience. 

Mus. 154 Fundamentals of Guitar 1 hour 
Class instruction in the rudiments of guitar. 
Open to those with minimal experience. Theory 
and literature will be emphasized. 

Mus. 155 Fundamentals of Strings 1 hour 
Class instruction in the rudiments of all the 
string instruments. Preparation of simple 
compositions of each instrument. 

Mus. 157 Fundamentals of Woodwinds 

1 hour 

Class instruction in the rudiments of all the 
woodwind instruments. Preparation of simple 
compositions for each instrument. 



Mus. 158 Fundamentals of Brass 1 hour 
Class instruction in the rudiments of all the 
brass instruments. Preparation of simple 
compositions for each instrument. 

Mus. 159 Fundamentals of Percussion 

1 hour 

Class instruction in the rudiments of all the 

percussion instruments. Preparation of 

compositions for the major percussion 

instruments. 

Mus. 161-162 Harpsichord 1-2 hours each 
Private instruction in the techniques, literature 
and history of the harpsichord. Enrollment by 
permission of the instructor. 

Mus. 163-164 Pipe Organ 1-2 hours each 
Private instruction in the techniques, theory 
and literature of the pipe organ. 
Prerequisites: proficiency on the piano 
equivalent to the Bach Inventions, early 
sonatas of Beethoven, Haydn or Mozart. 
Enrollment by permission of the instructor. 

Mus. 165-166 Piano 1-2 hours each 
Private instruction in the techniques, theory 
and literature of the piano. Enrollment by 
the permission of the instructor. 

Mus. 167-168 Strings 1-2 hours each 
Private instruction in the techniques, theory 
and literature of violin, viola, cello or bass. 
Enrollment by permission of the instructor. 

Mus. 169-170 Classical Guitar 1-2 hours 

each 

Private instruction in the techniques, theory 

and literature of classical guitar. Enrollment 

by permission of the instructor. 

Mus. 171-172 Winds 1-2 hours each 
Private instruction in the techniques, theory 
and literature of the brass and woodwind 
instruments. Enrollment by permission of 
the instructor. 

Mus. 173-174 Voice 1-2 hours each 
Private instruction in the technique, theory 
and literature of voice. Open to all students 
who have adequate native ability. 
Enrollment by permission of the instructor. 

Mus. 361-362 Advanced Harpsichord 

1-2 hours each 

Private instruction to advanced students in 
harpsichord. Prerequisites: students who can 
demonstrate satisfactorily their ability to 
play compositions equivalent to: Bach 
Preludes and Fugues, Scarlatti sonatas. 
Enrollment by permission of the instructor. 



Mus. 363-364 Advanced Pipe Organ 

1-2 hours each 

Private instruction to advanced students in 
organ. Prerequisites: students who can 
demonstrate satisfactorily their ability to 
play compositions equivalent to: Bach 
Prelude and Fugue in G, D, Fantasia and 
Fugue in A, C Minor, G Minor, Widor 
Symphonies, Vierne Symphonies, early 
works of Langlais, Hindemith, Messaien. 
Enrollment by permission of the instructor. 

Mus. 365-366 Advanced Piano 1-2 hours 
each 

Private instruction to advanced students in 
piano. Prerequisites: Students who can 
demonstrate satisfactorily their ability to 
play compositions equivalent to: Beethoven 
sonatas, Mozart and Haydn sonatas, Bach 
Preludes and Fugues, and works of Debussy. 
Enrollment by permission of the instructor. 

Mus. 367-368 Advanced Strings 

1-2 hours each 

Private instruction to advanced students in 
strings. Prerequisites: students who can 
demonstrate satisfactorily their ability to 
play compositions equivalent to: Kreutzer 
Etudes, DeBeriot Concerti for violin. 
Enrollment by permission of the instructor. 

Mus. 371-372 Advanced Winds 1-2 hours 
each 

Private instruction to advanced students in 
wind instruments. Prerequisites: students 
who can demonstrate satisfactorily their 
ability to play compositions equivalent to 
those generally listed as grades 4 through 6. 
Enrollment by permission of the instructor. 

Mus. 373-374 Advanced Voice 1-2 hours 
each 

Private instruction to advanced students in 
voice. Open only to students who have 
completed at least four semesters of voice, 
can read at sight, have adequate use of at 
least one modern foreign language, and can 
demonstrate the ability to perform pieces 
equivalent in difficulty to standard operatic 
and lieder literature. Enrollment by 
permission of the instructor. 



100 




Philosophy 



Aims 

To assist the student in discovering and 
developing sound bases for interpreting 
self and society through a careful 
examination of his or her beliefs, 
actions, and claims to knowledge; to 
assist the student in becoming aware of 
the nature and status of philosophical 
problems, commitments, ideologies, and 
models that serve as the foundation of 
human life; and to provide the student 
who expects to pursue graduate studies 
in philosophy with a sound basis in the 
major areas of the field. 

Requirements for Field 
of Concentration 

Concentration in philosophy may hold 
promise for several students as one way 
to achieve a liberal education. For 
others, philosophy may be an important 
related field; or it may serve as a good 
foundation for those planning for 
graduate work in another field as well 
as for those who are professionally 
interested in philosophy. 



101 



Concentration in philosophy requires 
satisfactory completion of a minimum 
of 24 hours, including Philosophy 123, 
124, 323, 324, 325, plus a Senior 
Project, and Senior Comprehensive 
Examination. The Senior Project is 
received and evaluated in the final 
semester of the student's academic 
program. 

The student who is considering 
graduate work should be aware that 
many good graduate programs in 
philosophy require a reading knowledge 
of French and German. 

Phil. 100 Introduction to Philosophy 

4 hours 

Intended primarily to involve students in an 
introductory exploration into the range of 
problems with which philosophers wrestle. 
"Living issues" confront us in such vital 
areas as: the nature of self, man, mind, 
values, knowing, freedom, and of philosophy, 
philosophic outlooks, and religious 
traditions. 

Phil. 123 Basic Logic 4 hours 
Students are assisted in developing the 
ability to recognize the differences between 
emotional intensity and valid argument, 
between verbal disputes and conclusions 
that follow (logically) from premises. 



Recognition of the bases of these differences 
and development of the very practical 
abilities to recognize, construct, and analyze 
various forms of argument and to detect 
logical errors (fallacies) are important 
objectives of the course. 

Phil. 124 Ethics: Personal and Social 

4 hours 

Examination of different personal and social 
foundations upon which ethics or morals can 
be (and have been) built - such as pleasure, 
happiness, feeling, reason, obligation, 
usefulness, and relativism; significant moral 
problems in several areas of life and work; 
and basic criteria for moral decision-making. 

Phil. 250-259 Special Topics in 
Philosophy 2 or 4 hours 

Phil. 252 Philosophy of Mysticism 

4 hours 

Examination of what is involved in the 
experience and claims of several mystical 
groups or representatives, from ancient to 
contemporary times. Emphasis will focus on 
trying to understand the basic claims that 
mystics make, assessing the kinds of 
certainty, truth and insight claimed, and 
exploring the place of "the mystical" in 
human experience. 

Phil. 323 Ancient and Medieval 
Philosophy 4 hours 

Begins with the seventh century B.C. Greek 
mythic interpretations and moves through 
early Nature Philosophies, Scepticism, 
Greek Humanism, the Golden Age, the 
Roman Period, and the relationship of 
religion and philosophy in the Medieval 
Period. 

Phil. 324 Modern Philosophy: From the 
Renaissance Through the 19th 
Century 4 hours 

Begins with the New Learning and moves 
through the rise of "the scientific spirit," the 
development of British Empiricism and 
Continental Rationalism, Kant's 
"revolutionary" impact on philosophy, and 
the major thought forms of the 19th 
Century. 

Phil. 325 Twentieth Century 

Philosophies 4 hours 

A survey of the dominant philosophic forms 

from Bergson, Dewey and Whitehead 

through the rise of realism, logical analysis, 

phenomenology-existentialism and language 

studies. 



Phil. 350-359 Advanced Topics in 
Philosophy 2 or 4 hours 

Phil. 353 History and Philosophy of 

Science 4 hours 

(See General Science 209.) 

Phil. 355 Philosophy of Religion 2 or 4 

hours 

Examination of the major aspects of religion 
from a philosophic perspective. Study will 
include: the religious experience, the 
meaning and significance of faith, belief and 
criteria, knowledge, proof, evidence and 
certainty, concept of deity, scope and impact 
of religion in human life. 

Phil. 358 Aesthetics, The Arts, and 
Philosophy 2 or 4 hours 
Examination of the nature of aesthetic 
experience and its relation to other kinds of 
experience, as well as its place in art 
production, appreciation and creativity; the 
notion of "a work of art"; language used in 
description, interpretation, and evaluation of 
art; and different interpretations of 
aesthetics. Opportunities are provided for 
giving special attention to particular art 
areas as well as to "the Arts." 

Phil. 477-478 Senior Seminar 2 hours 
each 

This seminar seldom consists of a general 
review of all areas of philosophy; the topic or 
particular area of study is chosen as a result 
of student and faculty conferences. Student 
ability, interest, and need are important 
factors. Conferences with and permission of 
the head of the department are required 
before enrollment. 

Phil. 487-488 Independent Study 2 or 4 

hours each 

Phil. 490 Senior Project 2-8 hours 



102 




Physical 
Education 



Aims 

To enhance the health of the student; to 
provide opportunities for students to 
participate and develop proficiency in 
sport activities; and to prepare students 
for professional careers in physical 
education, recreation, athletic coaching 
in educational, agency and/or municipal 
institutions, and sports communication. 

Requirements for Field 
of Concentration — 
Physical Education 

A minimum of 44 hours in the 
department, which must include P.E. 
101, 110, 226, 243, 244, 310, 426, 427, 
479, 480, 481, 486, and 490 or their 
equivalents. Additionally, all students 
must take Biology 100 and 167, as well 
as Education 201 and 202. 

Optional Program Opportunities: 

1. To be recommended for state 
certification, K-12 students must 
complete the requirements for the 
field of concentration. Electives 
chosen should include four hours 



103 



selected from RE. 309, 340, 355, two 
hours elective in each of the following: 
individual-dual and field-court, and four 
hours elective clinics. See the Education 
Department listings for the required 
Professional Education courses. A 
second teaching field is required. 

2. lb be recommended for state 
certification 7-9 or 7-12, a minimum of 
34 hours in Physical Education is 
required. This must include the 
following: P.E. 101, 110, 226, 243, 244, 
426. 427, 479, 480: four hours selected 
from P.E. 309, 340, 355; two hours of 
elective in each of the following: 
individual-dual and field court, and four 
hours elective clinics. Students also 
must complete Bio. 100 and 167. See 
the Education Department listings for 
required Professional Education 
courses. A second field is required. 

3. For non-physical education majors, 
an emphasis in coaching is available. 
Eighteen hours are required which 
must include Biology 167, P.E. 355, 
340, 485, and two hours selected from 
P.E. 300-305. Electives include P.E. 
243, 244, 426 or 427. 



Requirements for Field 
of Concentration — 
Leisure Studies 

A. Leisure Management - A minimum 
of 38 hours in the department which 
must include 110, 120, 167, 226, 243, 
244, 280, 290, 385, 386, 426, 427, 476, 
490 and two hours of performance. 
Additionally, all students must take 
Biology 100; Economics 200, 241, 280, 
290, 311. 

B. Leisure Services - A minimum of 
44 hours in the department which must 
include 110, 120, 167, 226, 243, 244, 280, 
290, 309, 385, 386, 426, 427, 476, 480, 
490, and two hours of performance. 
Additionally, all students must take 
Biology 100; Economics 200, 241, 280; 
Art 340; Music 110 and two hours of 
Theatre. 

The following courses are 
recommended: Soc. 361, 362; Pol. Sci. 
226; Bio. 230 S. 

A department-approved internship in 
leisure field is required. Advanced 
courses in Leisure Studies, P.E. 280, 
290, 385, 386, and 476, will begin to be 
offered regularly in 1981. 

Activity Performance 
Requirements 

(Physical Education Majors) 

Each student is expected to show 
proficiency in a minimum of 11 different 
activities which cover each of the seven 
activity areas. The following levels of 
proficiency are expected prior to 
student teaching: 

A. Competency Level I in six activities. 

B. Competency Level II in three 
activities, which differ from those in 
Level I. 

C. Competency Level III in two 
activities, which differ in proficiency 
from those on Competency Level I or 
II. Each Competency Level may be 
obtained by previous participation 
experiences, i.e., high school athletics. 



P.E. 100-165 Physical Education 
Performance Courses 

Skills in performances, knowledge of 
strategies, rules, equipment and methods, 
and participation in sport forms. For non- 
majors, a maximum of four hours may be 
credited toward graduation requirements. 
Specific requirements of majors, six hours 
(excluding P.E. 150-163), but not to exceed 10 
hours. 

Courses Available 

P.E. 101 Gymnastics 

P.E. 110 Aquatics (Senior Life Saving) 

P.E. Ill Swimming (Basic - Advanced) 

P.E. 120 Folk Dance 

P.E. 121 Horseback Riding 

P.E. 130 Golf - Handball - Paddle Ball 

P.E. 131 Orienteering 

P.E. 132 Archery - Table Tennis 

P.E. 134 Body Mechanics 

P.E. 135 Tennis - Badminton 

P.E. 137 Modern Dance - Rhythms 

P.E. 139 Physical Fitness 

P.E. 140 Field Hockey - Softball 

P.E. 141 Aerobics 

P.E. 142 Track & Field - Wrestling 

P.E. 144 Soccer - Volleyball 

P.E. 146 Football - Wrestling 

P.E. 150 Varsity Baseball 

P.E. 151 Varsity Basketball (M) 

P.E. 152 Varsity Basketball (W) 

P.E. 153 Varsity Cross Country 

P.E. 154 Varsity Field Hockey 

P.E. 155 Varsity Football 

P.E. 156 Varsity Golf 

P.E. 157 Varsity Soccer 

P.E. 158 Varsity Swimming 

P.E. 159 Varsity Tennis (M) 

P.E. 160 Varsity Tennis (W) 

P.E. 161 Varsity Track 

P.E. 162 Varsity Volleyball 

P.E. 163 Varsity Softball 



104 



Recommended Sequence of Courses for Physical Education 
Majors 



First Semester 



Credit Second Semester 



Credit 



Freshman 

Bio. 100 


Animal Biology 


4 


Bio. 167 


Introduction to Mammalian Anatomy 
and Physiology 


2 








Psych. 100 


General Psychology 


4 








P.E.- 


Performance Courses (100-170) 


2 


Sophomore 

RE. 226 


First Aid 


2 


RE. 244 


Philosophical-Historical Perspective * 


4 


Ed. 201 


Human Development & Learning I 


4 


Ed. 202 


Human Development & Learning II 


4 


RE. 243 


Socio-Psychological Perspective* 


4 


Ed. 249 


Participation in Secondary Schools 


2 


P.E.- 


Performance Courses (100-170) 


2 


P.E.- 


Performance Courses (100-170) 


2 


Junior 

RE. 479 


Teaching Physical Education I 


4 


RE. 426 


Kinesiology 


2 


RE. 310 


Adapted Physical Education 


2 


RE. 427 


Physiology 


2 


RE. 110 


Aquatics 


1 


RE. 480 


Teaching Physical Education II 


4 


P.E.- 


Clinic (300-308) 


2 


RE. 481 


Elementary School Physical Education 


2 


P.E.- 


Performance (100-160) 


2 


RE. 101 


Gymnastics 


1 


Senior 

Ed. 333 


Educational Psychology 


2 


RE. 486 


Issues in Sport 


2 


Ed. 401 


History and Philosophy 


2 


RE. 490 


Senior Project 


2-8 


Ed. 428 
Ed. 470 


Principles and Techniques of 
Secondary Education 

Observation and Directed Teaching 


4 
8 


P.E.- 
P.E.- 


Elective 
Clinic (300-308) 


2-4 

2 



T.E. 243-244 may be taken in the freshman year but Soc. 100, Psych. 100, and/or Phil. 100 are recommended as prerequisites. 



105 




P.E. 167 Introduction to Mammalian 
Anatomy and Physiology 4 hours 
(See Biology 167.) 

P.E. 200-225 Physical Education 
Performance Courses 1 hour each 
Advanced skills in performance, advanced 
knowledge of rules, equipment and methods; 
participation in sport forums. Open to non- 
majors. Prerequisite: successful completion 
of 100 level performance course. 

Courses Available 

P.E. 201 Gymnastics 

P.E. 210 Aquatics WSI 

P.E. 222 Archery - Table Tennis 

P.E. 224 Tennis - Badminton 

P.E. 226 First Aid as Related to the 
Principles of Biology 2 hours 
(See Biology 105.) 



P.E. 227 Personal and Community 
Health 4 hours 

Fundamental knowledge of personal and 
community health matters pertaining to the 
social group: communicable diseases, vital 
statistics, and legal and social regulations. 

P.E. 243 Socio-Psychological Perspective 

4 hours 

Consideration of small sport groups as 
micro-social systems; application of group 
dynamics theory and small group research to 
the study of sport groups; investigation of 
the influence of group member 
characteristics, environmental factors, 
interpersonal relations, and group structural 
characteristics on individual member 
adjustment and group effectiveness. 
Designed to investigate those aspects of 
psychology which influence the performance 
and the participant in sport. Additional 
factors such as motives, arousal, aggression, 
and other socio-psychological variables will 
be covered. 

P.E. 244 Philosophical-Historical 
Perspective 4 hours 

Philosophical inquiry into physical education. 
Consideration given to general philosophical 
interpretation of the nature and purpose of 
physical education. Review of the historical 
and philosophical changes in American 
education with emphasis on the developing 
roles of professional physical education. 

P.E. 280 Leisure in Socio-Cultural 
Patterns 4 hours 

Leisure philosophies in the history of man; 
leisure values reflected in the culture; 
factors affecting leisure such as 
demography, technology, and population; 
social meaning and scope of leisure. 

P.E. 290 Leisure and Human Behavior 

4 hours 

Motivation and leisure behavior; 
physiological and activity outcomes; man as 
a social organism; emergence of leadership 
in leisure pursuits. 

P.E. 300-308 Clinics 2 hours each 
The major purpose of the sport clinic is to 
prepare a student to teach the sport or 
activity(ies) within any phase of the total 
school environment. Emphasis should be 
placed on theory (e.g. football theory) and 
teaching methodology(ies), both skill and 
theory. Skill advancement should not be an 
objective of a sport clinic but may be an 
outcome. 



Courses: 

P.E. 300 Basketball-Tennis-Golf 2 

P.E. 301 Aquatics-Baseball 2 

P.E. 302 Track & Field-Soccer 2 

P.E. 303 Football -Wrestling 2 

P.E. 304 Field Hockey-Volleyball 2 

P.E. 305 Games and Sports for Children 2 

P.E. 306 Gymnastics 2 

P.E. 309 Intramural Sports 2 hours 
Organization, administration, and objectives 
of the intramural athletic programs. 

P.E. 310 Adapted Physical Education 

2 hours 

Variations of the normal types of the human 
organism at different age levels; therapeutic 
measures, especially those which correct 
mechanical defects. 

P.E. 340 Prevention and Care of Injuries 

2 hours 

Common hazards of play and athletics. 
Preventive measures and treatment of 
injuries. Red Cross First Aid Certificate 
may be earned by those who pass the 
examination. Laboratory fee: $30. 

P.E. 350 Sports Information 2 hours 
Examination of the varied duties and 
functions of the sports information director. 
Special emphasis will be on writing general 
press releases, fact sheets, and special 
features; special team and individual 
promotions, and proper press box 
procedures, statistics and reporting results. 
Some attention will be given to photography 
and use of media. 

P.E. 355 Coaching Sport 2 hours 
Basic philosophy and principles of athletics 
as integral parts of physical education and 
general education. State, local and national 
regulations and recommendations related to 
athletics; legal considerations; function and 
organization of leagues and athletic 
associations; personal standards and 
responsibilities of the coach as a leader; 
public relations; general safety procedures; 
general principles of budgets, records, 
purchasing and facilities. 



106 



P.E. 385 Fundamentals of Camping 

2 hours 

History and philosophy of camping; 
organization of established camping 
principles and applied techniques of 
camping; supervision of counselorship in 
established camps. 

P.E. 386 Therapeutic Use of Leisure 

2 hours 

Leisure activities for the maintenance of 
healthy levels of fitness within limitations of 
disability; physical and social skills directed 
toward rehabilitation; meeting needs of 
disabled individuals based upon abilities, 
interests, limitations and psycho-social 
characteristics. 

P.E. 426 Kinesiology 2 hours 

Anatomy and mechanics applied in the study 
of the human body during physical exercise; 
with special emphasis on the analysis of 
motion in specific sports skills and exercise 
patterns. Prerequisite: Biology 167. 

P.E. 427 Physiology of Muscular Activity 

2 hours 

Anatomy and physiology applied in the 
study of the human body during physical 
exercise; with special emphasis on the 
application of physiological variables in 
specific sports skills and exercise patterns. 
Prerequisite: Biology 167. 

P.E. 470 Contemporary Problems in 
Health 2 hours 

Study of current health problems, including 
mental health, nutrition, accidents, physical 
fitness, and drug education. 



P.E. 471 Planned Family and Sex 
Education 2 hours 
Methods and techniques of teaching sex 
education in the educational system, 
including such topics as dating, marriage 
adjustments, pregnancy and the 
reproductive systems, family planning and 
fertility control, and divorce. 

P.E. 476 Management and Organization 
of Leisure Services 2 hours 
Treatment of management principles and 
practices and personnel administration: 
development of management skills; overview 
of personality and motivation theories 
serves as a basic focus. Analysis of leisure 
organizations, including theoretical concepts 
of organizational planning, goal-setting, 
executing, and evaluating. Mode of 
motivation and the impact of individual and 
group structure. 

P.E. 479-480 Teaching Physical 
Education I & II 4 hours each 
Analysis of current methods, materials and 
techniques pertinent to teaching and 
administering physical education and 
athletics. Development of an understanding 
of the formative and summative evaluation 
process in the cognitive, affective and 
psychomotor domains of physical education. 
Emphasis is given to data-collection 
techniques (measurement), data- 
manipulation (statistics), data evaluation and 
data interpretation in view of teaching. 
Integration of administrative processes and 
techniques with teaching and evaluation. 
Must be taken in sequence. 

P.E. 481 Elementary School Physical 
Education 2 hours 
Teaching physical education at the 
elementary level. A study of this age group's 
physical, motor, social, and emotional 
development, plus activities contributing to 
proper physical development. 

P.E. 485 Participation in Coaching 

2 hours 

Required participation and scheduled 
seminars for those with no coaching 
experience. Student is assigned for a sport 
season to assist in coaching at the 
interscholastic or intercollegiate level. 
Assignment of students shall be dependent 
on master of the sport. Prerequisite: 
Permission of the department head. 




P.E. 486 Issues in Sport 2 hours 
Analysis of the origins, effects, and 
implications of current developments in 
theoretical aspects of physical education, 
sport, and leisure. Description and 
explanation of the nature and purpose of 
sport activities in relation to their conduct in 
an education, leisure and/or athletic setting. 
Includes discussion, directed reading and 
individual study related to the impact of 
issues, concepts and trends in the areas of 
education, leisure or athletics. 

P.E. 487-488 Independent Study 

2 or 4 hours each 

P.E. 490 Senior Project 2-8 hours 



107 




Physics 



Aims 

To introduce students to the current 
body of knowledge expressing the 
physicist's concepts of the universe and 
its physical laws; to provide courses 
serving the needs of liberal arts 
students who are concentrating in 
physics or are interested in the physical 
and life sciences, medicine, optometry, 
therapy, engineering, or teaching. 
Students may choose from a variety of 
courses to satisfy a distribution 
requirement, to attain enough 
competence for a future career in a 
related field, or to attain sufficient 
breadth and depth to pursue an 
advanced degree in physics. 

Requirements for Field 
of Concentration 

A minimum of 36 hours in the 
department, including Physics 201, 202, 
251, 252, 261, 262, 300, 301, 314, 316, 
318, and either 305-306 or 303, plus a 
Senior Project. Those students 
expecting to do graduate work are 
urged to take Physics 221, 222, and 
both 305-306 and 303. Mathematics and 
chemistry are strongly recommended as 
related fields. 

A combined plan with Case Western 
Reserve University, Columbia 
University, a dual-degree program with 
Georgia Institute of Technology, and a 
Three-Two Plan with Washington 
University are available to students 
interested in various engineering or 
industrial management degrees. Special 
programs are offered in cooperation 
with the Education Department for 
students interested in meeting the 
demand for teachers of physics, 
particularly in upper middle and 
secondary schools. The required courses 
in the Physics Department are the 
following 28 hours: Physics 201, 202, 



221, 251, 261-262, 300, 301. See the 
Education Department listings for 
additional required courses in that 
department. A second teaching field is 
required. Additional courses in 
Computer Science, General Science and 
Physics are suggested for additional 
interest. 

Students interested in careers in 
engineering, industrial management, 
mathematical modeling, etc., which 
might require a background in physics- 
mathematics-economics-chemistry, are 
encouraged to speak to the appropriate 
department head and the director of the 
dual degree engineering program, or to 
the director of interdisciplinary studies 
if they wish to design an 
interdisciplinary program of study more 
suited to their career goals than a 
traditional departmental program. 

Phys. 101-102 Introductory Physics 

4 hours each 

First semester: mechanics, heat, and wave 
phenomena. Second semester: electricity 
and magnetism, light, and selected topics in 
atomic and nuclear physics. The 
presentation is suitable for students whose 
mathematical preparation goes no further 
than algebra and the elements of 
trigonometry. No calculus is used. Three 
hours of lecture and three hours of lab each 
week. 

Phys. 201-202 General Physics 

4 hours each 

Subject areas covered are the same as in 
Phys. 101-102. However, the general level of 
sophistication is higher, the scope broader, 
and calculus is used. Specifically intended 
for science and engineering students taking 
at least a concurrent course in calculus. 
Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab 
each week. 

Phys. 221 Introductory Electronics 

4 hours 

Introduction to electrical and electronic 
circuits and their elements, with an 
emphasis on applications. Prerequisite: 
Phys. 101-102 or Phys. 201-202, or permission 
of the head of the department. 

Phys. 222 Digital Electronics 4 hours 
An introduction to digital electronics with 
applications in instrumentation and 
computer electronics. Topics include Boolean 



Algebra, basic gates, logic families, 
encoders-decoders, astable/monostable 
multivibrators, flip-flops, counters, readouts, 
shift registers, bi-directional bus structure, 
serial-parallel/parallel-serial data conversion, 
D to A and A to D conversion. Three hours 
of lecture and two hours of lab each week. 
Prerequisite: Math 103 or equivalent or 
permission of the head of the department. 

Phys. 251 Mechanics I 4 hours 
Particle mechanics; central force motions; 
motions of rigid bodies; free, forced, and 
coupled oscillations; rotations about an axis; 
moving coordinate systems; conservation 
theorems. Prerequisite: Phys. 201-202 or 
permission of the head of the department. 

Phys. 252 Mechanics II 2 hours 
Lagrange's equations, relativistic mechanics, 
mechanics of continuous media, and theory 
of small vibrations. Prerequisite: Phys251. 

Phys. 261 Electricity and Magnetism I 

2 hours 

Electrostatics, magnetostatics, and scalar 
and vector fields. Prerequisite: Phys. 201-202 
or permission of the head of the department. 

Phys. 262 Electricity and Magnetism II 

4 hours 

Multi-pole expansion of the potential, 
Poynting's vector, electrodynamics, 
Maxwell's equations, boundary conditions, 
and wave propagation. Prerequisite: 
Phys. 261. 

Phys. 300 Modern Physics 4 hours 
A presentation, based on mathematical and 
physical reasoning, of the foundations of 
modern physics. Treats the subjects of 
special relativity, kinetic theory, atomic 
theory, and introductory quantum mechanics 



on the level of the Schroedinger equation. 
Intended for chemistry, mathematics, 
physics, or pre-engineering majors. 
Prerequisite: Phys. 201-202 or permission of 
the head of the department. 

Phys. 301 Advanced Physics Lab I 

2 hours 

Offered concurrently with Phys. 300 to 
provide more experience with problem 
solving and to provide a laboratory 
experience where many of the landmark 
experiments carried out in the developing 
stages of modern physics can be repeated. 
The student may also conduct several 
computer simulated experiments. 

Phys. 303 Statistical Thermodynamics 

4 hours 

Study of macroscopic systems of many 
atoms or molecules which provides an 
introduction to the subjects of statistical 
mechanics, kinetic theory, thermodynamics, 
and heat. Material emphasizes concepts 
useful to those majoring in physics, 
chemistry, and pre-engineering. 
Prerequisite: Physics 201-202. 

Phys. 305 Geometric Optics 2 hours 
The study of light from a non-wave theory 
standpoint. This course includes the study of 
reflection, and optical instruments. 
Prerequisite: Phys. 201-202 or permission of 
the head of the department. 

Phys. 306 Physical Optics 2 hours 
A continuation of Phys. 305, including wave 
theory of light. Topics covered in this course 
include interference, dispersion diffraction, 
polarization, and electro-magnetic nature of 
light. Prerequisite: Phys. 305. 

Phys. 314 Introduction to Classical 
Quantum Mechanics 2 hours 
Continuation of the study of classical 
quantum mechanics begun in Phys. 300. 
Topics include the three-dimensional 
Schroedinger equation, selection rules, 
addition of angular momentum, fine 
structure in hydrogen, exchange symmetry, 
the Zeeman effect, and stimulated emission. 
Prerequisite: Physics 300 or permission of 
the head of the department head. 



109 



Phys. 316 Selected Topics in Solid State iJJB^ ' V 

and Nuclear Physics 2 hours 

Continuation of the study of modern physics. 

Topics include molecular bonding and 

spectra, free-electron theory of metals, band 

theory of solids, superconductivity, nuclear 

shell model, radioactivity, nuclear reactions, 

and elementary particles. Prerequisite: 

Physics 314 or permission of the head of the 

department. 

Phys. 318 Advanced Physics Lab II 

2 hours 

Experiments concerning topics covered in 

Phys. 314 and 316 are emphasized. 

Phys. 322 Spectroscopic Analysis 

2 hours 

Photography and analysis of spectra, 
including: study of flame and arc spectra; 
use of grating and prism spectrographs, 
comparator, densitometer and conversion 
technique; applications of spectral analysis. 
Prerequisite: Permission of the head of the 
department. 

Phys. 477 Seminar in Physics 2 hours 
Survey of physics for review and correlation 
of various fields within the discipline. 
Prerequisite: Permission of the head of the 
department. 

Phys. 480 Methods and Materials in 
Teaching Physical and Life Sciences 

4 hours 

For course description see General Science 

480. (May be taken for credit as Education 

480.) 

Phys. 487-488 Independent Study 

2 or 4 hours each 

Phys. 490 Senior Project 2-6 hours 
Research problems in theoretical or 
experimental physics. Experimental physics 
is offered in such areas as: vacuum systems, 
machine tool operation, electron systems, 
spectroscopy, electron microscopy, 
microwave propagation, nuclear radiation 
and computer science. Theoretical physics 
projects are unlimited in scope and are 
arranged through consultation with the 
student's faculty advisor. 




t J**dr& 






110 



jaf-.w! 






Psychology 



Aims 

To assist the student in gaining a basic 
knowledge of psychology as the science 
of human behavior; in developing social 
awareness and social adjustment 
through an understanding of the 
fundamental similarities and 
differences among people; to encourage 
both original and critical thinking; and 
to give background preparation for 
professions which deal with individual 
and group behavior. 

Two Plans of Concentration 

Two plans of concentration are offered 
- one leading to the Bachelor of Arts 
degree and the other to the Bachelor of 
Science degree. 

The Bachelor of Arts plan is designed 
for the student who, while not wishing 
to pursue psychology in its professional 
scientific aspects, does wish to explore 
in some depth those areas of psychology 
that are applicable to his or her future 
life as an intellectually rounded and 
responsible citizen. The program is 



particularly relevant to individuals who 
are interested in working in the mental 
health professions or counseling either 
as paraprofessionals or in fields such as 
school psychology, rehabilitation, or 
guidance counseling. This program is 
not intended for those planning to enter 
regular graduate programs in 
psychology. 

The Bachelor of Science plan is for 
those students who are interested in the 
scientific aspects of psychology - 
particularly for those who are 
considering graduate work in 
psychology. The department, in good 
conscience, will not be able to 
recommend to Ph.D. programs in 
psychology any student who has not 
completed the requirements of this 
plan. 

Requirements for the 
Bachelor of Arts Degree 

The Bachelor of Arts degree requires a 
minimum of 24 hours in the department 
(including Psychology 100, 103, 203, 
399, and 477) plus a Senior Project. 
Depending upon the direction of the 
student's interests, the department sees 
as particularly useful and relevant 
courses in sociology, philosophy, child 
and adolescent development, biology, 
and the history of scientific thought. 

Requirements for the 
Bachelor of Science Degree 

The Bachelor of Science degree 
requires a minimum of 30 hours in the 
department, including Psychology 100, 
103, 203, 303, 311, 312, 399, and 477, as 
well as a Senior Project. Six hours are 
also required in natural science. Two of 
these must either be in physiological 
psychology (Psychology 335) or in 
biology courses stressing animal 
biology, physiology, or genetics. The 
remaining four hours may be in similar 
biology courses, physics, or chemistry 
(including General Science 100). 



Students planning on graduate school 
are also advised to take at least one 
course in calculus and to obtain some 
skills in programming and use of the 
computer. It should also be kept in mind 
that most graduate schools require 
Ph.D. candidates to show a reading 
knowledge of one or two foreign 
languages, usually French, German, or 
Spanish. 

Psych. 100 or its equivalent is 
prerequisite to all other courses in the 
department unless specifically exempted 
in a course description. 

Psych. 100 General Psychology 4 hours 
Introduction to the general field of 
psychology, including learning, motivation, 
sensation, perception, cognition, personality, 
abnormal behavior, testing, physiological 
psychology, and social psychology. During 
the academic year, the course is offered in 
two formats. In the Fall semester, there are 
three hours of lecture and two hours of lab 
each week, plus three hour exams and a final 
examination. In the Spring semester, there 
is but one formal lecture hour per week and 
a two hour lab as the course follows a 
modified individualized-learning format 
wherein students may progress at their own 
rate, taking quizzes on the various sections 
of the course when ready. Grading is based 
on the number of sections mastered plus the 
number of points accumulated in course- 
related activities. A full-semester course. 



Ill 



Psych. 103 Quantitative Methods in 
Psychology 4 hours 
An introduction to the basic problems and 
techniques of measurement in psychology 
and to basic statistical techniques used in 
psychological research. This course also 
includes an introduction to designs for 
research and experimentation. Highly 
recommended for those planning to take 
upper-division courses in psychology and 
required of all psychology majors. Majors 
should plan to enroll concurrently in Psych. 
203. Four lectures and one lab each week 
during the first half of the semester, two 
lectures and one lab each week in the second 
half of the semester. 

Psych. 180-189 Special Topics in 
Psychology 

Seminars in this category take up special 
topics of mutual concern to staff and 
students. 

Psych. 186 Psychology of Consciousness 

2 hours 

Consideration of the nature of human 
consciousness, concentrating upon both 
normal consciousness and altered states of 
consciousness resulting from dreams, 
hypnosis, biofeedback, drugs, and 
meditation. Emphasis is given to recent 
explorations concerning two major modes of 
consciousness: the intellectual and the 
intuitive. Does not fulfill distribution 
requirements in the physical and life 
sciences. Full semester course. Two, one- 
hour meetings each week. 



Psych. 187 Evolution, Ethology, and the 
Nature of Man 2 hours 
This course examines the various models or 
images of man that have been introduced in 
recent years by students of ethology, 
evolutionary biology and sociobiology. 
Attention also is given to a few of the ways 
in which humanist and religious thinkers 
have attempted to integrate these new 
models. Two, one-hour meetings per week. 

Psych. 203 Experimental Research 

2 hours 

An intermediate-level review of content and 
method in experimental psychology, with 
emphasis upon learning, motivation, and 
perception. Psych. 103 must be taken in the 
same semester. Three lectures and one lab 
per week. 

Psych. 275 Student Development in 
Higher Education 2 hours 
(See Education 275.) Does not fulfill 
distribution requirements in the physical and 
life sciences. 

Psych. 287 Organizations and Human 
Behavior 4 hours 
(See Econ. 287.) 

Psych. 311 Experimental Psychology I 

4 hours 

Encourages the student to become 
conversant with the basic factual and 
theoretical content of experimental 
psychology at an intermediate level, and to 
engage in experimental work in the areas of 
sensation, perception, and cognitive 
processes. Full-semester course. 
Prerequisite: Psych. 103, 203. Three lectures 
and one lab each week. 

Psych. 312 Experimental Psychology II 

4 hours 

Continuation of Psych. 311, covering the 
areas of learning, perceptual-motor skills, 
and motivation. Full-semester course. 
Prerequisite: Psych. 103, 203. Three lectures 
and one lab each week. 

Psych. 315 Modification of Behavior 

2 hours 

Course has two main aims: to help the 
student learn systematically to analyze 
behavior in terms of the S-R-Reinforcement 
principles as developed by Skinner, Wolpe 
and others to help the student develop skills 
in the application of these principles to the 
modification of behavior in practical 
situations. Examples of the latter arise in 
the areas of behavior disorder, child-rearing, 
the work situation, and habit change. 




Psych. 324 Personality and Adjustment 

4 hours 

Covers major theories of personality and 
principles of personal adjustment and 
growth, including development, motivation, 
dynamics, problems in group living, and 
intellectual, emotional, and social 
adjustment. The course should be valuable to 
the potential doctor, nurse, social worker, 
child-care worker, teacher, or parent. Full 
semester course. Three lectures and one lab 
each week. 

Psych. 325 Behavior Disorder and 
Treatment 4 hours 
The development, dynamics, social 
significance, and theoretical implications of 
deviant behavior. While the traditional 
psychiatric diagnostic categories are studied, 
there is a strong emphasis upon alternative 
approaches in the medical model of 
abnormality. The concepts of normality and 
abnormality in relation to cultural norms 
and stereotypes are examined in depth. The 
course should prove particularly useful to 
students planning on a career in the helping 
professions. Full semester course. Four 
lectures each week. 



112 




Psych. 326 Experimental Social 
Psychology 4 hours 

Aspects of social behavior and specific social 
issues are examined within the context of 
theory and experimental research. Topics 
include social factors in the development of 
morals; cooperation and competition; 
aggression; racial and social-class 
differences in personality, motivation, and 
language; attitudes and attitude change; 
authoritarianism and obedience; 
interpersonal and group processes 
(affiliation, attraction, perception, 
conformity, and leadership); and discussion 
of drug and sex issues. Full-semester course. 
Four lectures each week. Prerequisite: Psych. 
100 if course is to be counted as psychology. 
Soc. 100 and Psych. 100 if course is to be 
counted as sociology. 



Psych. 327 Seminar in Theories and 
Techniques of Psychotherapy and 
Counseling 4 hours 

Provides the student with a basic knowledge 
of the varied theories and techniques used in 
professional psychotherapy and counseling. 
Both academic and experiential learning are 
included, which should be particularly useful 
to students interested in going on into one of 
the helping professions such as clinical 
psychology, psychiatry, social work, school 
psychology, counseling, or occupational 
therapy. Prerequisites: Psych. 100 and 32U or 
325 plus permission of the instructor. 

Psych. 328 Human Sexuality 2 hours 
Examination of the various psychological, 
biological, social, comparative, legal, and 
ethical aspects of human sexuality. In 
addition to sexual anatomy, physiology, birth 
control, and venereal disease, the course 
takes up current issues such as sex-role 
development, sex reassignment, and sex 
therapy. Does not fulfill distribution 
requirements in physical and life sciences. 
(May be taken for credit as Education 328.) 

Psych. 333 Educational Psychology 

2 hours 

Study of the application of psychological 
principles to the field of education. Included 
are the areas of learning, transfer of 
training, individual differences, motivation, 
and behavior modification as they apply to 
education. Half-semester course. (May be 
taken for credit as Education 333.) 
Prerequisite: Four hours of general 
psychology. 

Psych. 335 Biological Bases of 
Behavior 2 hours 
Examines the neural and biochemical 
substrates of the more important aspects of 
animal and human behavior. Half-semester 
course. Three hours of lecture and one lab 
each week. 

Psych. 399 Junior Preparation 4 hours 
This course is designed to help students 
round out their background in the content 
and methods of psychology in preparation 
for their senior year. An intensive review of 
the various fields of psychology is 
undertaken and students engage in tutoring 
and proctoring in the General Psychology 
course. Methods of field research and 
program-evaluation strategies are studied. A 
full-semester course meeting three hours per 
week. 



Psych. 415 Systematic Psychology 

4 hours 

Examination of the systematic positions and 
theories that have been important in the 
history of psychology, as well as a brief 
review of the philosophical bases underlying 
these positions. Full-semester course. Four 
lectures each week. 

Psych. 477 Senior Seminar 2 hours 
An introduction to professional 
opportunities in psychology and related 
fields and an exploration of value and ethical 
consideration. Continued guidance on senior 
project and senior comprehensive 
examinations also will be provided during 
the course. 

Psych. 480 Methods and Materials in 
Teaching Psychology 4 hours 
Study of the methods and materials used in 
teaching psychology in the secondary school. 
The course has a systematic and 
experimental emphasis. (May be taken for 
credit as Education 480.) Prerequisite: 16 
hours of psychology. 

Psych. 487-488 Independent Study 

2 or 4 hours each 

Psych. 490 Senior Project 2-8 hours 



113 




Aims 

The department desires to continue the 
historic interest of the College in the 
intellectual, spiritual, and social 
development of the community. 
Students are encouraged to join in the 
exploration of thought and research in 
the field of religious studies. Biblical 
studies form the central core of 
departmental offerings. In addition, 
each student also examines the 
relationship between religion and 
culture (both ancient and modern). The 
personal integration of knowledge and 
faith for an understanding and 
appreciation of value systems is a 
conscious goal of the department. 

The department's aims are future- 
oriented. Rather than teaching a 
particular point of view, the department 
seeks to assist the student in learning 
how to acquire, evaluate, and use 
religious knowledge. Each course is 
consciously designed to enhance the 
student's efforts to interrelate his or 
her varied academic, social, and 
personal experiences. 

Requirements for Field 
of Concentration 

A minimum of 24 hours (excluding 
Religious Studies 100) in the 
department, a Senior Project, and the 
successful completion of the Senior 
Comprehensive Examination constitute 
the stated requirements of the 
department. 

The Comprehensive Examination in 
Religious Studies emphasizes Biblical 
studies, early Christianity, and 
contemporary religious thought and 
culture. 



Students electing the field of religious 
studies are strongly urged to develop a 
proficiency in one or more foreign 
languages, to formulate a related field 
of concentration and to consider 
spending at least one semester in study 
abroad. 

R.S. 100 Judaeo-Christian Heritage and 
Contemporary Living 4 hours 
Study of the Judaeo-Christian heritage with 
the aim of understanding how Biblical 
writers reflect on the basic human and social 
issues which continue to engage 
contemporary man. Study is done within a 
triple context: (l)the Biblical tradition; 
(2) the liberal arts tradition of Bethany 
College; and (3) contemporary questions. 

R.S. 283 Spirituality 2 hours 
The course will address itself to some 
elements of religious practice. It will 
concentrate on the Judaeo Christian 
tradition and mention Buddhism and Islam. 
(R.S. 100 helpful, but not required.) 

R.S. 285 Meditative Poetry 4 hours 
(See English 285.) 

R.S. 286 Cosmic Warfare 4 hours 
(See English 286.) 

R.S. 300 Old Testament Literature and 
Thought 4 hours 

Study of the development of Israelite 
religion and its institutions, the history of 
the various types of Old Testament 
literature, and the thought and theological 
motifs of Old Testament writers. Students 
will be assisted in acquiring a developmental 
understanding of Old Testament religion and 
an appreciation of its continuing value. 
Prerequisites: R.S. 100 and permission of the 
instructor. 

R.S. 302 Wisdom Literature 2 hours 
Critical and appreciative reading of the 
literature of the Old Testament wisdom 
school (Proverbs, Job, and Ecclesiastes). 
Students are assisted to understand the 
ways in which the wisdom school sought to 
understand man, his meaning and destiny, 
his social relationships, and the meaning of 
history. 



R.S. 304 Mission and Message of the 
Prophets 2 hours 

Critical and appreciative reading of selected 
writings of the classical prophets of ancient 
Israel (Amos, Hosea, Isaiah, Jeremiah, and 
Ezekiel). Students are assisted to 
understand the major ideas of the prophets 
and the relationship of these ideas to the 
issues facing both ancient and modern man. 

R.S. 311 Studies in the Gospels 

4 hours 

Students are assisted in developing the 
means to discern the message of the 
different gospel writers. While 
concentrating on the Gospel of Mark, the 
course equips the student to do basic study 
in any of the Gospels. Prerequisites: R.S. 100 
and permission of the instructor. 

R.S. 312 The Pauline School 4 hours 
Students are assisted in developing an 
understanding of the Apostle Paul as a man, 
his thought, his place in early Christianity, 
the thoughts of his disciples and his 
opponents. Prerequisites: R.S. 100 and 
permission of the instructor. 

R.S. 313 The Revelation of St. John 

2 hours 

Students are assisted in developing a facility 
to understand the message of the Revelation 
of St. John and other apocalyptic materials, 
to explore the history of apocalyptic imagery 
and literary relationships, and to discover 
the backgrounds and causes of the rise of 
the apocalyptic movement. 

R.S. 314 The Gospel of John 2 hours 
The student will study the Fourth Gospel as 
an important document in the history of 
religions, as a special literary form and 
composite, as a witness to the historical 
Jesus, and as a continuing witness to faith 
and to the meaning of human existence. 

R.S. 322 Sociology of Religion 2 hours 
(See Sociology 356.) 

R.S. 336 20th Century Protestant 
Thought 4 hours 

Students read and discuss the work of 
leading 20th century Protestant thinkers 
such as Paul Tillich, Karl Barth, Dietrich 
Bonhoeffer, and the Niebuhrs. 

R.S. 341 Hinduism and Buddhism 

4 hours 

Students explore the chief features of 
Hinduism and Buddhism. The course begins 
with an examination of the history, ritual, 
and ethics of Hinduism. Special readings 
focus on the Upanishads and Bhagavad- 



Gita. The student will then survey the life 
and teachings of the Buddha and Buddhism's 
development into its Theravada and 
Mahayana forms (including Zen). 

R.S. 342 The Religions of China 

2 hours 

Students explore the chief features of 
Confucianism and Taoism. The course begins 
with a consideration of the most ancient 
features of Chinese religion and will focus 
then on a careful reading (in translation) of 
Confucius' Analects and Lato Tzu's Tao-te- 
ching. 

R.S. 351 Ancient Near Eastern 
Civilization 4 hours 
This course introduces the students to the 
historical development of life, culture, and 
religions of Mesopotamia, Egypt, and the 
Syro-Phonecian coast, including 
international relations from pre-history to 
Alexander the Great. (May be taken for 
credit as History 351.) 

R.S. 352 Islamic Civilization 4 hours 
Study of the life and background of the 
prophet, the Qur'an, the development of 
Islamic thought, and the early Islamic 
empires. 

R.S. 353 Hellenistic Civilization 4 hours 
Development of an acquaintance with the 
Graeco-Roman Oriental world based on a 
survey of social and cultural developments 
from Alexander the Great to Julius Caesar. 
(May be taken for credit as History 353.) 

R.S. 361 American Catholicism 

2 hours 

A descriptive study of contemporary 
American Catholicism and its roots. The 
course emphasizes such topics as: modern 
Catholic worship, the crisis of authority, the 
"immigrant church," the church and political 
life, Catholic education, and the charismatic 
movement. 



115 




R.S. 362 American Judaism 2 hours 
A descriptive study of contemporary 
American Judaism and its roots. The course 
emphasizes the life-cycle customs of 
Judaism. Jewish holidays are studied in the 
context of Jewish history. The course seeks 
to develop a broader understanding of the 
modern Jewish community in the United 
States and is supported by a grant from the 
Jewish Chautauqua Society. 

R.S. 370 Renaissance and Reformation 
History 4 hours 
The course will trace briefly the 
development of the Renaissance and will 



concentrate on the chief reformers of the 
sixteenth century - Zwingli, Luther, and 
Calvin. 

R.S. 373 History of Early Christianity 

4 hours 

Introduction to the origins and expansion of 
Christianity from the period of Augustus 
Caesar to Constantine. The problems of 
institutions, consolidation, varieties, 
divisions, and unification will be explored in 
historical context. 

R.S. 374 History of Eastern Christianity 

4 hours 

A study of the development of the Eastern 
Roman Empire and Byzantine Christianity 
from Constantine to the fall of 
Constantinople. Special attention will be 
given to the Eastern Fathers in both the 
Greek and Semitic developments of the 
church. 



R.S. 376 History of Medieval Christianity 

4 hours 

Examination of the major developments 
within European Latin Christianity between 
the sixth and fourteenth centuries. Topics 
covered include: the conversion of Europe; 
relationships between church and state; 
contacts and conflicts with Byzantine 
Christianity and Islam; monasticism; the 
development of theology and Christian 
culture; reform, dissent, heresy and schism. 

R.S. 380 Ethics and Society 4 hours 
Studies in contemporary social-ethical and 
public policy issues from the perspective of 
classical and modern Judaeo-Christian 
thinking. Topics such as political and 
economic justice, war and peace, 
revolutionary movements, and 
environmental policy will be included. (No 
prerequisites, although completion of 
R.S. 100 is desirable.) 

R.S. 381 Church Leadership Practice 

2 hours 

Development of an understanding of the 
theory and practice of public worship, 
preaching, and church program planning. 

R.S. 382 Cultural Life in the Middle 
East and North Africa 4 hours 
(See History 382.) 

R.S. 383 Introduction to Bioethics 

4 hours 

Consideration of the religious and ethical 
dimensions involved in human decisions 
concerning abortion, artificial birth control, 
genetic planning, euthanasia, organ 
transplants, medical experiments on human 
subjects, and various forms of behavior 
modification. 

R.S. 487-488 Independent Study 

2 or 4 hours each 

R.S. 490 Senior Project 2 to 8 hours 



116 



Social 
Sciences 



Social Sciences is a grouping of courses 
only. It is not a separate department. 
Students who participate in such 
programs as the American University 
Washington Semester and other similar 
off -campus programs may receive 
credit in this area. 

Students majoring in History, Political 
Science, Economics or Sociology who 
wish to be recommended for state 
certification in Social Studies must 
complete the following courses: History 
100, 201, 202, 225; Soc. 100 or 320; Eco. 
200; G.S. 202 or Soc. Sci. 302; Pol. Sci. 
225, as well as 24 hours in their major 
field. See the Education Department 
listings for required Professional 
Education courses. 

Soc. Sci. 302 World Geography 2 hours 
Study of the physical, social, and political 
geographic factors of the world. Recent 
changes in Europe, Asia, and Africa are 
discussed. 



; ;>*% , 



^M - 




Soc. Sci. 320 Cultural Backgrounds of 
British Literature 4 hours 
Survey of British history from the Celtic 
times to the present. Major political 
developments such as the development of 
parliamentary government and the 
constitution are taken into account, but 
major emphasis is placed on extra-political 
matters such as the development of the 
English language, music, art, architecture, 
drama, the English church, education, and 
domestic life. Every effort is made to take 
advantage of the locale to visit museums, 
castles, cathedrals, universities, Parliament, 
theatres, and concert halls. Taught in 
Oxford, England. 

Soc. Sci. 365 Society and Schools 

2 hours 

A study of the role of schools in a society, of 
the school as a formal and informal 
organization, and of the function of 



schooling. The course will utilize the 
methodologies of the disciplines of 
education, sociology, and other social 
sciences. Case studies and on-site 
observations combine with a variety of 
readings to provide a wide range of 
viewpoints for students to evaluate. 

Soc. Sci. 480 Methods and Materials in 
Teaching Social Studies 2 hours 
Nature, objectives, and curricula of social 
studies in junior and senior high schools. 
Concepts and methods of approach are 
emphasized. Methods, techniques, teaching 
aids, resource units, lesson plans, evaluation, 
and teaching reading and study skills. (May 
be taken for credit as Education 480.) 



117 




Sociology 
and 
Social Work 



Aims 

To acquaint students with basic 
theories, research techniques, and 
applied practices in sociology, social 
work, and anthropology, and to prepare 
students for graduate study in these 
disciplines, or to enter professions in 
community service and other fields 
which require a knowledge of social 
relations. 

Requirements for Field of 
Concentration in Sociology 

A minimum of 36 hours in Sociology, 
including Sociology 100, 200, 208, 209, 
and 477, plus a Senior Project. 
Sociology 100 or 110 is a prerequisite to 
Sociology 200, 309, 320, 329, 330, 353, 
361, 362, 470, and 477. 

Soc. 100 Introduction to Sociology 

4 hours 

Introduction to basic concepts and 

perspectives of the study of society. Includes 

analysis of principal institutions and social 

processes. 

Soc. 200 Sociological Theory 4 hours 
Examination of social thought with primary 
emphasis upon the principal theorists from 
the 19th century to the present. 

Soc. 205 Social Problems 4 hours 
Though emphasis and illustrations will vary 
as the scene changes, the course is built on 
the analysis of fundamental and continuing 
problems and dilemmas, such as crime and 
delinquency, racial and ethnic relationships, 
health care and maintenance, employment, 
housing, poverty, and environmental issues. 



Soc. 208 Research Methods and 
Statistics I 4 hours 
Some of the more common methods and 
statistics used in social research. Includes 
introductory practical experience with 
statistical program packages in computing. 

Soc. 209 Research Methods and 
Statistics II 4 hours 
The student is guided through the formal 
process of designing an empirical project. 
Emphasis is placed upon systematically 
reviewing relevant literature and justifying 
decisions concerning techniques to be used. 
Includes hypothesis formation and testing, 
methods of data collection and analysis, and 
problems of sampling. 

Soc. 210 Race and Minority Concerns 

2 hours 

A survey of racial, cultural, ethnic, age and 

sexual diversity with emphasis on the effects 

of prejudice and discrimination on 

minorities. 

Soc. 309 Formal Organization 

4 hours 

Analysis of commercial, industrial and public 
organizations and bureaucracies. Morale, 
subgroup conflict and cooperation, and the 
impact of social environment or 
organizational structure. 



Soc. 329 Population Study 2 hours 
An introduction to demography. Theories 
and methods of studies concerning 
population size and composition. Trends of 
population change in the world and in the 
United States. 

Soc. 351 The Family 4 hours 
Examination of the structure and function of 
the family as a basic unit of social 
organization. Changing nature of marriage 
and the family in American society. 

Soc. 353 Social Stratification 2 hours 
Study of forms of social stratification and 
differentiation. Class, prestige and power as 
the bases of stratification. Theories of the 
cause of social stratification and social 
mobility. 

Soc. 356 Sociology of Religion 

4 hours 

Formal religion and its functional 
equivalents both in primitive and modern 
societies. The relationship between religion 
and other social institutions. Religion and 
social change. 

Soc. 361 Deviance and Social Control 

4 hours 

Sociological perspectives focusing on 
problems of deviance such as crime, mental 
illness, and sexual deviation. Institutions of 
correction and rehabilitation are examined. 

Soc. 362 Socialization 2 hours 
Study of socialization as a process whereby 
the individual becomes a functioning 
member of a group. Processes of 
resocialization. 

Soc. 470 Field Work 2-8 hours 
Available to students who are sufficiently 
advanced in their theoretical and 
methodological studies to undertake 
investigation of a practical or theoretical 
problem in a field setting. Prerequisite: 
Permission of Department. 

Soc. 477 Senior Seminar 4 hours 
Consideration of conceptual and research 
problems in a seminar setting. Includes 
preparation for comprehensive examinations 
and senior projects. 



Soc. 487-488 Independent Study 

2 or 4 hours each 

Studies may be planned as extensions of, or 

separate from, existing Department 

offerings. 

Soc. 490 Senior Project 2-8 hours 
For students approaching completion of 
their majors. Designed to help students 
evaluate their activities in sociology and to 
integrate their educational experiences. 

Anthropology 

Soc. 110 Introduction to Anthropology 

4 hours 

An introduction to the physical, cultural, and 
technological evolution of man. Investigation 
of human nature through examination of 
cultural institutions related to kinship, age, 
sex, economics and religion. 

Soc. 320 Cultural Anthropology 4 hours 
Examination of cultural variability in terms 
of its implications for understanding human 
nature. Analysis of particular cultural 
systems and comparative analysis is 
included. 

Soc. 330 Applied Anthropology 4 hours 
Planned and directed social and cultural 
change. An examination of the history, 
theory and methods of applied anthropology 
with emphasis upon the dynamics of 
technological change. 



119 



Requirements for a Degree 
in Social Work 

The goal of the social work program is 
to prepare the student for beginning 
social work practice. Students will 
accomplish this goal by completing 38 
hours of social work courses to include: 
S.W. 120, S.W. 220, S.W. 230, S.W. 240, 
S.W. 310, S.W. 350, S.W. 352, S.W. 470, 
and S.W. 477. In addition students must 
complete Soc. 205, Soc. 208 or 209, Soc. 
210, Psych. 100, Psych. 326, Pol. Sci. 
226, Pol. Sci. 300 and completion of a 
senior project in Social Work. Social 
Work 120 or permission of the 
department head is a prerequisite to all 
courses in Social Work. 

Within the Social Work curriculum 
students will be able to pursue a variety 
of concentrations to include child 
welfare, aging, public welfare, health 
care, corrections, mental health, school 
social work, and church community 
relations. 

Students electing the field of study in 
social work are encouraged to develop a 
proficiency in the Spanish language and 
to select distribution courses to include: 
Economics 200, Education 201 and 202, 
Sociology 100, Psychology 315, 324, 325 
and 328. 



S.W. 120 Introduction to Social Welfare 
and Social Work 2 hours 
An examination of the origin and 
development of social welfare as an 
institution in the United States. 
Examination of the role of the social worker, 
and the place of the profession in society. 

S.W. 125-150 Special Topics in Social 

Work 2 or 4 hours each 

Seminars in this category take up special 

topics of mutual concern to faculty and 

students. 

S.W. 220 Social Welfare Policies and 
Services 4 hours 

Examines the social, political and economic 
context of social welfare policies and 
programs. Analysis of specific policy issues 
and their implications for professional social 
work practice. 

S.W. 230 Social Welfare Institutions 

2 hours 

Critical examination of organized societal 
response to social welfare need. Conducts a 
conceptual analysis of the scope and intent 
of social welfare programs, clarifying the 
concept of social welfare and showing how 
welfare intent is carried into constructive 
social action. 

S.W. 240 Introduction to Social Work 
Practice 2 hours 

An introduction to basic dynamics necessary 
to engage clients in the social work process. 
Beginning listening, interviewing, and 
recording skills will be emphasized. 

S.W. 310 Human Behavior and the Social 
Environment 4 hours 
Focuses on the person as an individual with 
the continuing potential for growth and 
change. The maturational process of the 
individual will be followed with emphasis 
being given to interaction with the social 
environment, coping abilities and capacity 
for change. The bio-psycho-socio-cultural 
determinants of behavior are studied 
integrating knowledge of the person-in- 
his/her situation. 

S.W. 350 Social Work Practice and 
Methods I 4 hours 

Basic theories and concepts undergirding 
skills for professional social work practice. 
Study focuses on professional values, social 
work roles, and social work client 
relationships. Skills in interviewing, data 
collection and case recording are explored 
and practiced. 



S.W. 352 Social Work Practice and 
Methods II 4 hours 

In-depth and advanced examination of the 
social work process. Problem solving and 
intervention strategies are studied in 
relation to prevention, maintenance, and 
rehabilitation. The skill of social work 
practice is explored in the context of current 
programs and practice methods. 

S.W. 470 Field Placement 12 hours 
An educationally directed internship 
experience in a social welfare agency or 
program as a social work practitioner. The 
field experience will involve five full days a 
week agency experience during the fall 
semester of the senior year of study. The 
placement is designed to test and increase 
student practice skills with the goal of self 
direction and the appropriate use of 
supervision and consultation within the 
social work practice setting. 

S.W. 477 Field Practice Seminar 

4 hours 

Provides advanced professional knowledge 
which examines problems and issues of 
social work practice. The transitional role of 
the student moving from an undergraduate 
academic setting to the world of work and/or 
graduate study will be explored. Need for 
specific content not previously available to 
the student is arranged. 

S.W. 487-488 Independent Study 

2 or 4 hours each 

Studies may be planned as extensions of, or 

separate from existing Social Work 

offerings. 

S.W. 490 Senior Project 2-8 hours 
Study will be directed in a specialized 
concentration of social work practice. 
Designed to allow the student to integrate 
both the field placement and academic 
experience. 



120 




Theatre 



Aims 

To provide students with a working 
knowledge of the major theatre 
techniques: acting, directing, 
production design, and oral 
interpretation; to acquaint students 
with the development of dramatic 
literature and the history of theatre; 
and to prepare students for graduate 
work in theatre, for work in 
professional or community theatre, or 
for the teaching of the dramatic arts. 

Requirements for Field of 
Concentration 

Each student is required to complete a 
minimum of 32 hours in the Theatre 
Department, exclusive of the Senior 
Project. The following courses are 
required: Theatre 145, 151, 152, 154, 
217, 220, 222, 255-256, 270, 273, 274, 
330, and 477. It is recommended that 
students also take courses from among 
the following: English Department 
courses concentrating on dramatic 
literature; speech, oral interpretation, 
and radio-television courses; art and 
music courses; Philosophy 358; and 
other courses in the Theatre 
Department. 



121 



For those desiring to be certified to 
teach theatre in secondary schools, a 
major in English with a specialty in 
theatre is mandatory. English 480 is 
required for certification. (See also the 
English Department for the possibility 
of theatre specialization under 
Requirements 1 and 2 for field of 
concentration.) 

Each Theatre major must take the 
comprehensive examination. The 
examination consists of an essay 
examination and an oral examination. 

Th. 145 Introduction to Dramatic 
Literature 4 hours 
Study of the development of drama as a 
form of literature, with emphasis upon how 
to read plays and how to attend 
performances of these scripts when put to 
practice. (May be taken for credit as English 
145.) 



Th. 151 

2 hours 



Fundamentals of Set Construction 



Th. 152 Fundamentals of Theatre 
Lighting 2 hours 

Th. 153 Fundamentals of Costume 
Design and Construction 2 hours 

Th. 154 Fundamentals of Stage Make-Up 

2 hours 

Th. 155 Puppetry 2 hours 
Fundamentals of puppet construction and 
puppet stage design. Emphasis is placed 
upon the creation of a puppet program to be 
presented for public performance in 
elementary schools. 



Th. 206 Interpersonal Communication: 

Speech 4 hours 

(See Communications 206.) 

Th. 210 Dance for Non-Dancers 

2 hours 

The development of beginning dancing skills 
with emphasis upon improvisational dance 
modes and creative body language. 

Th. 217 Imaginative Writing 2 hours 
(See English 217.) 

Th. 220 Beginning Acting 2 hours 
Movement, various styles, improvisations, 
projections of character, and speech 
technique. The course includes a 10-20 
minute planned and rehearsed program that 
demonstrates skills acquired in 
improvisation and body and voice 
techniques. 

Th. 222 Advanced Acting 2 hours 
Scene study as a unit of theatrical form. 
Scenes from various periods to be directed 
and performed. Focus on interaction 
between characters. Prerequisite: Th. 220. 

Th. 230 Children's Theatre 2 hours 
The development of techniques required for 
performing before children. Focus is upon 
the preparation of a complete children's 
theatre project to be presented before 
groups of young people. Prerequisite: 
Th. 220. 

Th. 232 Musical Comedy 2 hours 
Study of musical comedy scores and libretti, 
basic principles of musical comedy singing, 
dancing, and acting, and other fundamentals 
of the genre. Prerequisite: Th. 220 or 
permission of the instructor. 

Th. 255-256 Great Plays 2 hours each 
(See English 255-256.) 

Th. 270 Shakespeare 4 hours 
(See English 270.) 

Th. 273 British Drama to 1901 

2 hours 

(See English 273.) 

Th. 274 British and American Drama in 
the Twentieth Century 2 hours 
(See English 274.) 

Th. 307 Interpersonal Communication: 
Oral Interpretation 2 hours 
(See Comm. 307.) 



Th. 330 Beginning Direction 2 hours 
Fundamentals of staging: blocking, 
movement, stage business, tempo, script 
analyses, casting, and rehearsal planning. 
The course includes preparation of a prompt 
book for a one-act play to be directed for 
public performance. Prerequisite: Th. 220. 

Th. 477 Senior Seminar 2 hours 
Reading, criticism, and research designed to 
review and correlate a student's work in the 
Theatre Department. Prerequisite: All 
required courses in the department and at 
least one advanced seminar. 

Th. 480 Methods of Teaching English 
and Theatre 2 hours 
Study of methods and materials used in 
teaching English and theatre. The teaching 
of high school composition and literature. 
Literary analysis, systems of grammar, and 
reading improvement. (May be taken for 
credit as Education 480.) 

Th. 487-488 Independent Study 

2 or 4 hours each 

Individual study in any area of theatre or 
English in which the student is qualified to 
work independently. Independent study is 
offered only in areas not included in other 
courses in the English and Theatre 
Departments. Prerequisites: Demonstrated 
proficiency in expository writing, adequate 
preparation to undertake the study as 
determined by the instructor, and 
permission of the head of the department. 

Th. 490 Senior Project 2 or 4 hours 
During the junior year each theatre major 
must present for the approval of the 
department a prospectus for a major project 
in acting, directing, production design, or 
the history of theatre. During the senior 
year the theatre major must successfully 
complete this project and defend it in oral 
and/or written form. Acceptable projects 
include a solo performance at least one hour 
in length; the direction of a full-length play; 
the design and/or the execution of the 
lighting, settings, or costumes for a full- 
length play; or a study of a specific aspect of 
theatre history. Open only to senior theatre 
majors. 



122 




The 
Directories 

BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

Officers of the Board 

CHARLES D. BELL, Chairman 

TODD H. BULLARD, President 

WM. DANIEL COBB, III, Vice President 

ROBERTA. SANDERCOX, 

Vice President 

JOHN A. GRAHAM, Treasurer 

JOHN E. COSTELLO, Secretary 

JOHN A. GRAHAM, Assistant Secretary 

TERM EXPIRES JUNE 1982 

ALTON W. BEHM, M.D., 112 South 
Street, Chardon, Ohio 

COURTNEY BURTON, Oglebay-Norton 
Company, 1200 Hanna Building, 
Cleveland, Ohio 

IVABELL HARLAN, 1143 Timberview 
Trail, Bloomfield Hills, Michigan 

WILLIAM R. HOAG, West Elizabeth 
Lumber Company, Fifth Street, West 
Elizabeth, Pennsylvania 

RODNEY B. HURL, M.D., 211 Stocksdale 
Drive, Marysville, Ohio 

THOMAS PHILLIPS JOHNSON, 1500 
Oliver Building, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

WILLIAM L. MILLER, JR., National City 
Christian Church Corporation, Thomas 
Circle, Washington, D.C. 

WILLIAM F. PORTER, Globe 
Refractories, Inc., P.O. Box D, Newell, 
West Virginia 

JOHN G. REDLINE, JR., Weirton Steel 
Division, National Steel Corporation, 
Weirton, West Virginia 



123 



TERM EXPIRES JUNE 1983 

CHARLES D. BELL, 67 Seventh Street, 
Wellsburg, West Virginia 

ROBERT F. CORY, 420 Blackhawk Road, 
Beaver Falls, Pennsylvania 

WILLIAM E. LEWELLEN, U.S. Steel 
Corp., U.S. Steel Bldg., Pittsburgh, 
Pennsylvania 

ROBERT MACKENZIE, JR., 100 Chapel 
Ridge Place, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

ANN C. PRESTON, 1324-D Pelican Creek 
Crossing, St. Petersburg, Florida 

JOHN W. RENNER, 601 Rockwell 
Avenue, Cleveland, Ohio 

WILLIAM S. RYAN, Edmondson Avenue 
at Academy Road, Baltimore, Maryland 

ANN W. TROMB ADORE, 626 Watchung 
Road, Bound Brook, New Jersey 

ROBERT C. WETENHALL, McConnell, 
Wetenhall & Company, Inc., 375 Park 
Avenue, New York, New York 

TERM EXPIRES JUNE 198J, 

MARSHALL L. BERKMAN, AMPCO - 
Pittsburgh Corporation, 700 Porter 
Building, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

JAMES L. COLLINS, Picoma Industries, 
Inc., Martins Ferry, Ohio 

JOHN E. COSTELLO, 418 Washington 
Avenue, Charleroi, Pennsylvania 

SIDNEY S. GOOD, JR., L.S. Good and 
Company, 1134 Market Street, Wheeling, 
West Virginia 

MICHAEL J. KASARDA, RD 4, Bellaire, 
Ohio 



124 



EUGENE MILLER, 376 Sunrise Circle, 
Glencoe, Illinois 

G. OGDEN NUTTING, The Ogden 
Newspapers, Inc., 1500 Main Street, 
Wheeling, West Virginia 

HAROLD R. WATKINS, Board of Church 
Extension of the Christian Church 
(Disciples of Christ), 110 South Downey 
Avenue, Indianapolis, Indiana 

FRANK L. WIEGAND, JR., 855 Academy 
Place, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Faculty Representative to the Board 

JAMES E. ALLISON, Bethany, 
West Virginia 

Honorary Trustees 

MERRITT J. DAVIS, 200 Sycamore 
Street, Wellsburg, West Virginia 

A. DALE FIERS, 236 Inlet Way, Palm 
Beach Shores, Florida 

PERRY E. GRESHAM, Highland Hearth, 
Bethany, West Virginia 

ROBERT D. HURL, 56 Harriett Drive, 
Shelby, Ohio 

PAUL A. NORTON, 20 Church Street, 
A-30, Greenwich, Connecticut 

CHARLES E. PALMER, Bigelow 
Apartments Hotel, Bigelow Square, 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

MAYNARD L. PATTON, 3600 Lake 
Shore, Chicago, Illinois 

MALCOLM W. RUSH, 3096 Orchard 
Road, Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio 

D. ERVIN SHEETS, 690 Osceola Avenue, 
Winter Park, Florida 

JOSEPHINE SHEETS WICKERHAM, 
7150 Estero Boulevard, Fort Myers, 
Florida 

Committees of the Board of Trustees 

EXECUTIVE (Elected) 
Michael J. Kasarda, Chairman; Charles D. 
Bell; John E. Costello; William R. Hoag; 
Rodney B. Hurl; Thomas P. Johnson; G. 
Ogden Nutting; William F Porter; Ann C. 
Preston; Harold R. Watkins; Frank L. 
Wiegand, Jr. 

FINANCE, BUDGET AND AUDIT 

(Elected by Executive Committee) 
G. Ogden Nutting, Chairman; Sidney S. 
Good, Jr.; Michael J. Kasarda; William F. 
Porter; (Charles D. Bell, John A. Graham, 
ex officio) 



INVESTMENT (Elected) 
Frank L. Wiegand, Jr., Chairman; Thomas 
P. Johnson; William R. Hoag; Perry E. 
Gresham; (Charles D. Bell, John A. 
Graham, ex officio) 

BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 

Alton W. Behm; John E. Costello; James 

L. Collins 

CHURCH RELATIONS 

William L. Miller, Jr., Chairman; Ann C. 

Preston; William S. Ryan; Harold R. 

Watkins 

DEVELOPMENT 

Rodney B. Hurl, Chairman; Courtney 

Burton; James L. Collins; Robert F. Cory; 

Sidney S. Good, Jr.; William R. Hoag; 

Robert C. Wetenhall; Frank L. Wiegand, 

Jr. 

LONG RANGE PLANNING 
John E. Costello, Chairman; Sidney S. 
Good, Jr.; Rodney B. Hurl; William L. 
Miller, Jr. 

NOMINATING 

William F. Porter, Chairman; Alton W. 

Behm; Charles D. Bell; Rodney B. Hurl 

STUDENT-FACULTY-ALUMNI 

RELATIONS 

Alton W. Behm; Marshall L. Berkman; 

Ivabell Harlan; Rodney B. Hurl; Robert 

Mackenzie; Ann C. Preston; John W. 

Renner; Ann W. Trombadore 

BOARD OF FELLOWS 

DRAPER ALLEN, Detroit, Michigan 
MONE ANATHAN, JR., La Quinto, 

California 
JOHN F. BAXTER, Gainesville, Florida 
LOUIS BERKMAN, Steubenville, Ohio 
THOMAS M. BLOCH, Wheeling, 

West Virginia 
J. CALEB BOGGS, Wilmington, Delaware 
GEORGE E. CARTER, Gates Mills, Ohio 
JAMES F. COMSTOCK, Richwood, 

West Virginia 



ALBERT V. DIX, Martins Ferry, Ohio 
ARTHUR EICHELKRAUT, Wheeling, 

West Virginia 
WARD L. EKAS, Rochester, New York 
ROBERT W. FERGUSON, Wheeling, 

West Virginia 
BROOKS HAYS, Washington, D.C. 
ROBERT HAZLETT, SR., Wheeling, West 

Virginia 
ARTHUR S. HOLDEN, Painesville, Ohio 
GORDON HUTCHINSON, Chattanooga, 

Tennessee 
FORREST H. KIRKPATRICK, Wheeling, 

West Virginia 
ARTHUR J. KOBACKER, Columbus, 

Ohio 
T. W. LIPPERT, Sea Gert, New Jersey 
WILLIAM J. MAIER, JR., Charleston, 

West Virginia 
A. F. MARSHAL, JR., Wheeling, West 

Virginia 
MERIL A. MAY, Garrettsville, Ohio 
CECIL C. McVAY, Greensburg, 

Pennsylvania 
CHARLES L. MELENYZER, Charleroi, 

Pennsylvania 
WILLIAM MONTAGNA, Portland, 

Oregon 
ARCH A. MOORE, JR., Glen Dale and 

Charleston, West Virginia 
ROBERT M. MORRIS, Houston, Texas 
SETH C. MORROW, Delray Beach, 

Florida 
WALTER PATENGE, Lansing, Michigan 
JOHN PHILLIPS, Wheeling, West 

Virginia 
JENNINGS RANDOLPH, Washington, 

D.C. 
W. ARTHUR RUSH, North Hollywood, 

California 
RAYMOND K. SHELINE, Tallahassee, 

Florida 
HULETT C. SMITH, Beckley, West 

Virginia 
ELVIS STAHR, JR., Greenwich, 

Connecticut 
ELEANOR STEBER, New York, 

New York 



GEORGE M. SUTTON, Norman, 

Oklahoma 
ARTHUR A. WELLS, Newell, West 

Virginia 
DAVID A. WERBLIN, East Rutherford, 

New Jersey 
BROOKS E. WIGGINTON, Wheeling, 

West Virginia 

C. E. WOLF, New Martinsville, West 
Virginia 

ALFRED E. WRIGHT, JR., Uniontown, 
Pennsylvania 

BOARD OF VISITORS 

ROBERT C. DIX, Bellaire, Ohio 
ROBERT W. EWING, JR., Wheeling, 

West Virginia 
CARLYLE D. FARNSWORTH, Wheeling, 

West Virginia 
LAURANCE GOOD, Wheeling, West 

Virginia 
GORDON B. GUENTHER, Wheeling, 

West Virginia 

D. MILTON GUTMAN, JR., Wheeling, 
West Virginia 

ROBERT C. HAZLETT, JR., Wheeling, 

West Virginia 
JOSEPH I. STEELE, Wheeling, West 

Virginia 
THOMAS W. TUCKER, Wheeling, West 

Virginia 
GEORGE S. WEAVER, JR., Wheeling, 

West Virginia 



ALUMNI COUNCIL MEMBERS 
1981-82 

FRED S. BERRIMAN, Williamsville, 

New York 
DAVID A. BUTZ, Gates Mills, Ohio 
MARC CHERNENKO, Wellsburg, West 

Virginia 
STEPHEN K. CHERNICKY, Bethel Park, 

Pennsylvania 
DR. TERRY A. CRAIG, Canonsburg, 

Pennsylvania 
WILBUR H. CRAMBLET, JR., Bethany, 

West Virginia 
PETER D. ERBE, Springfield, Virginia 
DONALD FORD, Warren, Ohio 
ANNE HARNER FOREMAN, Allison 

Park, Pennsylvania 
R. NOEL FOREMAN, Wheeling, West 

Virginia 
JOE FUNK, Wellsburg, West Virginia 
MARJORIE SEABRIGHT GRIFFIN, 

Wheeling, West Virginia 
BENJAMIN GRIFFITH, Bethel Park, 

Pennsylvania 
VAL GUNDLING, Wheeling, West 

Virginia 



JOYCE E. HARRY, Hubbard, Ohio 
J. HARRY LAMMERT, Pittsburgh, 

Pennsylvania 
DALE LAUGHNER, Beaver Falls, 

Pennsylvania 
S. DEAN LESIAK, Bay Village, Ohio 
C. A. LINN, Mountain Lakes. 

New Jersey 
BILLIE SWINDLER LYNCH, President, 

Canfield, Ohio 
ROBERT L. MARTIN, Wheeling, West 

Virginia 
JOSEPH W. MAYERNICK, Weirton, 

West Virginia 
RICHARD MEESS, Pittsburgh, 

Pennsylvania 
G. WILLIAM NEWTON, South Euclid, 

Ohio 
DAYTON PRYOR, Allentown, 

Pennsylvania 
NANCY TOMASEK RATCLIFFE, 

Wheeling, West Virginia 
EDWIN SCHULZ, Kettering, Ohio 
JOHN R. TAYLOR, Bethany, West 

Virginia 
ROBERT TAYLOR, Warren, Ohio 
CARYN TEUTSCH, Pittsburgh, 

Pennsylvania 
KENNETH W. VALUSKA, Vice 

President, Steubenville, Ohio 
DOROTHY FURBER WASSMANN, 

Mars, Pennsylvania 

TRUSTEE MEMBERS, EX-OFFICIO 

JAMES L. COLLINS, Wheeling, West 

Virginia 
ROBERT CORY, Beaver Falls, 

Pennsylvania 
JOHN COSTELLO, Charleroi, 

Pennsylvania 
DR. RODNEY HURL, Marysville, Ohio 
MICHAEL KASARDA, Bellaire, Ohio 



125 



ADMINISTRATION 

TODD H. BULLARD, President 

ROBERT A. SANDERCOX, Vice 
President/Provost for College 
Advancement 

HIRAM J. LESTER, Director of 

Development 
DAVID J. WOTTLE, Director of 

Admission 
RUTH L. WESTLAKE, Director of Public 

Information and Publications 
LESLIE C. SMEDLE Y, Jr., Director of 

Alumni Relations 
NEIL K. CLARK, Associate Director of 

Admission 
MICHAEL E. LAUGHNER, Assistant 

Director of Admission 
NANCY L. COCHRAN, Development 

Officer 
ANN P. BAILEY, Admission Counselor 
MARSHA L. CORE, Admission Counselor 

WM. DANIEL COBB, III, Vice President 
and Dean of Faculty 

JOSEPH M. KUREY, Assistant Dean for 
Academic Administration and 
Registrar, Director of Institutional 
Research, and Director of the Summer 
School 

RUTH L. MAR TIN, Assistant to the 
Registrar 

NANCY SANDERCOX, Head Librarian 

MICHAEL WESCOTT LODER, Assistant 
Librarian for Public Services 

RICK P. WILLIAMSON, Director of the 
Media Center 

DAVID M. HUTTER, Director of Athletics 

SALLY I. DORWART, Coordinator of 
Women's Athletics 



LEONORA BALLA CAYARD, 

Coordinator of International Education 

Programs 
LARRY E. GRIMES, Director of Liberal 

Studies 
ANN C. SHELLY, Director of Teacher 

Preparation Programs 
GARY E. LARSON, Director of Health 

Science Programs 

JOHN S. CUNNINGHAM, Dean of 
Students 

DARLINE B. NICHOLSON, Associate 

Dean of Students and Director ofRenner 
Union 
JOHN C. GIESMANN, Assistant Dean of 

Students for Residence Hall Programs 
JOSEPH B. MCGRAW, Assistant Dean of 

Students and Coordinator of Freshmen 

Residence Halls 
THEODORE W. BUNNELL, Director of 

Financial Aid 
BETH DAMEIER, Assistant Director of 

Financial Aid 
JOANNE SYKES, R.N., Supervisor of 

Infirmary 
NICHOLAS POULOS, M.D., College 

Physician 
BASIL P. PAPADIMITRIOUS, M.D., 

College Physician 
WILLIAM B. ALLEN, College Chaplain 
CRAIG A. REPP, Assistant to the College 

Chaplain 
FATHER LEWIS F. GAETANO, Roman 

Catholic Chaplain 
DANIEL M. LOWY, Jewish Chaplain 
W. CARROLL THORN, Episcopal 

Chaplain 

JOHN A. GRAHAM, Treasurer and 
Business Manager 

JOHN L. HOFFMAN, Director of Physical 

Plant 
SHIRLEY JACOB, Assistant Treasurer 

and Accountant 
GARY P. ARMITAGE, Managing Director 

of Leadership Center and Gresham 

House 
GEORGE S. BAUMAN, JR., Manager of 

College Stores 
ROBERT CON AWAY, Chief Engineer 
LYNN E. QUEEN, Director of Data 

Processing 
RICHARD RUGGIERO, Director of 

Dining Service 
JEAN SCHWERTFEGER, Supervisor of 

the Mailroom 



THE FACULTY 

TODD H. BULLARD, President of the 

College on the MM. Cochran Foundation 

(1980). 

Bethany College; B.A., West Liberty State 

College; M.A., West Virginia University; 

Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh. 

WM. DANIEL COBB III, Vice President 
and Dean of Faculty. (1977) 
A.B., Transylvania College; B.D., S.T.M., 
Yale University; A.M., Ph.D., The 
University of Chicago. 

ROBERT A. SANDERCOX, Vice 
President and Provost for College 
Advancement. (1957). 
B.A., Bethany College; M.Div., Yale 
University; University of Buffalo; West 
Virginia University. 

JOHN S. CUNNINGHAM, Dean of 

Students. (1967). 

B.S., Slippery Rock State College; M.Ed., 

Kent State University; West Virginia 

University. 

Emeriti 

FORREST H. KIRKPATRICK, Dean of 

Students and Professor Emeritus 
(1927-1940; 1946-1952) and Adjunct 
Professor of Economics and Business. 
(1970). 

University of Dijon; B.A., Bethany 
College; M.A., and Prof. Dipl., Columbia 
University; University of Pittsburgh; 
University of London; University of 
Pennsylvania; University of Cambridge; 
LL.D., Bethany College; LL.D., College of 
Steubenville; LL.D., Drury College; 
H.H.D., Wheeling College. 

JOHN J. KNIGHT, Professor of Physical 
Education Emeritus. (1930-1970). 
B.A., West Virginia Wesleyan College; 
M.A., Ohio State University; University of 
Michigan. 

BENJAMIN C. SHAW, Professor of 

History and Political Science Emeritus. 

(1935-1967). 

B.A., Rollins College; M.A., Ph.D., 

University of North Carolina; American 

Academy in Rome; Royal University, 

Perugia, Italy. 



126 



EARL D. McKENZIE, Professor of 
Foreign Languages Emeritus. (1937-1972). 
B.A., Brown University; M.A., Columbia 
University; M.Litt., Ph.D., University of 
Pittsburgh; University of Frankfurt am 
Main; Yale University; University of Paris. 

BRADFORD TYE, Associate Professor of 
Mathematics Emeritus. (1943-1973). 
B.S., Alma White College; M.S., New York 
University; Rutgers University; Columbia 
University; University of Pittsburgh. 

GEORGE K. HAUPTFUEHRER, 

Professor of Music Emeritus. (1945-1977). 
B.A., B.M., Friends University; M.A., 
University of Kansas; Pittsburgh Musical 
Institute; Juilliard School of Music; Indiana 
University. 

S. ELIZABETH REED, Associate 
Professor of Physical Education Emeritus. 
(1945-1975). 

B.A., Muskingum College; M.Ed., 
University of Pittsburgh; University of 
Wisconsin; New York University; 
University of Wyoming; University of 
Southern California; University of 
Michigan. 

MARGARET MATHISON, Professor of 
Education Emeritus. (1951-1974). 
B.A., M.Litt., University of Pittsburgh; 
University of Southern California; 
Pennsylvania State University; Ohio State 
University. 

WINIFRED WEBSTER, Dean of Women 

and Instructor in English Emeritus. 

(1952-1960). 

B.A., University of North Dakota; M.A., 

Columbia University. 

PERRY E. GRESHAM, President 
Emeritus. (1953-1972). 
B.A., B.D., Texas Christian University; 
LL.D., Texas Christian University; Litt.D., 
Culver Stockton College; L.H.D., 
Chapman College; Ed.D., Transylvania 
University; University of Chicago; 
Columbia University; Litt.D., University of 
Cincinnati; Ed.D., Findlay College; Ped.D., 
Youngstown University; D.B.A., Lawrence 
Institute of Technology; H.H.D., Bethany 
College. 

SUSAN W. HANNA, Instructor in Health 

and Physical Education Emeritus. 

(1957-1977). 

B.A., Bethany College; Marjorie Webster 

School of Physical Education 



JOHN A. SPENCE, Professor of 
Education Emeritus. (1961-1976). 
B.S.Ed., M.A., Ph.D., Ohio State 
University. 

HSIOH-REN WEI, Professor of Physics 
and Public Affairs Emeritus. (1963-1972). 
B.A., University of Nanking; Ph.D., 
University of Chicago. 

THEODORE R. KIMPTON, Assistant 

Professor of Foreign Language Emeritus. 

(1965-1974). 

B.S., United States Military Academy; 

M.A., University of Maryland; Catholic 

University; Laval University. 

DOROTHY HUESTIS, Assistant 

Professor of Education Emeritus. 

(1969-1976). 

B.A., M.A., Indiana University. 

CHARLES E. HALT, Professor of 
Economics Emeritus. (1969-1977). 
B.S., Slippery Rock State College; M.Ed., 
Pennsylvania State University; Ph.D., 
Syracuse University; University of 
Pittsburgh. 

Professors 

HELEN LOUISE McGUFFIE , Professor 
of English. (1947). 

B.A. Bethany College; M.A., University of 
Pittsburgh; Ph.D., Columbia University; 
Oxford University. 

J. DANIEL DRAPER, Professor of 

Chemistry and Head of the Department. 

(1951). 

B.S., Franklin and Marshall College; 

Ph.D., University of Maryland; Michigan 

State University. 

JOHN R. TAYLOR, Professor of English 
and Head of the Department of Fine Arts. 
(1955). 

B.A., Bethany College; M.A., Princeton 
University; University of Akron; 
University of Kansas; University of 
Birmingham, England; University of 
Edinburgh; Oxford University. 

JAMES W. CARTY, JR., Professor of 
Communications. (1959). 
B.A., Culver-Stockton; B.D., University of 
Chicago; M.S., Northwestern University; 
University of Oklahoma; George Peabody 
College; Scaritt College; Saltillo (Mexico) 
State Teachers College; Diploma from 
National University of Nicaragua; Diploma 
from University of San Carlos; Ohio 
University; University of Denver; 
Universidad Iberoamericana. 



RICHARD B. KENNEY, T. W. Phillips 
Professor of Old Testament Literature and 
Head of the Department of Religious 
Studies. (1964). 

B.A., Washington University; B.D., M.A., 
Ph.D., Yale University; Basel University; 
McGill University; University of Tubingen; 
The University of Chicago. 

ROBERT E. MYERS, Professor of 

Philosophy and Head of the Department. 

(1964). 

B.A., Bethany College; B.D., Texas 

Christian University; Ph.D., Ohio State 

University. 

GARY E. LARSON, Professor of Biology 
and Head of the Department. (1964). 
B.S., M.S., New York State University, 
Albany; Ph.D., Rutgers University; Albany 
Medical College. 

HIRAM J. LESTER, Professor of 
Religious Studies and Director of 
Development. (1965). 

Johnson Bible College; B.A., B.D., Phillips 
University; M.A., Ph.D., Yale University. 

STANLEY L. BECKER, Professor of 
General Science. (1968). 
B.S., New York State College of Forestry; 
Ph.D., University of Wisconsin. 

J. TREVOR PEIRCE, Professor of 

Psychology and Head of the Department. 

(1969). 

B.A., Princeton University; Ph.D., 

University of California. 

BURTON B. THURSTON, Professor of 
Middle Eastern Studies. (1970). 
B.Th., Northwest Christian College; B.A., 
Transylvania University; B.D., Butler 
School of Religion; M.A., Butler 
University; Th.D., Harvard University; 
University of Chicago; New York 
University; University of Tubingen. 



127 



Associate Professors 

WILLIAM L. YOUNG, Associate Professor 
of History and Political Science and Head 
of the Department. (1950). 
B.A., Bethany College; M.A., Ohio State 
University; Columbia University. 

JAMES E. ALLISON, Associate Professor 

of Mathematics and Head of the 

Department. (1964). 

B.S., Bethany College; M.A., West 

Virginia University; Texas Christian 

University. 

JOHN W. LOZIER, Associate Professor of 
History. (1964). 

B.A., University of Colorado; M.A., Ph.D., 
The Ohio State University. 

JOHN D. DAVIS, Associate Professor of 
Economics and Business. (1965). 
B.A., American International College; 
M.A., University of Connecticut; West 
Virginia University; University of Chicago. 

JOHN U. DAVIS, Associate Professor of 
Education. (1966). 
B.A., Bethany College; M.A., Ed.D., 
Columbia University; University of 
Nebraska; Oxford University; West 
Virginia University. 

W. RANDOLPH COOEY, Associate 

Professor of Economics and Business. 

(1966). 

B.A., Bethany College; M.A., West 

Virginia University; Mississippi State 

University. 

DAVID J. JUDY, Associate Professor of 
English and Theatre and Head of the 
Department of Theatre. (1967). 
B.A., Denison University; M.A., Western 
Reserve; Ph.D., West Virginia University; 
University of Mexico; Oxford University 



WESLEY J. WAGNER, Associate 
Professor of Art. (1967). Pennsylvania 
Academy of the Fine Arts; Barnes 
Foundation. 

ALBERT R. BUCKELEW, JR., Associate 
Professor of Biology. (1969). 
B.S., Fairleigh Dickinson University; 
Ph.D., University of New Hampshire. 

RICHARD G. STEBBINS, Associate 
Professor of Chemistry. (1969). 
B.A., Wesleyan University; Ph.D., Texas 
A&M University. 

LEONORA BALLA CAYARD, Associate 
Professor of Foreign Languages and Head 
of the Department. (1970). 
Ph.D., Marburg University; Yale 
University. 

LARRY E. GRIMES, Associate Professor 
of English. Head of the Department, and 
Director of Liberal Studies. (1970). 
B.A., Bethany College; B.D., Yale Divinity 
School; Ph.D., Emory University. 

PAULINE R. NELSON, Associate 
Professor of Foreign Languages. (1971). 
B.A., Upsala College; M.A., Ph.D., 
University of Pittsburgh. 

DAVID T. BROWN, Associate Professor of 

Mathematics. (1974). 

B.A., Ottowa University; M.A., Ph.D., 

Syracuse University; University of 

Pittsburgh. 

T. GALE THOMPSON, Associate 

Professor of Psychology. (1974). 

B.A., M.A., Ph.D., University of Missouri. 

DAVID M. HUTTER, Associate Professor 
of Physical Education and Head of the 
Department. (1976). 
B.S., M.S., Ohio University; Ph.D., The 
Ohio State University. 

MILTON R. SMITH, JR., Associate 
Professor of Chemistry. (1972). 
B.S., Sul Ross State University; Ph.D., 
Texas A&M University; The Ohio State 
University. 

LYNN ADKINS Associate Professor of 

Sociology and Social Work and Head of the 

Department. (1978). 

A.B., Marshall University; M.S.W., West 

Virginia University; Ph.D., University of 

Pittsburgh. 

ANN C. SHELLY, Associate Professor of 

Education, Head of the Department and 

Director of Teacher Preparation 

Programs. (1978). 

B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Michigan State 

University. 



EDWIN GOLDIN, Associate Professor of 

Physics and Head of the Department. 

(1981). 

B.A., Temple University; M.S., Ph.D., 

Polytechnic Institute of New York. 

PAUL CHRISTOPHER SMITH, Associate 
Professor of Foreign Languages. (1981). 
B.A., University of Arizona; M.A., Ph.D., 
Arizona State University. 

WILLIAM C. PAVORD, Associate 
Professor of Economics and Business and 
Head of the Department. (1981). 
B.S., Pennsylvania State University; 
M.B.A., Ph.D., The Ohio State University. 

Assistant Professors 

ALBERT R. DeVAUL, Assistant Professor 
of Music and Program Director. (1964). 
B.A., West Liberty State College; M.M., 
West Virginia University; Carnegie-Mellon 
University. 

ANTHONY L. MITCH, Assistant 
Professor of English. (1967). 
B.A. Cornell University; M.A., St. John's 
University; New York University. 

E. DONALD AULT, Assistant Professor of 
Physical Education. (1968). 
> B.A., West Liberty State College; M.A., 
Marshall University. 

WALTER L. KORNOWSKI, Assistant 
Professor of Art and Head of the 
Department. (1968). 

B.F.A., Rochester Institute of Technology; 
M.S., State University College of Buffalo; 
M.F.A., West Virginia University. 

NANCY SANDERCOX, Head Librarian. 

(1971.) 

B.A., Bethany College; M.L.S., University 

of Pittsburgh. 

RICK P. WILLIAMSON, Assistant 
Professor of Education Media and 
Director of the Media Center. (1975). 
B.A., M.A., University of South Dakota; 
Ed.D., West Virginia University. 

JAMES E. DAFLER, Assistant Professor 
of Physical Education. (1976). 
B.A., Capital University; M.Ed., Ohio 
University; Marietta College. 



128 



JOHN H. HULL, Assistant Professor of 
Psychology. (1976). 

B.S., Alma College; M.A., Ph.D., Kent 
State University. 

WILLIAM P. CROSBIE, Assistant 
Professor of Music and Head of the 
Department. (1977). 
A.B., Whittier College; M.M., D.M.A., 
West Virginia University. 

JAMES J. HUMES, Assistant Professor of 

Communications. (1977). 

B.A., Geneva College; M.A., West Virginia 

University. 

SALLY I. DOR WART, Assistant Professor 
of Physical Education and Coordinator of 
Women's Athletics. (1977). 
B.S., M.S., West Virginia University. 

DELLA W. SHELDON, Assistant 

Professor of History and Political Science. 

(1978). 

B.A., Sacramento State University; Ph.D., 

Claremont Graduate School. 

PAUL E. DISS, JR., Assistant Professor 
of Sociology and Social Work. (1980). 
A.B. Wheeling College; M.S.W., Fordham 
University; New York Center for 
Psychoanalytic Training. 

FRANK GERALD DILLASHAW, 

Assistant Professor of Education. (1980). 
B.S., Furman University; M.A.T., 
Converse College; Ed.D., University of 
Georgia. 

MARC A. OLSHAN, Assistant Professor 
of Sociology and Social Work. (1981). 
B.S., Cornell University; M.A., Columbia 
University; Ph.D., Cornell University. 

BONNIE BOWMAN THURSTON, 
Assistant Professor of English and 
Humanities. (1981). 
B.A., Bethany College; M.A., Ph.D., 
University of Virginia. 

YAO-TANG LIAO, Assistant Professor of 
Physics and Computer Science. (1981). 
B.S., National Cheng-Kung University, 
Taiwan; M.S., Ph.D., University of 
New Mexico. 



DAVID L. BOLENDER, Visiting 
Assistant Professor of Biology. (1981). 
B.S., Bethany College; Ph.D., West 
Virginia University. 

HAROLD M. CURNUTTE, Assistant 

Professor of Economics and Business. 

(1981). 

B.A., M.S., Ohio University. 

ALBERT DAVID SIL, Visiting Assistant 
Professor of Mathematics. (1981). 
B.A., John Carroll University; M.A., 
Duquesne University; M.A., University of 
Illinois. 

Instructors 

BARBARA L. BOYER, Instructor in 

Communications. (1979). 

B.A., Hastings College; M.A., Marshall 

University. 

KURT P. DUDT, Instructor in 
Communications. (1979). 
B.S., M.S., Clarion State College; 
University of Pittsburgh. 

MICHAEL WESCOTT LODER, 

Instructor in Library Sciences and 

Assistant Librarian for Public Services. 

(1980). 

B.A., Union College (N.Y); M.S., M.L.S., 

University of Oregon. 

MARY ELLEN FISKE, Instructor in 
Physical Education. (1980). 
B.S., Southern Connecticut State College; 
M.S., Florida International University. 

JOHN J. MCGOWAN, Instructor of 

Physical Education. (1980). 

B.S., Manhattan College; M.S., Springfield 

College. 

Adjunct Faculty and Lecturers 

ROBYN R. COLE, Lecturer in English. 

(1968). 

B.A., University of Maryland; M.A., 

University of Georgia; Ohio University. 

WILLIAM B. ALLEN, Chaplain of the 
College. (1970). 

B.A., Bethany College; M.Div., Yale 
Divinity School; D.Min., School of 
Theology at Claremont. 

OLIVER MANNING, Artist in Residence. 

(1972). 

B.M., Louisiana State College; M.M., 

Cincinnati College - Conservatory of 

Music. 

RUTH WESTLAKE, Lecturer in 
Communications. (1975). 
B.A., Kent State University; Ohio 
University. 



DANIEL M. LOWY, Lecturer in Religious 
Studies. (1979). 

A.B., New York University; M.H.L., 
Hebrew Union College (New York); D.D., 
Hebrew Union College (Cincinnati). 

JENNIFER COFFIELD, Lecturer in 
Theatre. (1980). 

B.F.A., West Virginia University; M.A., 
Southern Illinois University. 

RYLAND W. CRARY, Historian-in- 

Residence. (1980). 

A.B., M.A., Ph.D., State University of 

Iowa. 

LAWRENCE D. ROMBOSKI, Lecturer in 
Computer Science. (1980). 
B.A., Washington and Jefferson College; 
M.A., M.S., Ph.D., Rutgers University. 

DAVID A. ADAMSON, Lecturer in 

Accounting. (1980). 

M.S., M.B.A., University of Pittsburgh. 

JEFFREY SCOTT NUGENT, Lecturer in 

Music. (1980). 

B.A., West Liberty State College. 

DOMINICK A. DEFILIPPIS, Lecturer in 

Foreign Languages. (1981). 

B.A., Georgetown University; M.A., 

New York University; Ph.D., University of 

Pittsburgh. 

PETER WEST, Lecturer in Art. (1981). 
B.F.A., Tyler School of Art, Temple 
University; M.F.A., Ohio University. 



129 



Faculty Committees and Boards 

Student members are appointed annually 
to many of the following committees and 
boards by the President of the College 
and upon the recommendation of the 
Student Board of Governors. 

ADMISSION 

Richard B. Kenney, Convener; James E. 
Allison, John S. Cunningham, James E. 
Dafler, John D. Davis, David J. Judy, 
Pauline R. Nelson, Milton R. Smith, Jr., 
David J. Wottle. 

ATHLETICS 

Albert R. DeVaul, Convener; E. Donald 
Ault, J. U. Davis, Sally I. Dorwart, 
David M. Hutter (ex officio), Wesley J. 
Wagner. 

BOARD OF COMMUNICATIONS 

Barbara L. Boyer, James W. Carty, Jr., 
John U. Davis, Kurt P. Dudt, John A. 
Graham, James J. Humes, David J. Judy, 
Ruth L. Westlake. Students: Editors and 
Business Managers of publications, 
Student Managers of WVBC-FM and 
Channel 3-TV. The President of the 
Student Board of Governors serves as 
Convener of the Board. 

CAREER ADVISEMENT 

John S. Cunningham, Convener; Lynn 
Adkins, Barbara L. Boyer, Leonora B. 
Cayard, William P. Crosbie, James E. 
Dafler, Paul E. Diss, Jr., John W. Lozier, 
Anthony L. Mitch, Robert E. Myers, J. 
Trevor Peirce, Delia W. Sheldon, Richard 
G. Stebbins, William L. Young. 

COLLEGE ACTIVITIES 

David M. Hutter, Convener; Barbara L. 
Boyer, William P. Crosbie, Albert R. 
DeVaul, Sally I. Dorwart, Mary Ellen 
Fiske, James J. Humes, Walter L. 
Kornowski, Michael Wescott Loder, Joseph 
B. McGraw, Darline B. Nicholson, John R. 
Taylor, Wesley J. Wagner. 

COMPUTER ADVISORY 

Edwin Goldin, Convener; James E. Allison, 
David T. Brown, F. Gerald Dillashaw, John 
A. Graham, Joseph M. Kurey, John J. 
McGowan, J. Trevor Peirce, Lynn Queen, 
Milton R. Smith, Jr. 

CURRICULUM 

Wm. Daniel Cobb, Convener; James E. 
Allison, John D. Davis, Larry E. Grimes, 
David M. Hutter, Joseph M. Kurey, 
Hiram J. Lester (ex officio), Robert E. 
Myers, Nancy Sandercox, Ann C. Shelly, 
Richard G. Stebbins, Rick P. Williamson. 



EXTERNAL EDUCATION 

Lynn Adkins, Convener; Gary P. Armitage, 
W. Randolph Cooey, Kurt P. Dudt, John A. 
Graham, Walter L. Kornowski, Joseph M. 
Kurey, Hiram J. Lester, Robert Sandercox, 
Ann C. Shelly, Rick Williamson. 

FACULTY BUDGET 

Stanley S. Becker, Physical and Life 
Sciences (1983); David M. Hutter, At-Large 
(1984); Anthony L. Mitch, Humanities 
(1983); Ann C. Shelly, Social Sciences 
(1982); James E. Allison, Representative to 
the Board of Trustees. 

FACULTY DEVELOPMENT 

J. Trevor Pierce, Convener; E. Donald 
Ault, Stanley L. Becker, William P. 
Crosbie, F. Gerald Dillashaw, James J. 
Humes, Michael Wescott Loder, John J. 
McGowan, T. Gale Thompson. 

FACULTY PERSONNEL 

Milton Smith, Jr., At-Large (1982); John D. 
Davis, Social Sciences (1982); Pauline R. 
Nelson, Humanities (1983); James E. 
Allison, At-Large (1983); John H. Hull, 
Physical and Life Sciences (1984). 

FACULTY WELFARE 

W. Randolph Cooey (1982); Pauline R. 
Nelson (1982); John H. Hull (1983); Sally I. 
Dorwart (1983); Stanley L. Becker (1984); 
Gary E. Larson (1984). 

GANS AWARD 

J. Daniel Draper, Convener; Albert R. 
Buckelew, Edwin Goldin, John H. Hull, 
Gary E. Larson, J. Trevor Peirce, 
Milton R. Smith, Jr. 

HONORS 

Robert E. Myers, Convener; James W. 
Carty, Jr., John S. Cunningham, J. Daniel 
Draper, Richard B. Kenney, Robert A. 
Sandercox, John R. Taylor, T. Gale 
Thompson, Burton B. Thurston, William L. 
Young. 

INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES 

Larry E. Grimes, Convener; James E. 
Allison, Stanley L. Becker, Kurt P. Dudt, 
T. Gale Thompson, Bonnie B. Thurston, 
Burton B. Thurston. 

INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION 

Pauline R. Nelson, Convener; Leonora B. 
Cayard (ex officio), James W. Carty, Jr., 
W. Randolph Cooey, Gary E. Larson, 
John W. Lozier, Delia W. Sheldon, Paul C. 
Smith, Burton B. Thurston. 

ORIENTATION 

Richard B. Kenney, Convener; William B. 
Allen, William P. Crosbie, John S. 



Cunningham, James E. Dafler, Larry E. 
Grimes, Michael Wescott Loder, Joseph B. 
McGraw, Anthony Mitch, Nancy 
Sandercox, T. Gale Thompson, David J. 
Wottle. 

POLICY APPEALS 

Joseph M. Kurey, Convener; Albert R. 
Buckelew, Wm. Daniel Cobb, W. Randolph 
Cooey, John S. Cunningham, Richard B. 
Kenney, John J. McGowan, Milton 
Smith, Jr. 

PRACTICUM REVIEW 

John H. Hull, Convener; David T. Brown, 
Leonora B. Cayard, F. Gerald Dillashaw, 
Paul E. Diss, Jr., Sally I. Dorwart, Kurt P. 
Dudt, Larry E. Grimes, David J. Judy. 

RELIGIOUS LIFE 

Burton B. Thurston, Convener; William B. 
Allen, James W. Carty, Jr., Paul E. Diss, 
Jr., John C. Giesmann, Richard B. Kenney, 
Daniel M. Lowy, John R. Taylor, Wesley J. 
Wagner. 

STUDENT LIFE 

John S. Cunningham, Convener; E. Donald 
Ault, John U. Davis, Paul E. Diss, Jr., 
Mary Ellen Fiske, John H. Hull, David M. 
Hutter; Ex officio members: John C. 
Giesmann, Larry E. Grimes, Joseph 
McGraw, Darline B. Nicholson, Joanne 
Sykes. 

TEACHER EDUCATION 

Pauline R. Nelson, Convener; Lynn 
Adkins, David T. Brown, Ryland W. Crary, 
Albert R. DeVaul, David M. Hutter, 
David J. Judy, Walter L. Kornowski, 
Ann C. Shelly. 

COLLEGE COUNCIL AND 
FACULTY SENATE 

The College Council advises the president 
of the College on matters of student 
relations and the impact of policies and 
practices on student life. Its membership is 
comprised of senior administration and 
faculty who are designated by the 
president, and of presidents of fraternities, 
sororities and house associations. The 
Dean of Students chairs the council. 

The Faculty Senate discusses issues 
regarding the educational programs of the 
College and advises the president of 
academic concerns. Membership includes 
all department heads, full professors, 
executive officers, and three other elected 
faculty members. The Dean of Faculty is 
president of the Senate. 



130 



Index 



A 

Academic Advisor 40 

Academic Common Market 44 

Academic Program 39 

Accreditation and Memberships, 

Bethany College 5 

Administrative Officers 126 

Admission 25 

Admission Office Hours 27 

Advanced Placement 27 

Application for Admission 25 

Application for 

Readmission 29 

Community/ Junior 

College Graduates 27 

Early Admission 27 

Foreign Students 27 

High School Preparation 25 

Interviews 27 

Transfer Students 27 

Advisors 18 

Career Interests 18 

Freshmen 18 

Senior 18 

Special Services 18 

Allied Health Professions 18 

Alumni Council 125 

Alumni Field House 7 

American History, 

Course in 90 

Anthropology 119 

Applied Music, Courses in 99 

Arabic, Courses in 86 

Art, Courses in 53 

Assets of College, Value of 6 

Athletics 16 

Awards 21 

B 

Band 15 

Benedum Commons 7 

Bethany House 7 

Bethany Plan 39 

Bethany Profile 5 

Biology, Courses in 56 

Board, Costof 29 

Board of Communications 15 

Board of Fellows 124 

Board of Trustees 123 

Board of Visitors 125 

Buildings 6 

Business Administration 19 

C 

Cable 3 15 

Calendar 2, 40 



Campbell Hall 7 

Certification, Elementary and 

Secondary Education 73 

Chamber Music 15 

Change of Schedule 48 

Changes in Regulations 49 

Chemistry, Courses in 58 

Chemistry, Professional 

Preparation for 19 

Choir, Brass 15 

Choir, Concert 15 

Class Attendance Policy 48 

Classification of Students 48 

Cochran Hall 7 

College Life 13 

Columbia University 

Combined Plan 44 

Commencement Hall 6 

Committee on Admission 25 

Committees: Board of 

Trustees 124 

Committees: Faculty, Staff 

and Students 130 

Communications, 

Courses in 60 

Comprehensive Charges 29 

Computer Science, 

Courses in 63 

Cooperative U.S. Study 

Offerings 44 

Contents, Table of 3 

Continuing Education Program 46 

Counseling 17 

Course Descriptions 51 

Course Load 47 

Course Offerings, 

Scheduleof 49 

CrambletHall 7 

Cross-Listed Courses, 

Policy on 47 

Cultural Activities 14 

Curriculum 6 

D 

Dean of Faculty 126 

Dean of Students 126 

Dean's List 19 

Dentistry 18 

Designated Scholarships 35 

Directories 123 

Distribution Requirement 41 

Drawing Account, Student 31 

E 

Economics and Business, 

Courses in 65 

Education, Courses in 68 

Elementary Education 69 

Endowment Fund, Value of 6 

Engineering 19 

Engineering Programs 44 

English, Courses in 76 



Enrollment 5 

European and World 

History 90 

External Trust 

Scholarships 37 

F 

Facilities and Equipment, 

Valueof 6 

Faculty, Listof 126 

Fees 29 

Admission 29 

Art , 30 

Board 29 

Breakage 30 

Matriculation 29 

Music 30 

Overseas Programs 30 

Readmission 29 

Registration Deposit 29 

Room 29 

Special 30 

Tuition 29 

Field of Concentration 42 

Financial Aid 31 

Financial Assistance, 

Officeof 32 

Fine Arts, Courses in 81 

Foreign Language, 

Courses in 83 

Foreign Students, 

Admission of 27 

Fraternities 14 

French, Courses in 83 

Freshman Interdisciplinary 

Lecture Courses 51 

Freshman Seminars 51 

Freshman Studies 
Program 40, 51 

G 

General Scholarships 32 

General Sciences, 

Courses in 87 

Geography, Courses in 88 

Georgia Tech Dual- 
Degree Program 44 

German, Courses in 84 

Goals, Bethany College 6 

Government, Student 13 

Grading System 48 

Graduation Honors 19 

Graduation Requirements 40 

Greek, Course in 86 

Graphic Design, 

Courses in 55 

Gresham House 7 



131 



H 

Harder Hall 7 

HarlanHall 10 

Health Science 88 

Health Services 16 

Heuristics 88 

History, Bethany College 5 

History and Political Science, 

Courses in 89 

Honor Societies 20 

Housing 13 

I 

Independent Studies 44 

Infirmary 16 

Interdisciplinary Studies 93 

Interdisciplinary Lecture 

Courses 51 

Internships, Policy on 43 

Intramurals 16 

Invalidation of Credits 49 

Irvin Gymnasium 7 

J 

January Term 44 

Junior/Community College 
Graduates, Admission of 27 

K 

Knight Natatorium 7 

L 

Law 18 

Leadership Center 7,46 

Leisure Studies , 104 

Library 10, 94 

Literature and Theory of 

Music, Courses in 97 

Loan Funds 37 

Location, Bethany College 5 

M 

Madrid Study Program 46 

Map of the Area 4 

Map of the Campus 8, 9 

Mathematics, Courses in 95 

McEachern Hall 

Refer to Campus Map 
McLean Hall 8, 9 

Refer to Campus Map 

Media Center 10 

Medicine 18 

Middle Childhood 

Education 70 

Monthly Payment Plans 31 

Morlan Hall 10 

Music 15 

Music, Courses in 97 

Musical Organizations 15 



O 

Oglebay Hall 7 

Old Main 6 

Overseas Study Programs 46 

Oxford Semester 46 

P 

Parents' Confidential 

Statement 31 

Paris Sorbonne Program 46 

Pendleton Heights 6 

Phillips Hall 10 

Phillips Memorial Library 10 

Philosophy, Courses in 101 

Physical Education and 

Health, Courses in 103 

Physics, Courses in 108 

Placement 17 

Policy Appeals Board 40 

Political Science, Courses in 91 

Practicum Program 41 

Pre-Professional Studies 18 

Allied Health Professions 18 

Professional Chemistry 19 

Pre-Engineering 19 

Pre-Law 18 

Pre-Theological 19 

Social Work 19 

Teacher Education 19 

Professional Core Program 18 

President 126 

Probation 49 

Professional Block 72 

Psychology, Courses in Ill 

Publications, Student 15 

R 

Radio Station 15 

Refunds 29 

Registration Deposit 29 

Regulations, Student 13 

Religious Life 17 

Religious Studies, 

Courses in 114 

Renner Union 7 

Residence Life 13 

Residence Halls 10 

Residence Requirement 44 

Richardson Hall of Science 7 

Room and Board, Cost of 29 



S 

Scholarships, Named 32 

Scholarships, Qualifications 

for 32 

Secondary Education 71 

Senior Comprehensive 

Examination 43 

Senior Fellowships 20 

Senior Project 42 

Social Life 14 

Social Sciences, Courses in 117 

Social Work Education 19 

Sociology and Social Work 

Courses in 118 

Sororities 14 

Spanish, Courses in 85 

Special Examinations 49 

Steinman Fine Arts Center 7 

Student Accounts, 

Payment of 31 

Summer Programming 47 

Summer Terms 44 

Sustained Awards 37 

T 

Teacher Education, 

Admission to 72 

Teacher Education 

Requirements 68 

Television Station 15 

Theatre, Courses in 121 

Theatrical Productions 15 

Transfer Students, 

Admission of 27 

Transcript of Records 49 

Treasurer 126 

Tubingen Study Program 46 

Tuition, Costof 29 

V 

Volunteers in Action 14 

W 

Washington Semester 45 

Washington University 

Three-Two Plan 44 

Withdrawals 29, 43, 49 

Work Internships, 

Policy on 43 

Writing Proficiency 

Program 77 

Writing Proficiency 

Requirement 42 

WVBC-FM 15 



132 



^econa uass i'< 



Bethany, 










College Bulletin 1982 - 1983 




Aueust 1982 




Bethany 

College 

Bulletin 

1982-1983 



Vol. LXXV No. 3 
August 1982 
(USPS 052-420) 

Second class postage paid at Bethany, 
West Virginia, 26032. Published five 
times a year, February, April, July, 
August and October, by Bethany 
College, Bethany, West Virginia. 



Notice of Nondiscriminatory Policy 

Bethany College admits students of any 
race, color, sex, religion, handicaps, 
and national or ethnic origin to all of 
the rights, privileges, programs, and 
activities generally accorded or made 
available to students at the school. 
Bethany does not discriminate on the 
basis of race, color, sex, religion, and 
national or ethnic origin in the 
administration of its educational 
policies, admissions policies, 
scholarship and loan programs, athletic 
activities, or other school-administered 
programs. 



College 
Calendar 

1982-1983 

First Semester 



August 

29-30 Sunday-Monday 

Orientation and evaluation for new students 
31 Tuesday 

Registration 

September 

1 Wednesday 

Classes begin for all students 

7 Tuesday 
Last day for re-adjustment of schedules 
without academic and financial penalty; last 
day to add a course 

9 Thursday 
Formal Convocation 
14 Tuesday 
Last day to determine credit/no credit 

October 

2 Saturday 

Homecoming 

16 Saturday 

Parents' Day 

19 Tuesday 

Last day of classes for first-half of semester 

19-20 Tuesday-Wednesday 

Final exams for first-half semester courses 

22 Friday 

Mid-term grades due 



November 

1 Monday 

Writing Qualification Test for Freshmen 
Seminars 

13 Saturday 

Board of Trustees meeting 
15-19 Monday-Friday 
Registration for second semester 
19 Friday 4 p.m. 
Thanksgiving vacation begins 
29 Monday 8 a.m. 
Thanksgiving vacation ends 

December 

14 Tuesday 

Last day of first-semester classes 

15 Wednesday 
Reading Day 

16-18 Thursday-Saturday 

Final exam period 
27 Monday 

Final grades due 

January Term (January 3-28) 

January 

24-25 Monday-Tuesday 

Senior Comprehensive Exams (Written) 
26-29 Wednesday-Saturday 

Senior Comprehensive Exams (Oral) 



Second Semester 

January 

30 Sunday 

Registration for all students and Diagnostic 
Writing Test for all transfers and 
readmissions 

31 Monday 

Classes begin for all students 

February 
4 Friday 

Last day for re-adjustment of schedules 
without academic and financial penalty; last 
day to add a course 

10 Thursday 
Formal Convocation 

11 Friday 

Last day to determine credit/no credit 

March 
3 Thursday 

Founder's Day 
10 Thursday 

Writing Qualification Test 

(Sophomores and Juniors) 
16-17 Wednesday -Thursday 

Final exams for first-half semester courses 



18 Friday 

Last day of classes for first-half semester 
courses 

22 Tuesday 
Mid-term grades due 
25 Friday 4 p.m. 
Spring vacation begins 

April 
5 Tuesday 8 a.m. 

Spring vacation ends 
11-15 Monday-Friday 

Registration for first semester 1983-84 

14 Thursday 
Honors Day 

30 Saturday 8 a.m. 

Reading period for seniors 

May 
2 Monday 

Grades due for seniors taking comps 

9-10 Monday-Tuesday 

Senior Comprehensives (Written) 

11-14 Wednesday-Saturday 

Senior Comprehensives (Oral) 

13 Friday 

Grades due for seniors who took comps in 

January 

15 Saturday 
Alumni Day 

16 Monday 

Last day of second-semester classes 
17-19 Tuesday-Thursday 
Final exam period 

19 Thursday 1 p.m. 
Final Faculty meeting 

20 Friday 

Board of Trustees meeting 

20 Friday 8 p.m. 
Baccalaureate Service 

21 Saturday 10 a.m. 
Commencement 

23 Monday 
Final grades due 




Table of 
Contents 



Bethany Profile 


5 


College Life 


13 


Admission 


25 


Expenses and Financial Aid 


29 


Academic Program 


39 


Course Descriptions 


51 


The Directories 


123 


Index 


131 



f 




Bethany 
Profile 

History 

Bethany was established as a private 
educational foundation, chartered 
under the laws of then undivided 
Commonwealth of Virginia on March 2, 
1840, more than two decades before 
West Virginia became a state. The 
charter was written by Alexander 
Campbell, a celebrated debater, 
Christian reformer, and educator, who 
not only provided land for the campus 
and $15,000 toward the first building, 
but also served as Bethany's first 
president until his death in 1866. 

Bethany's traditions are derived from 
the University of Glasgow in Scotland, 
where Campbell studied before coming 
to America in 1809, and from the 
University of Virginia, from which 
Campbell gleaned much of the College's 
original curriculum and faculty. 

Since its inception, Bethany has 
remained a four-year private college 
affiliated with the Christian Church 
(Disciples of Christ). This religious 
body, of which Campbell was one of the 
principal founders, continues to support 
and encourage Bethany, though it 
exercises no sectarian control. 




Location 



Bethany is located in the northern 
panhandle of West Virginia, a narrow 
tip of land between Ohio and 
Pennsylvania. This special location in 
the rolling foothills of the Allegheny 
Mountains puts Bethany near several 
large cities. To the northeast, just 50 
miles away, is the major urban and 
cultural center of Pittsburgh. Fifteen 
miles to the southwest is Wheeling, W. 
Va., the dominant northern city in the 
state and location of Oglebay Park, one 
of the nation's best-known summer and 
winter resorts. 



Accreditation and 
Memberships 

• North Central Association of 
Colleges and Secondary Schools 

• Association of American Colleges 

• American Council on Education 

• College Entrance Examination 
Board 

• American Association of Colleges for 
Teacher Education 

• National Council for the 
Accreditation of Teacher Education 

• National Association of Independent 
Colleges and Universities 

• Division of Higher Education of the 
Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) 

• Women graduates are eligible for 
membership in the American 
Association of University Women. 



Enrollment 



Each year Bethany students - 
approximately 475 men and 400 women 
- represent some 32 states and 15 
foreign countries. The majority come 
from Pennsylvania, New Jersey, New 
York, Ohio, Connecticut, Maryland, and 
West Virginia. Nearly 85 per cent of the 
student body is from out-of-state. 




Curriculum 



Goals 



The Bethany Plan is designed to 
encourage intellectual and personal 
excellence within the framework of a 
caring academic community. It aims at 
the development of the individual's 
abilities for intelligent leadership, public 
concern and service, effective 
communication, and professional 
competence in a technological age. 

To these ends, the Plan stresses the 
importance of gaining informed 
perspectives on the world that will 
enhance the individual's systematic, 
ethical, and integrative capacities. This 
is accomplished through both commonly 
required and individually elected 
programs designed by the student in 
consultation with a faculty advisor. The 
Plan provides for a close student- 
faculty relationship within which the 
individual helps develop an educational 
program to satisfy his or her personal 
goals. 

In addition, the Bethany Plan includes 
not only a classroom-based program but 
an experience-based program as well. 
This is a recognition that the classroom 
is not the only place for meaningful 
education. Pages 39-49 discuss the 
curriculum in detail. 



Bethany College is a private, four-year, 
church-related but autonomous, co- 
educational, residential, liberal arts 
college with a tradition of an innovative 
and quality educational program. 
Bethany emphasizes critical reason and 
the religious dimension of life, 
community experience and the 
importance of the individual, ethical 
responsibility and the satisfactions of 
personal accomplishments, the 
integration of the total person, and the 
value of a life of work and service to 
others. 

The educational program is designed to 
help each Bethany student realize seven 
goals: 

1) to discover how to acquire, evaluate, 
and use knowledge 

2) to master the skills of communication 

3) to cooperate and collaborate with 
others in study, analysis, and 
formulation of solutions to problems 

4) to understand contemporary issues 
and events 

5) to analyze personal values, to 
perceive and to deal sympathetically 
with the values of others, and to be 
open to the continued evaluation of both 

6) to make progress toward the 
selection of and the preparation for a 
vocation 

7) to integrate the varied experiences of 
life and to see the relationship of the 
college experience to future 
development as a responsible citizen. 



Educational 
Resources 

Substantial resources are invested in 
the education of Bethany students. The 
gross assets of the College on June 30, 
1981, totaled $35,052,500. Facilities and 
equipment at book value were 
$19,478,830, with a replacement value 
of approximately $46,500,000. The 
market value of all endowment funds 
was $15,300,000. 

More than 30 academic, administrative, 
and residential buildings are on 
Bethany's campus. 

Pendleton Heights (1841) was built 
during the college's first year by W. K. 
Pendleton, a member of the first faculty 
and second president of the College. 
Today it serves as home for Bethany's 
president. Pendleton Heights is listed in 
the "National Register of Historic 
Places." 

Old Main (1858) is the central unit of 
Bethany's academic buildings. Its tower 
dominates the campus and is the chief 
architectural feature noted as one 
approaches the College. Old Main is 
listed in the "National Register of 
Historic Places." The building is one of 
the earliest examples of collegiate 
Gothic architecture in the United 
States, and is in the process of 
restoration. 

Commencement Hall (1872) provides 
the setting for convocations, concerts, 
lectures, dramatic presentations, and 
other gatherings. Studios and 



classrooms for the art department 
occupy the ground floor of the building. 
It was remodeled in 1924. 

Cramblet Hall (1905) was constructed 
through a gift from Andrew Carnegie. 
Originally the library, it was remodeled 
in 1961 to house Bethany's 
administrative offices. It is named in 
honor of two presidents of the College, 
Thomas E. Cramblet and his son, 
Wilbur. 

Cochran Hall (1910) was built as a 
men's residence by Mark M. Cochran of 
the class of 1875. The interior of the 
building was completely remodeled 
during 1974-75 to serve as a faculty 
office and student conference center. 
Today it houses eight academic 
departments of the College and several 
administrative offices. 

Oglebay Hall (1912) a gift of Earl W. 
Oglebay of the class of 1869, 
accommodates the laboratories and 
classrooms for the biology and 
psychology departments. 

Irvin Gymnasium (1919) a gift of the 
Irvin family of Big Run, Pa., serves as a 
recreation center for the campus. It 
contains a modern dance studio. 

Renner Union-Bethany House (1948) is 
the student union. Here are found the 
campus radio station, the college 
bookstore, a student photographic 
darkroom, music listening rooms, a 
spacious lounge, and the Admission 
Office. The alumni joined in 1969 with 
the R. R. Renner family of Cleveland, 
Ohio, to remodel this facility. 



Alumni Field House (1948) provides 
physical education facilities for men and 
women. It is also used for concerts. 
Adjacent to the field house are football 
and baseball fields, tennis courts, and a 
quarter-mile track. 

Richardson Hall of Science (1964) 
provides facilities for the chemistry, 
physics, and mathematics departments 
and houses the computer center. It is 
named for Robert Richardson, 
Bethany's first science professor. 

John J. Knight Natatorium (1967) 
contains a six-lane, 25-yard, heated pool 
which is used in the physical education 
program and for intercollegiate 
competition. It is named for John J. 
Knight, long-time director of athletics. 
Four tennis courts are located next to 
the natatorium. 




David and Irene Steinman Fine Arts 
Center (1969) houses the education, 
music, and theatre departments. A 
fully-equipped theatre occupies the 
central portion of the building. The 
music department consists of teaching 
studios, studio-classrooms, a general 
rehearsal room for the larger choral 
and instrumental groups, and individual 
practice rooms. 

Leadership Center (1972) is the world's 
first solarized satellite receiving center 
and houses offices, seminar rooms, 
exhibition areas, and a 123-seat circular 
conference room for continuing 
education activities. The center offers a 
regular series of conferences, seminars, 
and workshops for education, business, 
and professional groups. It is a 
memorial to Thomas E. Millsop, former 
president and chairman of the National 
Steel Corporation. 

Gresham House (1972) is the Millsop 
Center's adjoining guest facility which 
provides 40 rooms for overnight 
accommodations for visitors to the 
College. It is named for Dr. Perry E. 
Gresham, Bethany's twelfth president, 
and his wife, Aleece. 

Harder Hall (1981) is the educational 
laboratory/dining facility for Millsop 
Center. It adjoins Gresham House, the 
forty room overnight guest facility. It 
honors Delmar C. Harder, a pioneer in 
automation in the American auto 
industry. 



Benedum Commons (1969) is the 
modern, air-conditioned dining facility 
for all Bethany students. In addition to 
the main dining room, the building 
houses a snack bar, lounge facilities and 
several small dining rooms for special 
student and faculty events. 



Bethany 



1. Pendleton Heights 

2. Old Main 

3. Commencement Hall 

4. Oglebay Hall 

5. Steinman Fine Arts Center 
Wailes Theater 

6. Irvin Gymnasium 

7. Richardson Hall of Science 
Weimer Lecture Hall 

8. Phillips Memorial Library 

9. Morlan Hall 

10. Harlan Hall 

11. Phillips Hall 
Rentier Too 
Maxwell's 

12. Cramblet Hall 

13. Cochran Hall 

14. Benedum Commons 

15. Bethany House-Renner Union 
Bookstore 
Admission Office 

16. Infirmary 

17. McEachern Hall 

18. McLean Hall 

19. Bethany Memorial Church 

20. Campbell Hall 

21. Buildings & Grounds 

22. Heating Plant 

23. Knight Natatorium 

24. Alumni Field House 

25. Rine Field 

26. Gresham House 

27. Leadership Center 

28. Highland Hearth 

29. Faculty Apartments 

30. Clark House (ata) 

31. Hagerman House |*kt] 

32. McDiarmid House 

33. Goodnight House (sap:] 

34. Woolery House 

35. Zeta Tau Alpha 

36. Sigma Alpha Epsilon 

37. Alpha Xi Delta 

38. Independent House 

39. Kappa Delta 

40. Phi Mu 

41. Weimer Nature Trail 

42. Amphitheater 

43. Oglebay Gates 

44. Harder Hall 




8 



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Residence Halls 

Harlan, Morlan, Phillips, and Campbell 
are the largest residence halls on the 
Bethany campus. Since 1966, Bethany 
has moved toward small, self-governing 
living units, each accommodating either 
32 or 48 students and containing social 
and recreational facilities. Phillips Hall, 
one of two freshmen women residences 
and the oldest residence hall (1890) on 
campus, was remodeled in early 1978. 
The ground floor now houses a large, 
multipurpose recreation room, Renner 
Too, Maxwell's Coffee House and 
kitchen facilities. In addition, all 
students' rooms have been redecorated 
and the heating system, fire safety and 
access for the handicapped have been 
improved. 

In the early 1970's, six 32-bed residence 
units were constructed on the wooded 
north slope of the campus. These units 
house fraternities, sororities, and 
independent men. 



Phillips Memorial 
Library 

The T. W. Phillips Memorial Library, 
built in 1959, is a gift of the Phillips 
family of Butler, Pa., as a memorial to 
T. W. Phillips, Sr. and T. W. Phillips, Jr., 
leading laymen of the Christian Church, 
trustees of the college, and generous 
philanthropists. 

Open 92 hours a week, the staff of 
librarians and clerks, assisted by more 
than 35 student assistants, is eager to 
help students and faculty find the 
information they need in the library's 
quality collections. 

The building contains nearly 144,000 
volumes of books and bound periodicals 
with additional collections of 
microforms, pamphlet files, selected 
government documents, and circulating 
art prints. The library's periodical 
holdings number 698, of which 587 are 
currently received. Local, area, 
national, and foreign newspapers arrive 
daily. 

The librarians and faculty select 
materials which provide students with 
the information needed to complete 
course assignments in the subject areas 
taught. Many alumni and friends of the 
College have given book collections 
and provided financial support 
which continues to enhance the quality 
of the holdings. 

For advanced research and senior 
projects, the Library, through its 
membership in the Pittsburgh Regional 
Library Center and the OCLC 
nationwide computerized network, 
provides Bethany students and faculty 
with interlibrary loan access to the 
collections of more than 1,800 college, 
university, public, and special libraries. 
Computerized searching of more than 
150 different periodical indexes, 
abstracts and information services is 
available through DIALOG'S 
Information Retrieval Service. The 
library provides weekend van service to 
libraries in Pittsburgh. 



The Campbell Room contains books, 
periodicals, letters, paintings, 
photographs, and museum pieces 
related to Bethany's founder and first 
president, Alexander Campbell, his 
Bethany associates, and his family. The 
College archives collection spans the 
history of the institution from its 
beginnings to yesterday's events. Both 
collections are significant resources not 
only for the history of the College and 
religious movement that Campbell 
began here but also for regional and 
intellectual history of the nineteenth 
century. 

Media Center 

The Media Center, located in the 
library, provides such instructional 
media materials as slides, audio and 
video tapes, cassettes, video discs, 
films, filmstrips, and recordings. A full 
array of the latest media equipment is 
available for students and faculty to use 
these media materials or to create their 
own productions. 

A media laboratory in the center 
provides language learning consoles, 
calculators, cable and closed circuit 
television, stereo record players, and 
other self-instructional media learning 
modules. 

Faculty or students can check out 
media materials or equipment for 
instructional use. The center also has 
production facilities for slides, tapes, 
filmstrips, transparencies, dry 
mounting, laminating, and high speed 
tape duplication. 

Close coordination between the media 
center and other media-oriented units 
on campus, such as WVBC radio, TV-3 
television, biology auto-tutorial 
laboratory, and campus duplicating 
services, make it possible to meet any 
media need of the Bethany College 
community. 



10 



Center for 

Academic 

Computing 

The Center for Academic Computing 
supports and encourages student and 
faculty use of computers in all 
disciplines. The Center offers a wide 
variety of services from computer- 
assisted instruction (CAI) and word 
processing to consulting services and 
classroom computer demonstrations. 

Monitored by student assistants, the 
computer center is open seven days 
(approximately 100 hours) weekly. 

The Center uses a PRIME 550 
computer which can be accessed from 
sixteen interactive workstations, 
including two printing terminals and a 
graphics terminal with copier. The 
facility supports text editing, system 
software packages, an educational 
software library and the programming 
languages, FORTRAN, Pascal, 
COBOL, PL/1, BASIC, RPG and 
Assembler. 

A separate microcomputing facility 
offers microcomputer training with 
particular application to graphics and 
automated instrumentation data 
collection. 





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College Life 



At Bethany, education is a total 
experience of living and learning. The 
College community offers a myriad of 
activities from hang gliding to campus 
theatre productions. Students are 
encouraged to participate in those 
things that will best compliment their 
educational experience. 

Bethany assumes the mature and 
responsible citizenship of its students. 
The College believes this citizenship is 
best realized through the personal 
freedom of each individual, as well as 
the community building efforts of 
students, faculty and administrators. 
College officials intervene only when 
the rights and privileges of some are 
threatened by the actions of others. 

Through this community interaction, 
there is such a sense of ownership by 
both those who learn and those who 
teach that the term "Bethanian" has 
come to mean a special sense of pride. 

Student Government 

The Student Board of Governors, with 
representatives from all residence 
groups, manages a substantial budget 
and appropriates funds for many 
diverse student activities. 
Representatives are appointed to many 
faculty committees including those 
concerned with curricula, cultural 
programs, schedules, athletics, religious 
life, international education, and the 
library. In addition, the Student Board 
of Governors President participates in 
the biannual Board of Trustees meeting 
as a non- voting member. 




Residence halls form the primary 
political groups for self-government. 
Fraternities, sororities, and house 
associations accommodate all 
upperclassmen in small self-governed 
units. These students are responsible 
for their conduct; cultural, academic, 
and social programming, and care of 
the facilities. Shortly after arrival, 
freshmen also organize and send 
representatives to student government. 

Student 
Regulations 

A complete description of the 
regulations pertaining to housing, 
telephones, dining rooms, health 
services, motor vehicles, use of alcoholic 
beverages and drugs, eligibility 
requirements, and other areas of 
student life is contained in the Student 
Handbook. However, applicants for 
admission should know the following in 
advance: 

1) With the exception of commuters 
(i.e., married students or students living 
with parents) all students are required 
to live in College residence halls or 
fraternity or sorority houses unless 
excused by the Dean of Students. 



2) All students, except commuters, are 
required to board in the College dining 
hall unless excused by the Dean of 
Students. No refunds are granted for 
meals missed. 

3) Freshmen are not permitted to bring 
automobiles to Bethany unless the 
request is approved by the Dean of 
Students and the vehicle properly 
registered. 

4) Violations of regulations which are 
not adequately dealt with by the self- 
governing housing unit may be referred 
to the Dean of Students or to the 
Student Court. The Student Court is 
composed entirely of students and 
offers students the opportunity to be 
judged by their peers. 

Residence Life 

The majority of Bethany residences are 
small, self-governed living units, 
including 11 home-like, 32-bed or 48-bed 
houses on the wooded slopes opposite 
the main campus. In all, 20 housing 
units are available to students. 

Fraternities, sororities, and 
independent-house associations 
constitute the primary upperclass social 
groups on campus. Each association or 
fraternal group is responsible for 
arranging its cultural, recreational, and 
social experiences and for maintaining 
its own internal discipline. Houses are 
also responsible for organizing day-to- 
day housekeeping chores and for 
working closely with the College in 
developing a decor that suits the group 
living style. 



13 



Freshmen live in the larger residence 
halls, but are granted many of the same 
freedoms and responsibilities of the 
upperclassmen. Head residents and 
student resident assistants give a great 
deal of leadership and counsel the first 
semester, and by the second semester 
freshmen are involved in most decision- 
making. 

The seven fraternities and four 
sororities at Bethany are nationally 
affiliated and constitute approximately 
60 percent of the student body. 
Interfraternity Council and Panhellenic 
Council, composed of representatives 
from each of the fraternities and 
sororities, act as the coordinating 
agencies in fraternal affairs and 
activities. 

The fraternities represented are Alpha 
Sigma Phi, Beta Theta Pi, Delta Tau 



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restoration of thii (tract™ 10 
it; original condition 




Delta, Kappa Alpha, Sigma Alpha 
Epsilon, Phi Kappa Tau, and Sigma Nu. 
The sororities are Alpha Xi Delta, 
Kappa Delta, Phi Mu, and Zeta Tau 
Alpha. 

Social Life 

Much of the social life at Bethany is 
casual. It may be a coffee date or 
Thursday Cabaret Night at the Barn or 
a mid-week sporting event. Any night 
of the week, friends can be found 
studying at the library or in a residence 
hall lounge. Athletics, theatre, movies, 
concerts, coffee-house programs and 
parties fill many weekends. 

The Student-run College Union 
Program Board brings numerous big- 
name concerts to campus. In recent 
years, the Lester Lanin Orchestra has 
played for Homecoming while other 
concerts were given by Livingston 
Taylor, North of Nashville, Michael 
Murphy, The Toons, Castleman's Run, 
Josh White Jr., The Helicon Ensemble, 
The Association, Gary U.S. Bonds, 
Gene Cotton and others. 

Some of the other entertainers to 
appear at Maxwell's Coffee House were 
Lee Smedley, Andy Cohen, Debbie 
McClatchey, Ernie Hawkins and 
Friends, George Williams, Lisa Null, 
Larry Edelman and the Deer Creek 
String Band, Kevin Roth, Toni Olshan, 
The Blue Ridge Serenaders, Archie 
Edwards, Saul Broudy, Bob Carlin, 
Woven Wire, Joe Mirenna and others. 

Also performing at Bethany for All- 
Campus Dances were American 
Express, The Flashcats, and Norman 
Nardini and the Tigers. 

Volunteers in 
Action 

Volunteers in Action (VIA) is a student- 
initiated and student-run organization 
providing various community services 
by Bethany College students. At the 
same time, VIA gives Bethanians the 
opportunity for practical experience in 
some of the helping professions. Not 



only is it a means of fulfilling practicum 
requirements, but VIA offers on and off 
campus activities to help others along 
with helping the students themselves 
develop group skills and a sense of 
personal satisfaction. 

The different volunteer programs work 
with a diversity of ages and resources. 
These include experience with playing 
and tutoring with rural children in the 
Saturday School programs, the "Kings 
Clowns," a Clown Ministry Troupe, and 
working with children at St. John's 
Home for Children. Other programs 
involve helping with the elderly of the 
Bethany community, visiting and 
working in a rehabilitation and 
extended-care hospital, and visiting 
with individuals at a nearby mental 
health center. 

As the largest student organization on 
campus, Volunteers in Action hopes to 
generate concern and compassion 
throughout the community while 
enhancing practical learning 
experience. 

Cultural Activities 

Speakers on campus within the past 
two years were Colonel William J. 
Taylor, Richard Horrow, Judy 
Woodruff, Rob Inglis, Lord of the 
Rings, one-man show; Colonel Leland 
Holland, former Iranian hostage, 
President Gerald R. Ford, and CLEW 
speaker Peggy Owen Clark. 

Cultural events included Repertory 
Dance Theatre Residency, The Tommy 
Dorsey Orchestra, Annapolis Brass, 



14 



Mitchell Korn, Reader's Digest Affiliate 
Artist, The Appalachian String 
Quartet, and the Woodlands Brass 
Ensemble. 

Numerous art and photographic shows, 
including the Bethany Fall and Spring 
Art Exhibitions, were displayed in 
Renner Union Lounge. Student and 
faculty shows were exhibited 
throughout the year. 



Music 



Theatre 



Drama is one of the most important co- 
curricular activities at Bethany. Nearly 
one-fourth of the last senior class 
participated in a production while at 
Bethany. Often acting, directing, 
playwriting, and producing are 
correlated with courses in the theatre 
department. Non-theatre majors have 
every opportunity to participate. 

Most of the productions are staged in 
Wailes Theatre of the Steinman Fine 
Arts Center. The theatre seats 300 
people and has a fully equipped 
workshop. Most plays are performed 
three or four times. 

Last year's productions included "The 
Indian Wants the Bronx," "Killer's 
Head," "The Shadow Box," "Measure 
for Measure," "The Butterfingers 
Angel, Mary and Joseph, Herod the 
Nut, and the Slaughter of Twelve Hit 
Carols in a Pear Tree," "A Life in the 
Theatre," Student-Directed One-Act 
plays, "The Women," and "Lady in the 
Dark." 



There is a wide range of musical groups 
on campus in both the vocal and 
instrumental fields. 

The Concert Choir performs on campus 
and goes on tour each spring. The 
repertoire consists primarily of serious 
sacred and secular works of many 
periods. There is opportunity within the 
choir itself for the formation of smaller 
ensembles to cultivate special types of 
repertoire. 

The Madrigal Ensemble and Glee Club 
are select groups which sing a variety 
of types of works. These groups, and 
others in the community, form the 
Oratorio Chorus which annually 
presents a major concert during the 
Christmas season. 

The College Band performs at athletic 
contests and for special occasions 
throughout the year. Band members 
attend an instrumental seminar each 
fall before the opening of school. 

The Jazz Band, a select group of 
players, performs the big band 
repertoire. This group annually tours 
various high schools in West Virginia, 
Ohio and Pennsylvania. 

The Brass Choir appears at formal 
convocations and in concerts. It is open 
to qualified players by audition as 
vacancies occur. 

Chamber Music is provided by 
woodwind quintets, string quartets, and 
smaller ensembles that develop 
annually and are open to all who play 
orchestral instruments. 

There is opportunity for proficient 
orchestral musicians, especially string 
players, to play in the Wheeling 
Symphony. To be admitted into this 
orchestra one must audition with the 
Symphony's director. 




Campus Media 

Student-produced publications include a 
campus newspaper, The. Tower; a 
yearbook, The Bethanian; a literary 
journal, The Harbinger; and a 
magazine, The Folio. There is also a 
campus radio station, WVBC-FM, and a 
campus television station, TV3. All 
media are managed and staffed by 
students with close supervision from a 
faculty advisor. 

All of these media are under the 
supervision of the Board of 
Communications which is chaired by the 
president of the Student Board of 
Governors. The board includes the 
student editors and business managers 
of all publications, the general manager 
and program director of the radio and 
television stations, and members of the 
faculty and administration. 



15 



Intercollegiate 
Athletics, 
Intramurals, and 
Recreation 

Bethany College is a member of 
Division III of the National Collegiate 
Athletic Association and the 
Association for Intercollegiate Athletics 
for Women. Men's intercollegiate sports 
include baseball, basketball, cross 
country, football, golf, lacrosse, soccer, 
swimming, tennis, and track. Bethany's 
men's teams compete in the Presidents' 
Athletic Conference which also includes 
the following colleges and universities: 
Allegheny, Carnegie-Mellon, Thiel, and 
Washington & Jefferson in western 
Pennsylvania; and Case-Western 
Reserve, Hiram, and John Carroll in 
Ohio. The women's athletic teams 
compete in the Pennwood West 
Conference in the following sports: 
basketball, field hockey, lacrosse, 
Softball, tennis, and volleyball. 
Membership in the section of the 
Pennwood West Conference in which 
Bethany participates includes: 
Carnegie-Mellon, Chatham, Carlow, 
Seton Hill, St. Francis, and Washington 
& Jefferson. 




16 






Recreation is provided for the entire 
student body through an extensive 
intramural and open recreation 
program. Men's intramural sports 
include basketball, bowling, cross 
country, football, golf, racketball, 
softball, swimming, table tennis, tennis, 
track, volleyball, and wrestling. 
Women's intramural sports include 
bowling, basketball, cross country, 
softball, table tennis, football, 
swimming, tennis, track, and volleyball. 
The director of intramural athletics 
supervises the program. 

Bethany encourages students to 
develop skills in recreational activities 
that may be continued through life. In 
addition to the usual team sports, staff 
instruction is available in archery, 
badminton, horseback riding, 
swimming, golf, tennis, camping 
techniques, jogging, body mechanics, 
bowling, dancing, gymnastics, and 
aerobics. 

There are many opportunities available 
for students who wish to pursue 
recreational interests. The 1,600 acres 
of College land provide a natural 
setting for hiking and nature study. The 
Wilderness Club provides for camping, 
backpacking, and rafting. Ski slopes 



and riding stables are available at 
nearby Oglebay Park. The Dutch Fork 
Hunt Club invites students to go fox 
hunting from September through 
February. Local farmers are willing to 
board horses. Three public, 18-hole golf 
courses, including one of Robert Trent 
Jones design, are located within 10 
miles of campus. 

Student Health 
Services 

All students entering Bethany for the 
first time are required to submit a 
completed physical examination form 
before registration. After arrival, the 
College health service is maintained by 
student fees, and all students are 
entitled to infirmary privileges as in- 
patients and out-patients. A minimum 
charge for prescription medicines, 
ointments, or injections may be added 
to the student's account in the Business 
Office. 



The Bethany infirmary is on 24-hour 
call for illnesses and injuries which 
occur during the academic year. Medical 
service is not available at the infirmary 
during vacations and recess periods. 
Students who suffer serious illnesses 
and accidents are usually treated at the 
Wheeling Hospital, located 15 miles 
from the town of Bethany which 
maintains ambulance service for 
emergencies. 

The College physicians have regular 
office hours each weekday morning 
during the school year for free 
consultation. In case of an emergency 
operation, when the parents cannot be 
reached, the Dean of Students, upon 
the recommendation of the College 
physician, assumes the responsibility of 
giving permission for operations. 

Bethany provides medical, surgical, and 
hospitalization insurance. All students 
are automatically included in the 
coverage from September 1 to August 
31 and are charged accordingly unless 
the appropriate waiver is forwarded to 
the Business Office. Expenses for 
outside consultation and treatment are 
the responsibility of the student in all 
cases when not covered by insurance. 




Religious Life 

A variety of religious backgrounds is 
represented in the student body and 
faculty. While participation in religious 
activities is entirely voluntary, there are 
substantial opportunities for religious 
exploration and participation on 
campus. 

Many students find in Bethany 
Memorial Church an opportunity for 
expression of their religious faith. The 
minister of this church, who is also the 
College chaplain, is available to 
students for counseling and advice on 
personal and religious matters. 

The Bishop of Wheeling-Charleston 
Diocese of the Roman Catholic Church 
provides a chaplain and chapel for 
Catholic students. He is available daily 
for counseling, in addition to the 
celebration of Mass each Sunday and on 
Holy days. 

The Jewish fellowship meets for 
worship and study. Jewish 
congregations in Steubenville and 
Wheeling sponsor the fellowship and 
entertain Jewish students for the high 
holidays. 

Career and 

Professional 

Development 

The Office of Career & Professional 
Development assists students and 
alumni in developing life skills, planning 
careers, and obtaining both temporary 
and permanent jobs. Personal and 
career counseling is provided, and 
workshops are presented on such topics 
as resume writing, interviewing, job 
hunting, values, skills identification, 
conflict resolution, and time 
management. The Office coordinates 
and schedules campus employment and 
corporate recruiting. It also maintains a 
Career Resource Center consisting of 
career planning literature, job 
announcements, a volunteer contact 
network of alumni and friends of the 
College, material on internships, and 
graduate and professional school 



information. Free credential service is 
available to all Seniors and alumni who 
register with the Office. 

Advising and 
Counseling 

Bethany recognizes the need to provide 
its entering students with an 
introduction to their work in new 
surroundings and therefore requires 
freshmen to come to the campus several 
days before the formal registration of 
other students. The orientation period 
is planned not only to introduce the 
students to the College but also to 
introduce the College to the students. 

From the beginning of their collegiate 
career, students are assigned a faculty 
advisor. Through the Bethany Plan 
curriculum, freshmen advisors come 
into weekly seminar contact with their 
advisees. Thus, they have ample 
opportunity to observe student 
strengths and weaknesses in academic 
situations as well as in more relaxed 
and informal counseling situations. 

After students choose a major field of 
concentration, they are then assigned to 
a faculty advisor in their chosen 
department. This advisor helps the 
student plan an academic program 
consistent with the aims and 
requirements of the department in a 
liberal arts education, and a program 
which is in keeping with the student's 
abilities and aspirations. 

The chief officer in charge of student 
advising and counseling, student 
welfare, and coordination of all student 
personnel administration is the Dean of 
Students. Members of his staff are 
available for help in all major areas of 
guidance, including post graduate and 
career planning. 



17 



Advisors 

For Freshmen 

Lynn Adkins 
William B. Allen 
Leonora Balla Cayard 
J. Daniel Draper 
Paul E. Diss Jr. 
Lewis F. Gaetano 
Larry E. Grimes 



David M. Hutter 
David J. Judy 
Marc A. Olshan 
J. Trevor Peirce 
Paul C. Smith 
Jay Start 
T. Gale Thompson 



For Fields of Concentration 

Art 

Biology 

Chemistry 

Communications 

Computer Science 



Walter L. Kornowski 
Albert R. Buckelew Jr. 
J. Daniel Draper 
Harold C. Shaver 
James E.Allison 
Economics and Business William C. Pavord 
Education Ann C. Shelly 

English Larry E. Grimes 

Fine Arts John R. Taylor 

Foreign Languages Leonora Balla Cayard 
Health Science Gary E . Larson 

History and Political 

Science William L. Young 

Interdisciplinary Studies Larry E. Grimes 
Mathematics James E . Allison 

Music William P. Crosbie 

Philosophy Robert E. Myers 

Physical Education David M. Hutter 

Physics Edwin Goldin 

Psychology J. Trevor Peirce 

Religious Studies Richard B. Kenney 

Sociology and Social Work Lynn Adkins 
Theatre David J. Judy 




18 



For Career Interests 

Advertising James W. Carty Jr. 

Harold C. Shaver 
Dentistry J. Daniel Draper 

Drama David J. Judy 

Engineering Edwin Goldin 

Law William L. Young 

Medicine J. Daniel Draper, Gary E. Larson 
Ministry Richard B. Kenney 

Newspaper James W. Carty Jr. 

Albert C. Skaggs 
Public Relations James W. Carty Jr. 

Harold C. Shaver 
Radio James J. Humes 

Recreation Leadership David M. Hutter 

Social Work Lynn Adkins 

Teaching Ann C. Shelly 

Television Harold C. Shaver 

Veterinary Medicine Gary E.Larson 

For Special Services 

Campus Employment John Cunningham 
Counseling Zoila Airall 

Foreign Students Gary E. Larson, 

John Cunningham 
Graduate Fellowships 

and Scholarships Robert E . Myers 

Ministerial Training 

Awards Robert A. Sandercox 

Social Security and 

Veterans Benefits Joseph M. Kurey 

Social and 

Recreational 

Activities Darline B.Nicholson 

Testing Zoila Airall 

Undergraduate Scholarships 

Theodore W. Bunnell, Beth Dameier 
Vocational Information 

i/i_ 'j Tk u r> tt ] 



Pre-Professional 
Study 

Professional Core 
Program 

In order to assist students toward 
professional careers, Bethany offers 
four "Professional Core Programs" 
in Management, Public Affairs (Public 
Policy /Administration), Communication 
(Marketing or Electronic Media), and 
Science and Technology (Computing or 
Pre-professional Science). 

These distinctive curricular options are 
generally interdisciplinary and are 
chosen as electives, supplementing the 
student's major field of concentration. 
For instance, a student majoring in Art 
or Music may elect to complete a core in 
Management, or a Biology or 
Chemistry major may choose a core in 
Communication with an Electronic 
Media emphasis. The aim of the 
program, then, is to broaden the 
student's career options as well as to 
extend the academic experience of the 
student. The program may also be 
viewed as preparation for graduate or 
professional school in an area outside 
the student's regular field of 
concentration. 

Fulfillment of the requirements for a 
core will be noted on the student's 
transcript. Specific details of these 
requirements may be secured in the 
Office of Career and Professional 
Development. Students interested in 
pursuing a Professional Core Program 
should see their faculty advisors at an 
early point in their course planning. 

Core Advisors 

Communication 
Management 
Public Affairs 
Science and Technology 



James W. Carty Jr. 

William C. Pavord 

Albert J. Ossman 

Milton R. Smith Jr. 



Pre-Medical and 
Health Professions 

Students desiring to prepare for the 
study of medicine, dentistry, or any of 
the health related fields will find 
instruction and facilities at Bethany 
which satisfy the entrance requirements 
for the best professional schools.. 

The Medical College Admissions Test or 
the Dental Admissions Test, covering 
medical or dental school entrance 
requirements in chemistry, biology, and 
physics as well as the social sciences 
and humanities, must be taken in the 
junior year. A program furnishing the 
proper sequence of courses to prepare 
students to take either of these tests 
requires that both beginning chemistry 
and biology be taken in the first 
semester of the freshman year. 

Bethany also provides a degree 
program for certified allied health 
professionals who have completed 
accredited technical programs at other 
institutions. For details of this Health 
Science degree, see page 88. 

The Career Advisement Committee of 
the faculty disseminates information on 
the professional programs and entrance 
requirements in the various health 
related areas as well as writes letters of 
reference and helps students gain some 
experience in the matters of interviews. 

Pre-Law 

Most law schools do not require specific 
undergraduate courses for entrance. 
Rather they expect the broadest 
possible educational background. They 
do, however, recommend that the 
prospective law student acquire skills in 
three basic areas: 1) effectiveness in the 
comprehension and expression of the 
English language, 2) insight into the 
understanding of human institutions 



and values, 3) creative power in 
thinking. Courses in English 
composition and literature, history, 
ethics, logic, economics, political 
science, sociology, and accounting are 
particularly useful in acquiring these 
skills. 

Pre-E ngineering 

Training in the sciences and humanities 
provides a good foundation for pre- 
engineering students, some of whom 
desire to transfer to an engineering 
school after carefully following the 
requirements of the engineering school 
they wish to enter. 

By cooperative arrangement with 
Case Western Reserve University, 
Columbia University, Georgia Institute 
of Technology, and Washington 
University, Bethany offers the first 
three years of a five-year course and 
arranges for the qualified student to 
transfer to one of these engineering 
schools for the last two years of 
undergraduate training. Upon 
completion of the five-year program, 
degrees from both institutions are 
granted. For more information about 
these programs, see page 44. 

Professional Chemistry 

A thorough preparation for professional 
chemistry and a background in the 
liberal arts at Bethany conforms to 
American Chemical Society standards. 
Independent study introduces the 
student to the principles of research 
which aids in any contemplated 
graduate or industrial work following 
graduation. 

Business Administration 

Preparation for entry into schools of 
business and careers in business and 
industry is provided both 
departmentally and 
interdepartmentally. The traditional 
field of concentration in Economics and 
Business is the typical approach, but 
many students elect to concentrate in 
Mathematics, with its "track" in 
Economics, or in Communications, with 
an emphasis in advertising and public 
relations. In addition, some choose 
other fields as their major area and 



carefully select their electives among 
business-related courses. Graduate 
schools of business generally expect 
students to have a background in basic 
economic theory, the principles of 
accounting, and mathematics. 

Pre-Theological 

Students who plan to enter church 
vocations are expected to complete 
their preparation in seminaries and 
graduate schools of religion after 
graduating from Bethany. Their 
undergraduate studies, therefore, are 
primarily liberal arts. Students elect 
courses which provide necessary 
pre-seminary studies in the natural and 
social sciences, the arts and humanities, 
and religion. 

Social Work Education 

Students may qualify for entry-level 
positions in the social work profession 
by completing an undergraduate major 
in Bethany's social work program. The 
liberal arts emphasis of The Bethany 
Plan provides a rich setting for career 
preparation in this essentially humane 
profession. The undergraduate social 
work program is also solid preparation 
for graduate work in the field. 
Although it is desirable to enter the 
program as early as possible, course 
requirements can be met during the 
student's junior and senior years. For 
further information, see the head of the 
Sociology and Social Work Department. 

Teacher Education 

The preparation of teachers for the 
secondary and elementary schools is 
one of the major professional 
preparation programs at the college. 
Requirements for certification may be 
found in the course listings for the 
individual academic departments. 
Students wishing to prepare for a 
career in teaching should contact the 
head of the Education Department for 
further information in the freshman 
year or as soon as the decision is made. 



19 



Achievement 
Recognition 

Bethany encourages achievement in 
scholarship and leadership in student 
affairs by public recognition at 
Commencement, Honors Day, 
Founder's Day, and on other suitable 
occasions. 

Graduation Honors 

Students who have done academic work 
of unusual merit are graduated with 
honors: Summa Cum Laude (3.85), 
Magna Cum Laude (3.65), or Cum 
Laude (3.35). The awarding of honors is 
determined upon the basis of total 
quality points earned, standing in the 
Senior Comprehensive Examination, 
and the recommendation of the 
student's advisor. 

Students who do unusually well on the 
Senior Comprehensive Examination are 
listed at graduation as having "passed 
with distinction." 

Dean's List 

At the end of each semester, students 
who have rated high academically 
(grade point average of 3.65 or better) 
are designated as "Students 
Distinguished in Scholarship." Often 
called the Dean's List, this distinction is 
determined by the Honors Committee. 

Senior Fellowships 

Certain members of the junior class 
may be designated as senior fellows for 
the following year. The selection is 
made from students who have 
demonstrated unusual excellence in 
their field of concentration and who, by 
character and ability, can do special 
work in a department or area as an 
assistant in instruction or research. 



Usually no more than 12 full-year senior 
fellowships and one senior fellowship 
at-large (or the equivalents) are 
awarded in any one year. Usually no 
more than one full-year appointment (or 
the equivalent) will be made in any one 
department or area. Although the title 
of senior-fellow-at-large is provided 
primarily for capable students involved 
in interdisciplinary programs, students 
in other fields of concentration may be 
nominated for this category. 

The selection of senior fellows is made 
by the Honors Committee from 
nominations usually presented by 
department heads. 

Honor Societies 

A number of honor societies have been 
established at Bethany through the 
years to recognize academic 
achievement and campus leadership. 

Gamma Sigma Kappa is a scholastic 
society founded at Bethany in 1932. 
Students who have achieved a 
cumulative scholarship index of at least 
3.70 (over at least four consecutive 
semesters and provided that in no 
semester their scholastic index falls 
below a 3.00) may, upon 
recommendation of the Honors 
Committee, be considered for 
membership. Usually, however, not 
more than 10 per cent of any class will 
be recommended. 

Bethany Kalon is a junior and senior 
society established in 1948 to give 
recognition to students of high 
character who have demonstrated 
competent and unselfish leadership in 
student activities and have been 
constructive citizens of the college 
community. Selection is made by the 
members of the society with the advice 
and approval of the Honors Committee. 

Alpha Phi Chapter of Beta Beta Beta 

is for students of the biological sciences. 
Its purpose is to stimulate sound 
scholarship, to promote the 
dissemination of scientific truth, and to 
encourage investigation into the life 
sciences. 



Gamma Upsilon Chapter of Lambda 
Iota Tau. Lambda Iota Tau is an 
international honor society for the 
encouragement and reward of 
scholastic excellence in the study of 
literature. Membership is limited to 
juniors and seniors who have a 
cumulative scholarship index of 3.0, 
who have completed a minimum of 12 
semester hours of literature courses 
with at least a 3.0 grade-point average 
in them and in all prerequisite courses, 
and who have presented a scholarly, 
critical, or creative paper which has 
been accepted by the chapter. The 
Chapter presents an annual award for 
the best senior project in literature. 
Lambda Iota Tau is a member of the 
Association of College Honor Societies. 

Alpha Chapter of Omicron Delta 
Epsilon, an international honor society 
in economics, was established in 1960 to 
recognize excellence in the study of 
economics. Membership is limited to 
students who have completed a 
minimum of 16 semester hours of 
economics, including either Economics 
301 or 302, and who have achieved both 
a departmental and overall grade-point 
average of 3.25 or better. 

Beta Gamma Chapter of Alpha Psi 
Omega. Alpha Psi Omega is a national 
recognition society in dramatics. 
Students qualify by faithful work in 
playing major and minor roles or 
working with technical or business 
aspects of theatre. 

Mu Epsilon Chapter of Phi Alpha 
Theta was established at Bethany in 
1967 to recognize excellence in the 
study of history. Its membership is 
limited to those students who have 
completed at least 12 hours of history 
with a grade-point average of 3.0 or 
better and with at least a 3.0 grade- 
point average in two-thirds of all other 
studies. Members must also rank in the 
upper 35 per cent of their class. 



20 



Bethany Chapter of the Society for 
Collegiate Journalists, a national 
recognition society in journalism, is 
designed to stimulate interest in 
journalism, foster the mutual welfare of 
student publications, and reward 
journalists for their efforts, service, and 
accomplishments. 

Kappa XI Chapter of Sigma Delta Pi 

is an honor society for those who attain 
excellence in the study of the Spanish 
language and the literature and culture 
of the Spanish peoples. Students who 
are at least second semester 
sophomores and have a high scholastic 
index and who have completed at least 
one advanced course in Spanish 
literature are eligible for membership. 

Epsilon Chi Chapter of Kappa Pi is for 

students of graphic arts. Its purpose is 
to uphold the highest ideals of a liberal 
education, to provide a means whereby 
students with artistic commitment meet 
for the purpose of informal study and 
entertainment, to raise the standards of 
productive artistic work, and to furnish 
the highest reward for conscientious 
effort in furthering the best interest in 
art in the broadest sense of the term. 

Alpha Chapter of Kappa Mu Epsilon, 

a national honor society in 
mathematics, was established in 1975 to 
recognize outstanding achievement in 
mathematics. Its membership is limited 
to those students who have completed 
at least three semesters at Bethany, 
rank in the upper 35 per cent of their 
class, have completed at least three 
mathematics courses, including one 
semester of calculus, and have a grade- 
point average of 3.0 or better in all 
mathematics courses. 



Kappa Tau Lambda music honorary 
promotes greater participation and 
appreciation of music by encouraging 
attendance at recitals, sponsoring field 
trips to concerts and providing an 
opportunity for students of music to 
meet and exchange ideas. The honorary 
also encourages greater participation in 
College musical groups and solo recitals 
while upholding high standards of 
musical performance. Qualifications for 
membership include at least a 
3.0 average in eight or more hours of 
music. 

Phi Delta Psi is a physical education 
honorary for both men and women 
which encourages scholarship, 
leadership, fellowship, high educational 
standards and participation in 
departmental activities. To be eligible, 
students must be at the second 
semester level of the sophomore year 
and achieve a grade point average of at 
least 3.0. 



Awards 



Oreon E. Scott Award is presented to 
the graduating senior who has achieved 
the highest academic record over a 
four-year period of study. The donor of 
this award was a long-time Bethany 
trustee and a graduate of the class of 
1892. 

Anna Ruth Bourne Award stimulates 
scholarship among the women's social 
groups. A silver cup, provided by an 
anonymous donor in honor of the 
former distinguished head of the 
English department, is awarded to the 
recognized women's group whose active 
membership earns the highest 
scholarship standing each semester. The 
group winning the cup for four 
semesters is presented with a smaller 
replica as a permanent trophy. 

W. Kirk Woolery Award encourages 
scholarship among the men's social 
groups. A silver cup, donated by friends 
of the late Dr. Woolery, a former Dean 
and Provost of the College, is held by 
the recognized men's social group or 
housing organization whose 



membership (active membership only in 
the case of fraternities) earns the 
highest scholarship standing each 
semester. Any group winning the cup 
for four semesters is presented with a 
smaller replica as a permanent trophy. 

The Beta Beta Beta - B. R. Weimer 
Award, established in honor of the late 
Bernal R. Weimer, Professor of Biology 
and Dean of the Faculty, is given each 
year to the senior in biology who has 
attained the highest academic rank in 
this field of concentration. 

The Beta Beta Beta Prize is awarded 
the student who has received the 
highest grades in the initial courses in 
biology. 

Florence Hoagland Memorial Award, 

given by a graduate of the class of 1944, 
is presented to the outstanding senior 
English major. The award honors the 
memory of the late Miss Hoagland who 
was for many years Professor of 
English at Bethany. 

Christine Burleson Memorial Award, 

given by a graduate of the class of 1936, 
is presented to a senior English major 
who has attained excellence in this field 
of concentration. The award honors the 
memory of the late Miss Burleson who 
was Professor of English and Dean of 
Women from 1932 to 1936. 

Cammie Pendleton Awards, named in 
honor of Miss A. Campbellina 
Pendleton, Professor of Language and 
Literature at Bethany from 1884 to 
1909, are presented to the outstanding 
junior and sophomore concentrating in 
English. The awards are given by 
D wight B. MacCormack, Jr., of the 
class of 1956, in memory of his 
grandmother, Dr. T Marion 
MacCormack. 



21 



E. E. Roberts Distinguished Prize in 
Campus Journalism is awarded to an 
outstanding student who excels in work 
with one of the student media, in 
academic work in the Department of 
Communications, or both. 

Winfred E. Garrison Prize is 

presented in recognition of outstanding 
achievement in one or more areas of 
philosophy. The award honors the 
memory of the late Dr. Winfred E. 
Garrison, graduate of the class of 1892, 
whose humane concerns and scholarly 
achievements contributed significantly 
to the area of higher education, history, 
and philosophy. 

Outstanding Junior Woman Award is 

provided by the Pittsburgh Bethany 
College Club, comprising the Bethany 
alumnae of Pittsburgh. This award is 
based on qualities of leadership, 
character, conduct, and scholarship. 
The club has placed a suitable plaque in 
Phillips Hall on which names of the 
winners are engraved. In addition, an 
individual gift is made to the recipient. 

Vira I. Heinz Award is granted to the 
junior woman who has distinguished 
herself by leadership, character, 
conduct, and scholarship and whose 
proposal for foreign travel most 
significantly supplements her 
educational objectives. This award for 
summer travel is provided by the fund 
of Vira I. Heinz, recipient of the 
honorary Doctor of Religious Education 
degree from Bethany in 1969. 

Benjamin Chandler Shaw Travel 
Award is granted to the junior man 
who has distinguished himself by 
leadership, character, conduct and 
scholarship and whose proposal for 
foreign travel most significantly 



supplements his educational objectives. 
This award is funded by an anonymous 
friend of the college in recognition of 
Dr. Shaw, Bethany's George T Oliver 
Distinguished Professor of History and 
Political Science Emeritus. Dr. Shaw 
joined the Bethany faculty in 1935, 
served from 1945 to 1966 as head of the 
Department of History and Political 
Science and continued part-time until 
1973. 

W. F. Kennedy Prize is given to the 
outstanding young man in the junior 
class. This award, established by W. F. 
Kennedy of Wheeling, West Virginia, is 
awarded on the basis of the student's 
contribution to the college community 
life through leadership in activities, in 
personal character, and scholarship. 

Pearl Mahaffey Prize is awarded to 
the outstanding senior major in 
Languages. The award was established 
by Mrs. Walter M. Haushalter and 
other former students of Bethany's 
emeritus professor of foreign 
languages. The prize honors Miss 
Mahaffey, a faculty member from 
1908-1949 and a trustee of the College 
at the time of her death in 1971. 

Shirley Morris Memorial Award was 

established by Theta Chapter of Zeta 
Tau Alpha in memory of Shirley Morris, 
a loyal member and past president of 
the chapter. It is given to an 
outstanding student in the field of 
modern languages. Selection is made by 
the Department of Foreign Languages. 

Margaret R. Woods Prize, sponsored 
by the Kappa Xi Chapter of Sigma 
Delta Pi, is awarded to the outstanding 
Spanish major. The prize honors Miss 
Woods who was a faculty member from 
1943 until her retirement in 1965. 
Selection is made by the Department of 
Foreign Languages. 

Auguste Comte Award is presented to 
the senior of the Sociology Department 
for outstanding scholarship and keen 
interest in the field. The award is 
named after the founding father of the 
discipline. 



Charles H. Manion Award is made to 
the outstanding senior art major. The 
award memorializes Charles H. Manion, 
long-time trustee of Bethany College 
who was associated with the steel 
industry in the Ohio Valley and who 
enjoyed painting. The prize is provided 
by his daughter, Mrs. Leonard Yurko, 
Weirton. 

Theodore R. Kimpton Prize is 

awarded to the outstanding senior 
French major. This prize, which is 
restricted to those students whose 
native language is other than French, 
was established by Theodore R. 
Kimpton, assistant professor of foreign 
languages at Bethany prior to his 
retirement from full-time teaching in 
1975. 

George K. Hauptfuehrer Award in 

Music is co-sponsored by the Music 
Society and Kappa Tau Lambda in 
honor of George K. Hauptfuehrer, 
Professor of Music and Head of the 
Department of Music Emeritus. The 
award is presented to the Bethany 
student who has demonstrated musical 
excellence and has participated actively 
in campus musical organizations. The 
award is open to both majors and non- 
majors, with preference given to 
upperclassmen. The recipient is selected 
by members of the student 
organizations in the Department of 
Music. 

J. S. V. Allen Memorial is a fund 
established by the family and friends of 
Professor Allen to provide for an 
annual award to the outstanding 
physics student. 

Frank Alfred Chapman Memorial is a 

fund established by Dr. Stanton 
Crawford to provide for an annual 
award to the outstanding history 
student. Preference is given to students 
of American history and the Ohio 
Valley. 



22 



Osborne Booth Prize is given to the 
student who excels in the field of 
religious studies and in the overall 
academic program. The late Osborne 
Booth was T. W. Phillips Professor of 
Old Testament when he retired in 1964 
after 35 years of teaching at Bethany. 

Francis 0. Carfer Prize is given to the 
senior who, in the judgment of the 
Honors Committee, has made the most 
outstanding contribution to the College. 
Mr. Carfer, a trustee of Bethany 
College for 29 years, was a graduate of 
the class of 1909. Recipients of the 
award must display sound academic 
accomplishments and characteristics of 
loyalty, service, and devotion to 
Bethany. 

W. H. Cramblet Prize recognizes 
outstanding achievement in 
mathematics. It is named in honor of 
Wilbur H. Cramblet, the eleventh 
president of Bethany College. 

John J. Knight Award is presented to 
the senior male Physical Education 
major displaying outstanding 
scholarship and athletic participation 
during his four years at Bethany. 

S. Elizabeth Reed Award is presented 
to the senior woman showing 
outstanding scholarship and athletic 
participation during her four years at 
Bethany. 

Frank Roy Gay Award, established in 
1982, is given to the senior 
interdisciplinary major who maintains a 
grade point average of 3.5 or above and 
displays outstanding leadership 
qualities in the Bethany community. 
The award is named for the former 
Professor of Classics at Bethany who 
taught English literature, religion and 
philosophy. 

A. Kenneth Stevenson Theatre Award 

is presented each year to the 
outstanding Bethany junior or senior of 
any discipline with a grade point 



average above 3.2 who has contributed 
the most significantly to Bethany 
College Theatre activity. The award 
also provides for guest artists to 
enhance the program in Theatre. 
A. Kenneth Stevenson of Washington, 
Pa., was a long-time supporter of the 
Bethany College Theatre program until 
his death in 1979. Mrs. A. Kenneth 
Stevenson, her sons, Drew and Mark, 
both graduates of Bethany, and 
members of the Department of Theatre 
make the yearly selections. 

Forrest H. Kirkpatrick Award is 

presented annually to the outstanding 
senior concentrating in economics and 
business. The award is named in honor 
of Dr. Kirkpatrick, long-time dean of 
the College who is currently serving as 
adjunct professor of economics. 

The Rush Carter Prize in music is 
presented to a member of the senior 
class in recognition of outstanding 
achievement in music. The prize honors 
the memory of the late Professor 
Carter who was a member of the 
Bethany faculty from 1934 to 1945. 

The Edna W. Woolery Bibliography 
Prize is awarded to a senior student 
and to a freshman student who have 
individually compiled a bibliography and 
who request that it be considered for 
receiving the award. Edna W. Woolery 
was a Librarian at Bethany during the 
1950s. In the event that the Award, 
established in 1981, is not granted in 
any year, the funds are used to 
purchase Library books. Additional 
information is available from the 
Librarian. 

Wall Street Journal Award is given to 
the student majoring in Economics who 
has the highest average in select 
department courses and has shown 
strong participation in departmental 
activities. 

Senior Chemistry Award is granted to 
the senior concentrating in chemistry 
who has achieved the highest 
cumulative average in the Department, 
including the record made on the Senior 
Comprehensive Examination. 



The Thomas R. Briggs Award is 

presented annually to the senior in 
psychology who has maintained the 
highest academic average in the 
department. The award is a memorial 
to the late Thomas R. Briggs, Class of 
1978, recipient of the Psychology 
Society Award in 1978. 

Society for Collegiate Journalists 
Award of Merit is presented to an 
upperclass writer or editor for 
significant contributions to campus 
student publications. 

WVBC-FM Senior Award is given to 
the senior who for four years has lent 
qualities of dedication, loyalty, 
leadership, talent, and creativity to 
WVBC's operations. 

WVBC-FM Talent Award is presented 
to the member of the WVBC staff who 
has offered the most outstanding 
continuous radio programming during 
the year. 

Freshman Writing Prizes, provided by 
alumni and awarded by the Department 
of English, are given annually to 
authors of the best essays written in 
Freshman Seminars. Each seminar 
leader submits the two best essays from 
the group and the winning essays 
are determined by a panel of judges. 

Research Awards 

The Gans Fund Awards are presented 
to juniors, seniors and graduates of the 
College who are engaged in approved 
study and research in some specific 
field of the sciences at Bethany College 
or elsewhere. The direct charge is "for 
the encouragement of research and 
discovery in the various fields of 
science." The awards were established 
by Wickliffe Campbell Gans of the Class 
of 1870 and Emmet W. Gans in memory 
of their father and mother, Daniel L. 
and Margaret Gordon Gans. 



23 



Admission 



Bethany accepts applications for 
admission from qualified candidates. 
Admission is based on a careful review 
of all credentials presented by the 
candidate. The Committee on 
Admission accepts candidates it 
considers best qualified among those 
applying. In no case does the meeting of 
minimum standards assure admission 
and acceptance is contingent upon a 
candidate's successful completion of 
secondary school. 

Bethany's admission policy enables the 
Committee on Admission to act on 
completed applications as they are 
received. Applicants will be notified of 
the Committee's decision approximately 
three weeks after all credentials have 
been received. Early application is 
advised. 

The College seeks students who have 
prepared themselves for a liberal arts 
curriculum by taking at least 15 units of 
college-preparatory work. Although the 
College does not prescribe how these 
units should be distributed, it expects a 
minimum of four years of English and 
the usual sequences in mathematics, 
science, foreign languages, and social 
studies. For students who have 
developed individual curricula or are 
involved in experimental honors 
programs, the Committee on Admission 
makes special evaluation. 




i 






$0KHa& 





The application process includes 
furnishing a transcript of completed 
work, a personal file, two references, 
and either the College Entrance 
Examination Board Scholastic Aptitude 
Test (SAT) scores or the American 
College Testing Program (ACT) scores. 
Supporting documents that might be of 
help in the process of admission, i.e., 
poetry, plays, short stories, music, 
artwork, photography, and journalistic 
writings, may also be submitted. 

Although not required, an on-campus 
interview with an admission officer is 
highly recommended. A campus visit 
will enable a student to develop some 
sensitivities about Bethany's lifestyle. A 
comprehensive tour, observation of 
classes, and interaction with Bethany 
students and faculty are available upon 
request. 



Prospective students are also invited to 
remain overnight as the guest of a 
Bethany student, Meals and overnight 
accommodations in college housing for 
prospective students are courtesy of the 
College. Lodging for parents is 
available at Gresham House, as well as 
nearby lodges, motels, and hotels. 
Transportation arrangements from the 
Greater Pittsburgh International 
Airport, as well as from the Pittsburgh 
rail and bus terminals, may be arranged 
through the Admission Office. 



25 



The Admission Office is open Monday 
through Friday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. 
and Saturday 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. 
throughout the year. Appointments 
may be made by calling 304-829-7611 or 
writing the Admission Office, Bethany 
College, Bethany, West Virginia 26032. 
Three days advance notice is requested 
to make proper arrangements. 



Transfers 



Transfer students are welcome. 
Procedures for transferring to Bethany 
are similar to those for freshmen. 
Any student in good standing at a fully 
accredited institution of higher 
education is eligible for acceptance. A 
majority of students accepted as 
transfers have above average grades 
and are seeking a campus life unlike 
that which they have experienced. 

Grades of "C" or better are accepted 
along with course work in which credit 
(on a credit/no credit basis) or pass (in a 
pass/fail system) has been received. If 
requested, course work from other 
institutions will be reviewed by 
Bethany's registrar prior to making 
application. 



Community/Junior 
College Graduates 

Students who have received or will 
receive an Associate in Arts or 
Associate in Science Degree and find 
Bethany's curriculum suited to their 
educational goals are encouraged to 
apply. 

Holders of the A.A./A.S. Degree who 
are accepted receive at least two years 
(minimum of 60 hours) credit, enter as 
juniors, and receive all the rights and 
privileges of upperclass students. 

Foreign Students 

Bethany is eager to review applications 
of students from other countries. 
Approximately 15 foreign countries are 
represented on campus each year. 

Students from non-English-speaking 
countries are required to submit, along 
with an application for admission, a 
complete secondary school transcript, 
the results of either the American 
College Testing Program (ACT) or the 
College Entrance Examination Board 
Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) and the 
Test of English as a Foreign Language 
(TOEFL), and at least two letters of 
recommendation. Applicants for the 
Fall Semester must submit the above 
stated materials by February 1. 

Foreign students are also requested to 
complete a Foreign Student's Financial 
Aid Application and Declaration. This 
form is to be returned with admission 
materials by the deadlines mentioned. 
Although Bethany is willing to review 
requests for financial assistance, funds 
are limited. 

Early Admission 

Some students complete their 
secondary school graduation 
requirements a year early and decide to 
pursue college admission after their 
junior year. For those who have 
demonstrated maturity and show 
evidence of a strong academic 



background, Bethany offers a program 
for early admission. For this type of 
admission, the usual admission 
procedures must be followed. A 
personal interview on campus as well as 
a discussion between the student's 
college counselor and a Bethany 
admission officer are required. 

Advanced 
Placement 

Students may receive advanced 
placement and/or credit from any 
department in the College through a 
testing program and must be 
accomplished before the end of the first 
year at Bethany College. Those who 
wish to receive credit by examination 
should consult with the coordinator of 
counseling services and the appropriate 
department head. 

Credit may be received or courses 
waived as a result of high scores on the 
College Entrance Examination Board 
Testing Program for Advanced 
Placement. The waiving of courses or 
granting of credit, however, are 
departmental matters and require 
consultation with the appropriate 
department head upon matriculation. 



27 



Expenses 
and 

Financial 
Aid 



Bethany College is a non-profit 
institution. Tuition, fees, and other 
general charges paid by the student 
cover less than three-fourths of the 
College's instructional and operational 
expenses. The remainder comes from 
income from endowment funds and 
from gifts and contributions. Bethany 
continues to keep the costs required 
from the student as low as possible. 

Comprehensive 
Charges 

Comprehensive charges of 
approximately $7,900 for a year at 
Bethany include the following: 

Tuition and Fees $5,630 

Room $755 

Board $1,240 

Student Board of Governors $115 

Bethany House-Benedum Commons $55 
Health Insurance $105 



While a general charge is stated for 
Tuition and Fees, this fee may be 
divided into $5,130 for tuition and $500 
for the following activities and services: 
athletics, health service, library, 
lectures, plays, concerts, publications, 
student activities, and laboratory 
services with the exception of music 
and art. 

The Bethany House-Benedum 
Commons Fee is charged to all 
registered students and covers the 
operation and maintenance costs of the 
student union. 

No reduction is made in student 
accounts for course changes made after 
the first two weeks of the semester. The 
College is required to collect a three per 
cent West Virginia sales tax on 
published charges for room and parking 
permits. Bethany reserves the right to 
change, without advance notice, the 
price for room, board and health 
insurance. 

Withdrawals and 
Refunds 

After registration, there is no refund of 
room charges or fees. A student 
voluntarily withdrawing or 
withdrawing because of illness during 
the course of the semester will be 
charged 10 per cent of tuition charges 
for each week of attendance or part 
thereof. There is no refund of tuition 
after the tenth week of attendance. 
There is no refund in the event that a 
student is dismissed or asked to 
withdraw during the course of the 
semester. Board refund is prorated, 
based upon food costs only. Special fees 
are not refundable. 

A student wishing to withdraw from 
Bethany must file written notice with 
the Dean of Students to qualify for 
refund of deposit and adjustment of 
other charges. 



Admission and 
Registration Fees 

Application for Admission 

A non-refundable $15 fee is required at 
the time of formal application. 

Application for Readmission 

Students previously enrolled in Bethany 
College who wish to return for 
additional work must file an Application 
for Readmission with the Registrar's 
Office. A $5 fee is required at the time 
such application is made. 

Registration Deposit 

Upon acceptance for admission or 
readmission, a $100 registration deposit 
is required of all students. Once this 
deposit is paid it is not refunded until 
after graduation or until a Bethany 
student completes the following 
procedure. 

Students not being graduated may have 
the deposit refunded after the last term 
of their attendance if written notice is 
given to the Business Office prior to the 
advance enrollment date for the next 
regular term. Such students may be 
readmitted by approval of the Dean of 
Students and the Business Manager. 

Matriculation Fee 

A $20 fee, payable once by every new 
student, covers, in part, the cost of 
orientation and evaluation procedures 
for new students. 



29 



Fees for Overseas 
Programs 

Oxford: 

$3,900 for one semester for tuition and 
fees, room and board and activity fees. 

Madrid: 

tuition and fees for one semester 
($3,100) includes round-trip air fare, 
tuition and examination fees and 
stipend to sponsor in Madrid. 

Sorbonne: 

tuition and fees for one semester 
($3,100) includes round-trip air fare, 
tuition and stipend to sponsor in Paris. 

Tubingen: 

tuition and fees for one semester 
($3,100) includes round-trip air fare, 
tuition and stipend to sponsor in 
Tubingen. 

Other Special Fees 

Chemistry 490 $20 

Education 470: off-campus student 

teaching (per semester) $2,970 

(includes tuition, fees and preschool 
week board privileges in the 
Bethany dining hall) 
English 284 $15 

Interdisciplinary Studies 100 Sec. 3 $15 
Physical Education 340 $30 

Physical Education 341 $30 

Each academic hour when less 

than 13 $215 

Each academic hour 

in excess of 16 $185 

Auditing a course, per 

semester hour $185 

(a student is not charged if paying 
regular tuition and fees and the total 
program, including the audit, does not 
exceed 18 hours) 




Comprehensive Examination $25 

Graduation fee $35 

Special guidance and advisory fee 

(lire-college) $10 to $25 

Special examinations in any 

department $15 

(there is a $10 charge for each credit 

hour awarded by examination) 

Key deposit for dormitories $5 

(refunded if key is returned) 

Infirmary charge per day $5 

(after the first three days each semester) 

Late registration $3 

(per day) 

Automobile Registration $20 



Art Fees 






Art 105 




$15 


Art 110 




$15 


Art210 




$15 


Art 303 




$15 


Art 304 




$15 


Art 310 




$15 


Art 320 




$5 


Art 325 




$20 


Art 404 




$10 


Art 425 




$20 


Art fees will also be 


required for 




independent study and studio courses 


where departmental 


materials are 


being 


used. 







Music Fees 

Private lessons, two weekly 

$145 per semester 
Private lesson, one weekly 

$80 per semester 
Organ Practice, one hour daily 

$35 per semester 
Instrument Rental 

$10 per semester 
Piano Practice, one hour daily 

$10 per semester 
Voice Practice, one or two hours daily 

$10 per semester 

Breakage Deposits 

Chemistry and physics breakage 
deposits are covered by a $10 breakage 
card which the student purchases each 
semester for every laboratory course in 
which he or she is enrolled. In the event 
breakage exceeds $10, an additional $10 
breakage card must be purchased. 
Unused portions are refunded at the 
end of each academic year. 



30 



Payment of Student 
Accounts 

At registration an invoice is prepared 
for each student, listing all charges due 
for the following semester. Payments 
are due in accordance with the 
following schedule: 

First Semester 

By August 15 a payment of $2,250 
(Balance on account due October 15) 

Second Semester 

By January 15 a payment of $2,250 
(Balance on account due March 15) 

Scholarships and loans may be applied 
as credit against August or January 
initial payment requirements. If after 
application of scholarships and/or loans, 
the balance is less than $2,250, the full 
balance is due and payable by August 15 
for the first semester and January 15 
for the second semester. All special 
student accounts for which total 
semester charges are $2,250, or less are 
payable in full by registration. 

Students will not be permitted to 
register if the initial payment 
requirements for each semester are not 
met, and they may be denied College 
privileges if subsequent payments are 
not completed as scheduled. These 
requirements are in addition to the 
registration deposit. Checks or drafts 
should be made payable to Bethany 
College. 

Bethany College bills for tuition, fees, 
room and board -twice yearly; other 
charges are billed as incurred. Twice 
yearly billings are payable in advance 
by August 15 and January 15 for the fall 
and spring semesters respectively. 



Charges for the fall semester which 
remain unpaid after October 15, and 
charges for the spring semester which 
remain unpaid after March 15 will be 
subject to service charges as per the 
schedule below: 

Accounts past due - a monthly service 
charge of 1.5% on the first $1,500 (18% 
per year) and 1% on any remaining 
balance (12% per year) will be charged 
as of the 25th of each month. 

Students may not take final 
examinations, receive academic credit, 
obtain transcripts or graduate until 
satisfactory arrangements are made to 
cover financial obligations. 

Student Drawing 
Account 

The Business Office provides a limited 
banking service whereby students may 
deposit funds and draw on them as 
required. Students or their parents may 
make deposits to this recommended 
student drawing account which avoids 
the necessity of keeping on hand any 
substantial amount of money. All checks 
for this account must be made payable 
to the Bethany College Student 
Drawing Account. 

Monthly Payment 
Plans 

Bethany has made arrangements with 
the Insured Tuition Payment Plan 
whereby student accounts may be paid 
on a monthly basis during the year. 
Arrangements to use this plan should 
be made prior to the registration 
period. Information may be obtained by 
writing to the Business Office, and 
contract forms may be obtained by 
writing to the Insured Tuition Payment 
Plan, 53 Beacon St., Boston, Mass. 
02108. Contracts are to be completed by 
the parent or guardian of the student 
through direct negotiation with the 
payment plan office. Several other 
plans are also available. Contact the 
business manager. 



Financial Aid 

Bethany believes that the funding of a 
student's education is primarily a family 
responsibility. However, financial 
assistance is available to those students 
whose resources will not fund a 
Bethany education and yet sincerely 
desire to attend. 

All of the College's financial assistance 
programs are awarded through careful 
evaluation of the Financial Aid Form 
(FAF), available from the student's 
guidance counselor. Designation of 
Bethany College as an institution to 
receive the processed information is 
required. All applicants for admission to 
Bethany are sent detailed information 
and instructions regarding the financial 
aid application and awarding processes, 
normally beginning in December. 

Because of the large number of 
applications for financial aid, 
assignment of funds is made according 
to the date applications are processed, 
with April 1 established as the priority 
deadline for all new students. The 
earlier a student completes all 
admission materials and all financial aid 
materials, the faster the student will be 
awarded financial aid. However, the 
FAF must not be completed until after 
January 1 as it also serves as an 
application for the Pell Grant Program. 



31 



A financial-aid applicant whose need for 
assistance has been verified by the 
College Scholarship Service will have 
his or her need met through a variety of 
financial aids, including scholarships, 
grants, loans, and College employment. 
The student has the option of accepting 
any or all of the aid offered. An 
interview with an officer of the College 
once the offer of assistance has been 
made can help to explain any problems. 
The Admission Office or the Financial 
Aid Office helps to arrange these 
interviews. 

Qualifications for 
Scholarships 

Bethany recognizes promise and 
intellectual attainment by awarding a 
number of scholarships. These awards 
vary in value and are available to a 
limited number of entering students. 
Many scholarships are awarded to 
freshmen on a four-year basis but are 
continued from year to year, as needed, 
only if the recipient has met the 
following conditions: 

1) A satisfactory scholarship index 

2) Satisfactory conduct as a student 

3) Worthwhile contributions to the 
college program 

4) Constructive citizenship in the college 
community 

5) Payment of student accounts as 
scheduled 



Scholarships 

All awards are made by the Scholarship 
and Financial Aid Committee in 
accordance with the requirements of 
the particular endowed fund. 

Rob Roy A lexander Scholarship - established 
to provide one or more scholarships for 
worthy and needy men and women, to be 
selected by the president. 

Alumni Scholarship Endowment - 
Established by the Alumni Council in 1981 to 
provide scholarships for children of Bethany 
College alumni. The initial funding for this 
endowment was provided by alumnus and 
Trustee Dr. Rodney B. Hurl. 

Patrick A. and Elizabeth Berry Scholarship 
- established by Miss Sara Cameron to 
assist students from Ohio. 

Bethany Women's Club Scholarship - 
established by the Bethany Women's Club to 
assist needy and worthy students. 

Bison Club Scholarship - provided by 
Bethany alumni with principal interest in 
intercollegiate athletics. 

Stanley F. Bittner Scholarship - established 
by a graduate of the Class of 1916 to provide 
general financial assistance. 

Ashley G. Booth Memorial Scholarship - 
provided by friends of Ashley G. Booth, 
minister of the Christian Church. 

Donald L. Boyd Memorial Scholarship - 
established by family and friends in memory 
of Donald L. Boyd, member of the Class of 
1921 and long-time trustee of the College. 

Jean A. Boyd Scholarship - established by 
bequest from donor. 

Thomas J. Boyd Scholarship - established 
by Thomas J. Boyd, member of the Class of 
1940. 

James B Hrennen III Scholarship 
established by the Will of Virginia Barton 
Brennen as a memorial for her son. 

Jonsie Brink Scholarship - awarded to 
worthy and eligible students. 

Isaac Brown Scholarship - used to cover 
part of the tuition charge. 

Colder Scholarship - established preferably 
for male students from the New England 
area majoring in one of the natural or life 
sciences. 



Argyle Campbell Memorial Scholarship - 
established by family and friends of Mr. 
Campbell to assist worthy and needy 
students. 

Sara M. Cannon Scholarship Endowment - 
Provided by Sara M. Cannon for students 
preparing in the field of Journalism. 

Chapman Scholarship - established by 
Stanton C. Crawford, a member of the class 
of 1918 and former Chancellor of the 
University of Pittsburgh, to honor a pioneer 
frontier family. 

Charnock Family Scholarship - established 
by Miss Ethel Charnock, member of the 
Class of 1912, to assist students at the 
sophomore level or above. 

Class of 1969 Scholarship - provided as a 
scholarship grant to begin with the 1984-85 
college year. First preference will be given 
to descendants of the Class of 1969. 

Class of 1970 Scholarship - provided as a 
scholarship grant to begin with the 1985-86 
college year. First preference will be given 
to descendants of the Class of 1970. 

M. M. Cochran Scholarship - established to 
cover a part of the tuition charge. 

James W. Carty, Jr. Scholarship - 
established by Carl A. Krumbach, a member 
of the class of 1973, to aid worthy students 
interested in journalism. 

JuanitaR. Curr an Scholarship - 
established to provide scholarship assistance 
to worthy students. 

Irene 0. DamaU Scholarship - established 
by Irene 0. Darnell to assist needy and 
worthy students. 

Helen Day Scholarship - awarded to 
members of Zeta Tau Alpha Sorority. 

Marion and Frank Dunn Scholarship — 
established by Frank K. Dunn, former 
Assistant to the President of Bethany 
College, to assist worthy and eligible 
students. 



32 



East Side Christ inn Church of Denver, 
Colorado, Scholarship - given to provide 
modest matching funds for a student at 
Bethany College. 

Ekas-E vans Scholarship - established by 
Dr. and Mrs. Ward Ekas of Rochester, New 
York, whose daughter, Elizabeth Ellen 
Ekas, was a member of the Class of 1957. 

Newton W. and Bessie Evans Scholarship - 
established by Mr. Newton W. Evans, 
former Bursar and Treasurer of Bethany 
College, to assist worthy students. 

Joe A. Funk II Scholarship - established by 
Bethany alumni and friends of the Funk 
family in memory of a young man who lost 
his life in Viet Nam. 

Samuel George Memorial Scholarship - 
established by bequest from the donor to 
provide one-fourth tuition scholarships to all 
graduates of Brooke (West Virginia) High 
School who qualify for admission. 

Greensburg Area Scholarship - established 
anonymously in 1953 to assist students of 
ability and need from the Greensburg, 
Pennsylvania, area. 

AleeceC. Gresham Scholarship - presented 
as assistance to outstanding students in the 
field of music. 

Perry and Alee ce Gresham Scholarship - 
established by Dr. and Mrs. Perry E. 
Gresham to assist worthy and eligible 
students. Special consideration is given to 
young people interested in music or 
philosophy. 




( 'ampbell Allen Harlan Scholarship - 
established by Mr. Campbell Allen Harlan, 
former Bethany College Trustee from 
Detroit, Michigan, to assist students of 
unusual ability in the fine arts. 

Florence M. Hoagland Memorial 
Scholarship - established for needy and 
worthy students by Miss Frances Cables of 
New Hampshire in memory of Florence M. 
Hoagland, Head of the Department of 
English and Advisor for Women at Bethany 
from 1936 to 1946. 

Home Family Scholarship Endowment - 
The Home Family Scholarship Endowment 
will provide assistance each year for a 
student of the Wheeling area preparing for a 
career in business. 

Ida M. Irvin Scholarship - awarded to a 
senior student. 

Flora Isenberg Scholarship - given to 
provide assistance for students of the liberal 
arts and sciences. 

Albert C. Israel Scholarship - used to apply 
to tuition of a descendant of Albert C. Israel. 

Kennedy-Jones Scholarship — provided by 
Violet Kennedy-Jones in honor of her family. 

John H. and Ida H. King Scholarship - 
awarded to students under terms approved 
by Trustees of the College in accordance 
with the will of the donors. 



George A. K miry Scholarship - provided to 
assist worthy West Virginians. 

Forrest H. Kirk pat nek Scholarship - 
established by Dr. Kirkpatrick, member of 
the Class of 1927, to be used to help students 
who are sons or daughters of alumni. Dr. 
Kirkpatrick was a Bethany professor and 
dean for many years. 

Donald E. Lewis Memorial Scholarship - 
established by family, friends, and the Beta 
Beta Chapter of Kappa Alpha Order in 
memory of a graduate of the class of 1933. 

Robert N. "Buzz" Lewis, Jr., Memorial 
Scholarship Endowment - established by 
parents and friends of Robert N. "Buzz" 
Lewis '79, with priority for the utilization of 
the scholarship funds for his fraternity 
brothers in Sigma Alpha Epsilon. 

Emma A. Lyon Scholarship - given to 
memorialize a pioneer Christian missionary 
to China. The endowment was initiated by a 
gift from Mrs. Mary M. Farm of Hawaii. 

Maude Schultz Lytle Scholarship - 
established by friends and family in memory 
of a graduate of the Class of 1915. 

Janet Noll McCready Scholarship - 
established by Donald F. McCready, the 
husband of the late Janet Noll McCready to 
provide financial assistance to worthy 
students. 



33 




Charles L. and Rose Melenyzer Scholarship 

- established by Dr. Charles Melenyzer, 
member of the National Board of Fellows of 
Bethany College, to be used to assist worthy 
young people who attend Bethany. First 
consideration will be given to the young 
people of the Monongahela Valley. 

H. J. Morlan Scholarship - established by 
Halford J. Morlan to assist needy and 
worthy students. 

Louise Birch Myers Scholarship - used to 
promote international, intellectual, and 
cultural understanding through the support 
of scholarships for exchange students. 

William Kimbrough Pendleton Scholarship 

- established to assist students from West 
Virginia by Clarinda Pendleton Lamar in 
memory of her father, William Kimbrough 
Pendleton, member of the first faculty and 
second president of the College. 

Ralph E. Pryor Memorial Scholarship - 
established by family and friends of Judge 
Pryor, a member of the Class of 1942, with 
preference for students from the First 
Judicial Circuit of West Virginia. 

Eli and Lee Rabb Scholarship - used as 
scholarship assistance for students from the 
Upper Ohio Valley. 

Reader's Digest Foundation Scholarship - 
established by the Reader's Digest 
Foundation to assist worthy and needy 
students. 

Herbert and Marguerite Rech Scholarship - 
used to assist needy and eligible students. 

Renner Honor Scholarships - An endowed 
scholarship program funded by the Renner 
Foundation of Cleveland, Ohio, in honor of 
Bethany graduates R. Richard Renner, 
M.D., 17, and his wife, Jennie Steindorf 
Renner, '22, to recognize exceptionally able 
students for their outstanding achievement. 

Edwin K. Resseger, Jr. Memorial 
Scholarship - provided by Mr. and Mrs. 
Kenneth Resseger of the Class of 1933. 

James Derrick Reynolds Memorial 
Scholarship - established by parents and 
friends of a young man who lost his life in 
Viet Nam. 

E. E. Roberts Scholarship - created in 
memory of Professor E. E. Roberts who 
taught journalism at Bethany College from 
1928-1960. 



Louise Ford Rowan Scholarship — 
established in her memory by her son, 
Archibald H. Rowan of Texas, to provide 
financial assistance for a woman student. 

Archibald H. Rowan, Jr. Memorial 
Scholarship - established by Archibald H. 
Rowan of Texas, in memory of his only son. 
It is awarded annually to a male student. 

James J. Sawtell Scholarship Endowment — 
the income to be used each year to support a 
deserving student seeking an education. 

Richard B. ScaJidrett, Jr. , Scholarship - 
established for the purpose of furthering 
international education and understanding. 

Richard L. Schanck Scholarship — 
established by friends in memory of Dr. 
Schanck, Professor of Sociology at Bethany 
College from 1952-1964. 

Elizabeth M. Schrontz Scholarship - 
established by bequest from the estate of 
Elizabeth Schrontz from Washington, 
Pennsylvania. 

Richard H. Slavin, Jr., Memorial 
Scholarship - given in memory of a 
graduate of the Class of 1950 who served as 
a Bethany faculty member from 1956-63. 

Paul Smyth Memorial Scholarship 
Endowment - established by his wife, Sue 
Culbert Smyth, '68, and parents Mr. and 
Mrs. John H. Smyth, and friends, in memory 
of Paul Smyth '68, who gave his life in 
service to country. 

Adelaide E. and Arthur C. Stifel 
Scholarship - established by Mr. and Mrs. 
Arthur C. Stifel of Wheeling, West Virginia. 



34 



Peter Tarr Heritage Scholarship - 
established by Geneva Tarr Elliott, member 
of the Class of 1927, to provide scholarship 
assistance to students in memory of the Tarr 
family's association with Bethany College 
since the days of its founding. 

Russell I. Todd Scholarship - a general 
scholarship endowment with preference for 
students planning to enter a health 
associated career. 

Stewart King Tweedy Memorial Scholarship 
- established by Mr. and Mrs. H. L. Tweedy 
and friends in memory of their son, member 
of the Class of 1964, who was killed in 
Viet Nam. 

W. W. Vines Scholarship Endowment - 
provided by a business associate of W. W. 
Vines, S. John Nitta, the income to be used 
each year to support a deserving student 
seeking an education. 

William H. Vodrey Scholarship - 
established by Mr. William H. Vodrey, a 
member of the Class of 1894, to assist 
students from the East Liverpool, Ohio, 
area. 

Nannine Clay Wallis Scholarship - given to 
provide financial assistance for students, 
preferably from Kentucky, enrolled at 
Bethany. 

Campbell-Hagerman-Watson Memorial 
Scholarship - established by a bequest from 
the estate of Mrs. Virginia Hagerman 
Watson, a member of the Class of 1904, to 
provide support for foreign exchange 
students. 

G. A. Willett Scholarship - established to 
cover part of the tuition charge. The student 
receiving this scholarship is to be nominated 
by a member of the Willett family. 



Designated 
Scholarships 

The following endowment scholarship 
funds have been established to assist 
students preparing for church-related 
vocations: 

Florence A bercrombie Scholarship - 
established by a bequest from the estate of 
Florence Abercrombie. 

Ada P. Bennett Memorial Scholarship - 
established by 0. E. Bennett, a member of 
the Class of 1925, and family and friends. 

Osborne Booth Scholarship - named after a 
long-time member of the Bethany faculty to 
provide financial assistance for students 
preparing for the ministry. 

Brightwood Christian Church Timothy 
Scholarship - established by members of 
the Brightwood Christian Church, Bethel 
Park, Pennsylvania. 

LottaA. Calkins Scholarship - established 
by a bequest from the estate of Lotta A. 
Calkins. 

Thomas Richard Deming Scholarship - 
established by friends, family, and members 
of the First Christian Church, Charleston, 
West Virginia. 

Elliott Family Memorial Scholarship Fund 
- established by Virgil and Geneva Elliott 
in honor of his mother and father, P. W. 
Elliott and Ella May Morse Elliott, and his 
brother, Victor Douglas Elliott. The purpose 
of the fund is to provide financial aid to 
ministerial students participating in varsity 
athletics. 

Fairhill Manor Christian Church Timothy 
Scholarship - established by the 
Washington, Pennsylvania, congregation. 

William Robert and Mary Leona Standefer 
Foster Memorial Scholarship - Established 
in 1981 by Ruby L. Wooten in memory of her 
father and mother, William Robert Foster 
and Mary Leona Standefer Foster. The 
scholarships from this fund are to be 
awarded to young men and women who are 
members of the Christian Church (Disciples 
of Christ). 

Jenny Irvin Hayes Scholarship - 
established by Jenny Irvin Hayes, a member 
of the Class of 1904. 



Harry L. and Eva Ice Timothy Ministerial 
Scholarship - established by Mr. and Mrs. 
Robert H. Lee of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, 
honoring Dr. and Mrs. Ice in recognition of 
Dr. Ice's productive and untiring work in 
establishing and building Bethany's Timothy 
Ministerial Training Program. 

Maude Zeta G. McCracken Scholarship — 
established by a bequest of Maude Garlock 
McCracken, a member of the First Christian 
Church of Wheeling, for assistance to 
ministerial students. 

William H. McKinney Scholarship - 
established by family and friends in memory 
of a Bethany graduate of the Class of 1923 
to provide assistance for students preparing 
for church vocations. 

Isaac Mills Scholarship - provided to cover 
part of the tuition charge of a ministerial 
student. 

Herbert Moninger Scholarship - established 
in memory of Mr. Herbert Moninger, a 
graduate of the Class of 1898. 

Edward S. and Ruthella Hukill Moreland 
Scholarship - provided by members of the 
Walnut Hills Christian Church, Cincinnati, 
Ohio, and friends of an outstanding Disciple 
leader who was graduated from Bethany 
College in 1927. 

Mr. and Mrs. Arch R. Morgan Scholarship 

- established by these friends of Bethany 
College from Seattle, Washington. 

Parsons Memorial Timothy Scholarship - 
established by the Heights Christian Church, 
Shaker Heights, Ohio, and friends in 
memory of Dorothy and Waymon Parsons 
for dedicated leadership to this church and 
Brotherhood of Christian Churches 
(Disciples of Christ). 

E. J. and Imogene Penhorwood Scholarship 

- named for a Bethany graduate of the 
Class of 1918 to provide assistance for 
students preparing for the ministry. 



35 



Perry Scholarship - established in memory 
of Professor and Mrs. E. Lee Perry. 
Professor Perry was a member of the Class 
of 1893, Professor of Latin at the College 
from 1908 to 1939, and Professor Emeritus 
from 1939 to 1948. 

Reed-Law Ministerial Scholarship 
Endowment - provided by the Christian 
Church of Plymouth, Pennsylvania, in 
memory of the Reed family and Dr. Marjorie 
Reed Law, long-time members of that 
congregation. 

Rosemary Roberts Memorial Scholarship - 
established by family and friends in memory 
of a Bethany graduate of the Class of 1942 
to provide assistance for a woman preparing 
for Christian service. 

Sala Family Memorial Scholarship - 
established by Dr. John R. Sala, Class of 
1926, former Dean of the Faculty at Bethany 
College. 

Minnie W. Schaefer Scholarship - awarded 
to students preparing for Christian service. 

Edith and Chester A. Sillars Scholarship - 
established by Chester A. Sillars, former 
Director of Church Relations at Bethany 
College. 

Charles C. Smith Scholarship - established 
by family and friends in memory of Mr. and 
Mrs. C. C. Smith whose lives were dedicated 
to the Christian ministry. 

J. T. Smith Scholarship - established by Mr. 
J. T. Smith, friend of Bethany from 
Memphis, Tennessee. 

John E. Sugden, Jr. Fund - established to 
assist in the form of either loans or grants. 

Harriett Mortimore Toomey and John M. 
Toomey Scholarship - established by John 
C. Toomey and friends to assist students in 
musical education. 



Robert S. and Marie J. Tuck Scholarship - 
established by members of the Central 
Christian Church, Wooster, Ohio, where the 
Tucks, both Bethany graduates, served for 
44 years. 

HollisL. Turley Scholarship - established 
by a bequest from the estate of Hollis L. 
Turley, a member of the Class of 1925 and 
former Bethany trustee. 

Vinson Memorial Scholarship - established 
by Z. T. Vinson, Class of 1878, through the 
Central Christian Church, Huntington, West 
Virginia. 

Raymond E. and Eunice M. Weed 
Scholarship - established by Dr. Raymond 
Weed, former curator of the Campbell 
Mansion near Bethany. 

Josiah N. and Wilminia S. Wilson 
Scholarship - established by Josiah N. 
Wilson to assist students preparing for the 
Christian ministry. 

The following endowed scholarship 
funds have been established to assist 
students from backgrounds of the 
Christian Church (Disciples of Christ): 

Fannie M. Bennett National Cam.pbell 
Scholarship - established by a gift from the 
estate of Fannie Bennett who was a member 
of the Class of 1926. 

Ben and Leona Brown Scholarship - 
established by Mrs. Leona Brown of 
Washington, Pennsylvania, in memory of her 
husband. 

Jessie M. and Frank P. Fiess National 
Campbell Scholarship - established by Mr. 
and Mrs. Frank P. Fiess whose daughters, 
June Fiess Shackelford, Emma Lee Fiess 
Baldwin, and Frances Fiess Caldwell, were 
members of the Classes of 1941, 1944, and 
1959, respectively. 

V. J. Hopkins and Mary L. Hopkins 
Scholarship - operated under the principles 
of the National Campbell Scholarship 
program. 

National Campbell Scholarships - 
established in memory and honor of 
Alexander Campbell for the purpose of 
developing able and dedicated lay leadership 
in the Christian Church. Awards are in 
recognition of Christian service and 
academic accomplishment. 




36 



Richmond Avenue Christian Church of 
Buffalo Scholarship - established for 
students enrolled at Bethany from Western 
New York and preferably of Disciple 
background. 

Webster Groves Christian Church 
Scholarship - designed to provide financial 
assistance for students coming from the 
Christian Church (Disciples of Christ), 
preferably from Missouri. This scholarship 
was established in honor of Dr. Perry E. 
Gresham, twelfth president of Bethany 
College, and his wife, Aleece. 

External Thist 
Scholarships 

Through trust funds established in 
major banking houses, the following 
scholarship awards are available: 

Nelson Evans Cook Scholarship - created to 
memorialize an outstanding metallurgist by 
providing financial assistance for chemistry 
students. 

Catherine Graves Scholarship - given to a 
Bethany student from Wheeling, W. Va., in 
accordance with an educational trust fund 
established in the Pittsburgh National Bank. 

Hayes Picklesimer Scholarship - 
established by the West Virginia Emulation 
Endowment Trust to provide scholarship 
help for residents of West Virginia. 

William A. Stanley Scholarship - 
established by an outstanding West Virginia 
churchman who had lengthy careers in both 
education and business. 

Peter T. Whitaker Scholarship - created by 
a young graduate who found at Bethany the 
kind of education he sought. 



Sustained Awards 

A limited number of financial grants 
are available from the following 
annually sustained programs: 

H. L. Berkman Foundation Scholarship - 
provides an award for one or more students 
residing in the Upper Ohio Valley. 

A. Dale Fiers Ministerial Athletic 
Scholarship - awarded to recognize and 
encourage the scholastic and athletic skill of 
an outstanding upperclassman preparing for 
the Christian ministry. 

Scripps Howard Foundation Scholarship - 
provides assistance to journalism majors. 

Loan Funds 

The following loan funds have been 
established to assist students under the 
general supervision of the Scholarship 
and Financial Aid Committee: 

William G. and Carrie E. Bunyan Student 
Aid Fund - established by a bequest from 
the estate of the late Mrs. Bunyan of 
Brockway, Pennsylvania. 

Carman Loan Fund - established in honor 
of Martha Cox Carman of the Class of 1916 
and Forrest A. Carman of the Class of 1914 
by their son, Donald C. Carman. 

Charles N. and Edna Scott Jarrett Memorial 
Ministerial Loan Fund - established by 
their sons, friends and relatives to provide 
assistance for preministerial students. 

Meril and Marguertie May Student Loan 
Fund - established by Mr. and Mrs. Meril 
May of Garrettsville, Ohio. 

J. West Mitchell Medical Loan Fund - 
provided to assist premedical 
undergraduates and Bethany graduates 
enrolled in accredited medical schools. 

Phillips Loan Fund - established in 1890 by 
Thomas W. Phillips, Sr., of New Castle, 
Pennsylvania. 

Renner-Steindorf Student Loan Fund - 
established by Dr. R. R. Renner and his wife, 
Jennie Steindorf Renner, of Cleveland, Ohio. 

Ethel E. Sivon Student Loan Fund - 
established by family, friends, and members 
of the First Christian Church of Ravenna, 
Ohio. 




37 



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Academic 
Program 

The Bethany Plan 

Thoroughly based in the liberal arts 
tradition, the Bethany Plan is designed 
to help students develop the capacities 
to be intelligent, useful, free, and 
responsible persons. Its aim is to meet 
the educational needs of the individual 
while insuring breadth, depth, and 
integration of knowledge. 

The Plan recognizes the need for both 
individuality and common learning. 
Each person is unique, possessing goals 
and interests that are different from 
others. Consequently, a rich variety of 
learning opportunities are provided as 
options from which the student may 
choose. These include classroom-based 
and out-of-class programs ranging from 
seminars, lecture courses, independent 
studies, and laboratories to competitive 
sports, musical and dramatic 
productions, and student government 
(to name but a few). Many off -campus 
activities are also available, including 
study abroad. 

At the same time, these learning 
opportunities are set within a 
framework of common educational 
goals and programs which are 
organized to provide direction and 
guidance as well as independence and 




choice. The learning goals of the college 
are clearly stated (see page 6) and 
govern all aspects of education at 
Bethany. 

The Bethany Plan includes a carefully 
constructed set of distinctive 
educational programs. Along with 
traditional fields of concentration in the 
academic disciplines or the option of an 
individually designed, interdisciplinary 
major, all students complete a 
Freshman Seminar and an 
Interdisciplinary Lecture Course, the 
Perspectives Program, four 
Practicums, the Writing Qualification 
Program, a Senior Project, and Senior 
Comprehensive Examinations. In 
addition, many elect one of the 
Professional Cores, Independent Study, 
a January Term Course, or Study 
Abroad. 



Academic Calendar 

The Bethany calendar consists of two 
15-week semesters and a four-week 
voluntary interim session in January: 
The Fall semester - September to 
before Christmas; the Spring semester 
- February to the end of May; and the 
January Term - a voluntary session 
which students may elect to use for 
intensive study on campus or for off- 
campus work. 

Some courses are offered over the full 
15 weeks; others, for the first or second 
half of the semester. This division 
provides additional flexibility for 
students to do off-campus study and 
internships. 



39 




Academic Advisor 

The student-advisor relationship is the 
cornerstone of a Bethany education. 
The student and his or her advisor work 
together to develop appropriate 
classroom and experience-based 
programs. If not during private 
meetings, freshmen see their advisor 
two times a week during the first 
semester to discuss work in the 
freshman seminar. 

Usually during the sophomore year, 
students select a major field of 
concentration, thus transferring to an 
advisor associated with their major area 
of interest. 



40 



Requirements for 
Graduation 

The Bachelor of Arts degree is 
conferred upon the student who 
satisfactorily completes the following 
requirements: 

1) 128 semester hours with a minimum 
cumulative grade point average of 2.0 

2) a freshman seminar 

3) a freshman interdisciplinary lecture 
course 

4) the perspectives program 

5) Religious Studies 100 

6) a field of concentration 

7) demonstrated proficiency in 
expository writing 

8) a senior project 

9) the comprehensive examination in 
the major field 

10) the practicum requirement 

11) the residence requirement 

12) attendance at the commencement 
exercise 

The degree of Bachelor of Science may 
be conferred upon a student who 
completes the Bachelor of Arts 
requirements and who chooses to major 
in any one of the following 
departments: biology, chemistry, 
computer science, mathematics, 
physics, or psychology (B.S. plan). 



Freshman Studies 
Program 

Freshman Seminar: All entering 
freshmen enroll in a freshman seminar 
during the fall semester of the 
freshman year. The professor directing 
the seminar also serves as the student's 
advisor. 

Freshman Interdisciplinary Course: 
Freshmen elect a freshman 
interdisciplinary course in the spring 
semester of the freshman year. 

For descriptions of the courses offered 
in this program see pages 51-52. 

Practicum Program 

The practicum program is a progressive 
effort to make a student's academic 
studies more relevant to the everyday 
world. The practicums are practical 
experiences encompassing values 
Bethany believes to be essential to a 
complete education. 

Students complete four practicums in a 
non-classroom setting in which they 
actualize the goals of the College. These 
four practicums are (1) an example of 
responsible citizenship, (2) an 
awareness and involvement in health, 
physical education and recreation, 
(3) an intercultural living experience, 
and (4) a vocationally oriented 
placement. The successful completion of 
the four practicums is required for 
graduation. 

Each practicum experience should be a 
self-examination of values related to 
that practicum; a demonstration that 
liberal studies are relevant to personal 
development and to the fulfillment of 
obligations as a citizen. 



With the assistance of the student's 
advisor and the director of practicums, 
the student develops practicum 
proposals. These proposals must have 
the approval of a faculty member and 
meet the guidelines established for each 
practicum. After each practicum, the 
student completes an evaluation of the 
experience. 

The development of meaningful 
practicum experiences is an important 
part of the academic program, and the 
College is committed to providing 
competent counseling and assistance to 
the students. 

Seniors must fulfill all proposals by 
February 10 and all evaluations by April 
15 of the graduation year. 

Further information concerning the 
practicum program may be obtained by 
contacting the director of practicums. 

Perspectives 
Program 

It is expected that all Bethany 
graduates develop eight perspectives on 
their world, each of which is, in 
appropriate ways, systematic, ethical, 
and integrative. The eight perspectives 
are historical, global, religious, 
aesthetic, scientific, quantitative, social, 
and personal. 

To this end, every student must 
complete at least four hours chosen 
among the courses in each of the 
perspectives categories listed below, 
plus at least eight additional hours for a 
total of forty hours in the program. No 



more than eight hours can count toward 
fulfillment of the requirement in any 
one category. 

The list of approved courses may 
change from year to year. Only courses 
taken in the year they appear on the 
approved list will count toward 
fulfillment of the requirement. 

Historical Foundations: to achieve a 
knowledgeable view of basic aspects of 
the origins and the modern background 
of Western civilization 
Art 351-352, 353-354, 355-356, 357; 
Communications 401; English 325, 
326, 330, 341, 342, 370; French 313; 

351, 352; German 351, 352; History 

100, 201, 202, 301, 302; Music 241, 
242; Philosophy 323, 324, 325; 
Physical Education 244; Spanish 351, 

352, 353; Theatre 145. 

Global Awareness: to gain an 
appreciation and understanding of the 
diversity of the world's cultures, not 
only Western but non-Western 

Art 358; Communications 403; 

French 301; History 426; 

Interdisciplinary Studies 201, 202, 

204; Religious Studies 342; Spanish 

301. 

Judaeo-Christian Tradition: to 

understand the religious tradition of the 
West, particularly the Judaeo-Christian 
tradition, including the study of the 
Bible 

Religious Studies 100, 300; English 

288. 

Aesthetic Judgment: to develop an 
ability to discriminate among various 
aesthetic forms and values and to gain a 
basic appreciation of the arts 
Art 105, 110; English 140, 150, 
255-256, 257-258, 261-262, 263-264, 
270, 273-274, 351; Fine Arts 201, 202; 
Philosophy 358. 

Experimental Science: to learn how to 
explore the natural world through 
scientific investigation, including both 
first-hand laboratory (or field) 
experience and inquiry into the 
humanistic implications of the sciences 

Biology 100; Chemistry 100, 101, 102; 

Interdisciplinary Studies 210; Physics 

101, 102; Psychology 100. 



Quantitative Reasoning: to achieve a 
knowledgeable view of analytical and 
quantitative ways of examining the 
world 
Computer Science 201; Mathematics 
103, 201, 281; Philosophy 123; 
Psychology 103. 

Social Institutions: to grasp the basic 
organizing principles, structures, 
policies, and governing ideas of Western 
social (economic, political, etc.) 
institutions 
Communications 101, 304, 402; 
Economics 200; Physical Education 
243, 280; Political Science 225; Social 
Work 120, 230; Sociology 100, 205, 
210, 351, 356. 

Human Personality and Behavior: to 

establish insight into the ways human 
beings understand themselves and their 
behavior and development 
Education 201, 202; Philosophy 100, 
124, 252, 355; Physical Education 
290; Psychology 186, 325, 326; 
Religious Studies 283; Social Work 
310; Sociology 220. 

All courses taken to satisfy perspectives 
and field of concentration requirements 
must be taken on a graded basis. All 
students are required to pass Religious 
Studies 100. Generally, this course is 
taken in the freshman or sophomore 
year, and it may be used to fulfill part of 
the perspectives program requirements. 
Students should not enroll in 
Quantitative Reasoning courses until 
they have counseled with their advisors 
regarding the results of the freshman 
diagnostic test in quantitative skills. 



41 



Field of 
Concentration 

The field of concentration may be either 
departmental or faculty-student 
initiated. The following guidelines 
specifically exclude any language 
requirements necessary for professional 
certification or for admission to a 
graduate program. 

A departmental field consists of a 
minimum of 24 credit hours (excluding 
the senior project) and a maximum of 
48 hours within the department. No 
more than 24 hours from related 
disciplines may be required by a 
department. 

The faculty-sponsored or student- 
initiated field, which may cut across 
departmental lines, may be developed. 
This interdisciplinary field of 
concentration requires the approval of 
the Committee on Interdisciplinary 
Study. Such fields consist of a minimum 
of 24 hours (excluding the senior 
project) and a maximum of 72 hours. 
No more than 48 hours in any one 
department will be counted toward 
graduation. Examples of faculty- 
sponsored programs approved by the 
Committee on Interdisciplinary Study 
include a Mathematics-Physics program 
for pre-engineering and a Sports- 
Communications program. The 
interdisciplinary studies program is 
described on page 93. 



Writing Proficiency 
Requirement 

All students must achieve and maintain 
an above-average level of proficiency in 
expository writing. They may do this 
either by taking the annual Writing 
Qualification Test or by satisfactory 
completion of selected writing courses 
offered by the English Department. 

Students who choose to satisfy the 
requirement by enrolling in writing 
courses may do so by electing from the 
following: English 101-109, 120, 125, 
140, 150, 205, 210, 213, or 351. No more 
than one course per academic year will 
apply to the requirement. See below for 
the number of courses needed to satisfy 
the writing proficiency requirement. 

The Department of English will certify 
to the Registrar that a student has 
satisfied the writing proficiency 
requirement for graduation when 
proficiency has been demonstrated in 
one of the following ways: 

1. By achieving a high level of 
proficiency on both the first Writing 
Qualification Test, taken in November 
of the freshman year, and the second 
Writing Qualification Test, taken in 
April of the sophomore year; or by 
achieving a grade of C + or better in a 
writing course taken instead of either 
or both of these tests. A student whose 
proficiency is certified in this way is 
not required to take additional tests or 
courses. 

2. By taking the first Writing 
Qualification Test in November of the 
freshman year and achieving a high 
level of proficiency on the third test, 
taken in April of the junior year. 

Students who have not met the writing 
proficiency requirement before the 
beginning of their seventh semester must 
enroll in English 120, a non-credit, non- 



graded course in expository writing. 
Special Writing Qualification Tests are 
given as part of this course, and 
students must continue in the course 
until they have achieved a high level of 
proficiency on one of the special tests. 
Special Writing Qualification Tests are 
given to seniors only when enrolled in 
the course. 

Special arrangements are made for 
students who transfer from other 
colleges. Transfer students should 
consult the Department of English 
immediately upon enrolling at Bethany. 

Additional information about the 
Writing Qualification Tests and courses 
may be found on page 77. 

Senior Project 

Every student must produce a project 
which meets the standards of his or her 
field of concentration. The project is 
received and evaluated during the final 
semester of the senior year. Two to 
eight hours of credit are given after the 
final evaluation and approval of the 
project. Scheduling of the project is at 
the discretion of the department or the 
student's advisory committee. 

The project is evaluated by at least one 
person in the field of concentration 
other than the student's advisor(s). The 
final evaluation is made in consultation 
with the student. The project is made 
available to the College community. 



42 



Senior 

Comprehensive 

Examination 

Each student must pass the Senior 
Comprehensive Examination. All 
requirements in the field of 
concentration must be met and the 
student must have senior standing and 
a 2. cumulative average in the field of 
concentration before the examination 
may be taken. 

The examination consists of two parts, 
written and oral. In some departments, 
sections of the Undergraduate Record 
Examination may also be considered 
part of or prerequisite to the Senior 
Comprehensive. 



The examination is given twice yearly, 
in January and in May. The oral part of 
the examination is scheduled by the 
registrar as soon as practicable after 
the written, but in no case more than 
two weeks later. 

Seniors who have completed all the 
requirements in their field of 
concentration may take the 
examination in January with the 
consent of their advisor(s). 

Students failing the examination may 
take it again in May. 

Students in departments which consider 
sections of the Undergraduate or 
Graduate Record Examination as part 
of the Senior Comprehensive 
Examination take the URE or GRE 
immediately preceding their written 
and oral examinations. 




Students who fail the examination may 
take it at any time it is regularly given 
within the following 12 months. If they 
fail a second time, they may petition the 
faculty for a re-examination during the 
following year. No student may take the 
examination more than three times. 

Policy on Work 
Internships 

A student may spend a semester 
combining practical professional 
experience with formal off-campus 
study. A student wishing to do this 
must arrange a full-time job in his or 
her chosen area and arrange 
independent study integrating this 
work experience with formal theoretical 
study. 

A written proposal, signed by the 
department in which the student 
intends to earn academic credit, must 
be submitted to the Curriculum Review 
Board of the College. This proposal 
must also be signed by the faculty 
member charged with supervising and 
evaluating the project. The proposal 
must include a description of the 
student's goals in undertaking the 
program, a description of the 
experience that includes a summary of 
his or her responsibilities and the name 
of his or her supervisor, a description of 
the formal independent study course 
work, an explanation of the way in 
which the program relates the work 
experience and the formal independent 
study course work, and a description of 
the methods to be used in supervising 
and evaluating the entire project. 

Eight credit-hours will be awarded for 
satisfactory completion of the project. 
No additional academic work may be 
taken during the semester of the 
project. 



43 



Residence 
Requirement 

Four years are usually required to 
satisfy the course and residence 
requirements for the baccalaureate 
degree. Students of superior ability 
may complete the requirements in less 
time. As a rule, the senior year or the 
last two semesters are to be spent in 
residence at the College. However, 
students who have had one full year of 
residence previous to their senior year, 
and who apply for and are approved by 
the Policy Appeals Board for off- 
campus study programs during their 
senior year, may sometimes be 
permitted to count that work toward 
graduation requirements. 

Information and guidelines concerning 
specific off -campus programs are given 
in subsequent sections of the catalog. 

Independent Study 

Each department offers independent 
study for those students who have 
demonstrated the ability to work 
individually in some area of special 
interest. The student selects an area of 
study, subject to the approval of the 
head of the department, after which he 
or she completes an Application for 
Independent Study in the Registrar's 
Office before the start of that semester. 




January Term 

The January Term provides 
opportunities for students to 
supplement and extend the learning 
experiences available during the 
traditional academic year. In January, 
students may participate in 
experimental courses, study single 
topics intensively, travel and study in 
various parts of the world, undertake 
an independent study, or fulfill a 
practicum. 

During January, course offerings at 
other colleges across the country, 
including many foreign and domestic 
travel programs, are open to Bethany 
students through an exchange program. 

Participation in the January Term is 
entirely voluntary. 

Summer Terms 

There are two five-week summer terms 
and an 11-week independent study 
period. Most summer school courses are 
taught as seminars, tutorials, or 
independent studies. For additional 
information, consult with the director 
of the summer school. 



Cooperative U.S. 
Study Offerings 

Academic Common Market 

Bethany is a member of the Academic 
Common Market, an interstate 
agreement among southern states for 
sharing academic programs. This 
agreement allows Bethany students, 
who qualify for admission, to apply for 
enrollment in 80 graduate degree 
programs in other common market 
states on an in-state tuition basis. This 
program is sponsored by the Southern 
Regional Education Board. Further 
information concerning the Academic 
Common Market may be obtained by 
contacting the Office of Career and 
Professional Development. 

Engineering Programs 

Special arrangements have been made 
with Case-Western Reserve University 
(The Combined Plan), Columbia 
University in New York City (The 
Combined Plan), Georgia Institute of 
Technology in Atlanta (Dual-Degree 
Program), and Washington University 
in St. Louis (Three-Two Plan) for 
students interested in becoming 
professional engineers or applied 
scientists. 

Students participating in one of these 
programs spend three years in the 
liberal arts environment at Bethany 
College and then attend either Case- 
Western, Columbia, Georgia Tech, or 
Washington University for an 
additional two years. The programs 
permit the student to earn both a 
bachelor's degree from Bethany and a 
B.S. in engineering or applied science 
from the cooperating engineering 
school upon completion of the five-year 
sequence. 



44 




The broad educational experience 
gained at Bethany and the engineering 
school is aimed at producing engineers 
and applied scientists who are better 
prepared to meet the social, political, 
economic, and environmental problems 
of today's world. 

Entering freshmen who are interested 
in this program should select the 
appropriate level calculus course and 
either Chemistry 101 or Physics 201, 
depending on their career interest. This 
will allow for maximum freedom in 
course selection and career choice in 
subsequent semesters. Interested 
students should consult with the 
engineering advisor at their earliest 
convenience. 



Washington Semester 

Arrangements have been made for one 
or two advanced students in history, 
political science, economics, or 
sociology to pursue studies in these 
fields under the direction of the 
American University in Washington, 
D.C. A student participating in this 
plan takes six to nine hours in regular 
academic work and six to nine hours in 
the study of government supervised by 
Bethany College and American 
University. Participants in the program 
must be recommended by the program 
advisor and have the approval of the 
Dean of the Faculty. 

The Department of Political Science 
and History administers a program in 
conjunction with the West Virginia 
University Foundation in which an 
outstanding junior or senior is selected 
each year to spend one week in 
Charleston studying three branches of 
state government. Two hours of credit 
may be granted for this program. 




45 



Overseas Study 
Offerings 

Under approved supervision and 
direction, qualified students may secure 
credit for formal work completed in 
foreign colleges and universities. To be 
eligible for study abroad, the student 
should normally be a junior and must 
have the approval of the External 
Programs Committee. 

Madrid Study Program 

Under special arrangement with the 
University of Madrid, qualified Bethany 
students may enroll for a semester or 
full year at the university. 

Oxford Semester 

Under this program, approximately 20 
students spend the fall semester in 
Oxford, England, studying British 
literature, history, and culture with a 
Bethany professor. Participants are 
matriculated as full-time students at 
Bethany College, but live and study in 
Britain. 

Paris Sorbonne Program 

Under special arrangement with the 
Sorbonne, qualified Bethany students 
may enroll for a semester or full year in 
its Cours de Langue et de Civilisation 
Francaise. Bethany's official 
representative in Paris serves as 
counselor to Bethany students during 
their stay at the Sorbonne. 



Tubingen Study Program 

Qualified students are given an 
opportunity to do intensive study in the 
German language and to work out an 
individualized program at the 
University of Tubingen, Germany. An 
adjunct member of the Bethany faculty 
serves as mentor. 

Other Overseas Programs 

There are additional overseas programs 
in which Bethany students have 
participated. These include: 

1) Beaver College Semester at the City 
College of London (England) 

2) University of Glasgow, Scotland 

3) American University, Beirut, 
Lebanon 

The coordinator of international 
education programs provides interested 
students with information concerning 
programs which have been examined 
and approved. 

Continuing 
Education Program 

Believing that education is a life-long 
process, Bethany has instituted a non- 
degree, non-traditional program of 
continuing education within the 
framework of the liberal arts tradition 
of the College. The Leadership Center 
for Continuing Education serves as the 
physical setting for the vast majority of 
instructional activities in this program. 

Continuing Education Units (CEUs) are 
awarded (one for every 10 contract 
hours) to participants in the program. 
The Registrar's Office maintains a 
continuing education transcript for each 
participant. 

Most continuing education programs at 
Bethany comprise intensive, short- 
term, residential and off-campus 
seminars, institutes, courses and 
workshops which are aimed at assisting 
people of all ages and backgrounds to 
deal with the complexities of modern 
living. 




Some of the offerings are developed by 
Bethany's faculty and staff while others 
are conducted by a broad spectrum of 
business, industrial, educational, 
professional, and church organizations 
which bring their students and 
educational formats to the Leadership 
Center. 



46 



External Programs 

Bethany College operates a number of 
external programs to meet the 
continuing needs of the community and 
the region. By meeting these needs 
through its external programs, Bethany 
College is able to adjust to change and 
monitor the educational pulse of the 
area. 

Leadership Center 

Leadership Center, Bethany's award 
winning conference center, is first 
choice of the top Fortune 500 
companies for conference and 
management seminars. Current course 
offerings in the Center's Executive 
Development Program include 
"Management," based on United States 
Steel's series, "Engineering Project 
Management," "Processes in Decision 
Making," and "Management Principles." 
Plans call for continued expansion of 
the Executive Development series to 
meet the training needs of area 
business and industry. 

Leadership Center is the only solar- 
powered satellite training site in the 
world. 

Summer Programming 

Each summer, thousands are involved 
in band, tennis and church camps 
conducted on the Bethany College 
campus. More than 2,500 were on 
campus last summer for programs 
which included as many as 500 to 600 
participants and as few as six. Church 
groups from throughout the nation 
spend a few days or more than a week 



in Conference. Schools from Ohio, 
Pennsylvania and West Virginia send 
their bands to campus for week-long 
practice and training. Tennis, for both 
juniors and adults, attract hundreds. 
Retreats and performing arts 
workshops are among the activities 
included in summer programming, and 
soccer camps and boys' and girls' sports 
camps round out the summer program 
schedule. 

Policy on 

Cross-Listed 

Courses 

When a course which is part of a 
department's requirements for its field 
of concentration is cross-listed, a 
student concentrating in that field may 
register for the course in any 
department in which it is cross-listed, 
but it will count as part of the 
maximum credit which may be earned 
by the student within the department of 
his or her field of concentration. 

Course Load 

A normal semester load is 16 hours. 
However, a student may elect activities 
courses (music, chorus, band, physical 
education) up to two hours with no 
additional fee charge. For example, a 
student could elect a one-hour activity 
course, two one-hour activity courses, 
or a two-hour activity course. Thus, the 
maximum academic course load is 16 
hours plus two hours of activities 
courses. Permission to take additional 
courses must be obtained from the 
Dean of the Faculty. Fees will be 
charged for any such approved courses. 
Applications for excess hours are 
available in the Registrar's Office. A 
full-time student is defined as any 
student carrying at least 12 hours per 
semester. 




47 







Grading System 

Letter grades given and their 
equivalents in quality points are: 



A 


4.00 


A- 


3.75 


B + 


3.25 


B 


3.00 


B- 


2.75 


C + 


2.25 


c 


2.00 


c- 


1.75 


D + 


1.25 


D 


1.00 


D- 


.75 


F 


.00 



Students are required to take at least 
100 hours of letter-graded work. 

Grades mean: A, Superior; B, 
Excellent; C, Average; D, Below 
Average; F, Failure. 



Other report abbreviations and their 
meanings are: 

Cr. Credit. No quality points. 

NCr. No-Credit. No quality points or 
academic penalty. 

F. Failure. No quality points; denotes 
work that is unsatisfactory. 

Inc. Incomplete. Incomplete work is a 
result of sickness or some other 
justifiable reason. An incomplete must 
be removed by the end of the fourth 
week of the following semester, unless 
an extension of time is granted by the 
Dean of the Faculty. It is not possible 
for a student to remove an incomplete 
after 12 months. 

W. Withdrawn. No penalty. 

WF. Withdrawn failing. No quality 
points; indicates a course dropped with 
permission after the fifth week of the 
semester, with the student failing at the 
time of withdrawal. A grade of WF has 
the same effect on the student's grade- 
point average as an F. 

Any student who carries 12 hours of 
letter-graded academic work may elect 
to take additional work on a Credit-No 
Credit basis in courses which are not 
used for the field of concentration or 
the distribution requirement. 

A report of the scholastic standing of 
students is received at the Registrar's 
Office at mid- semester in addition to 
the final semester reports. These 
reports are sent to the faculty advisor 
and the parents or guardians of each 
student. 



Change of Schedule 

During the first five class days of each 
semester, a student, with the approval 
of his advisor, may drop or add any 
course. No classes may be added after 
this time. With proper approval, a 
student may drop a course any time 
before the final. 

Classification of 
Students 

For sophomore rank a student must 
have at least 25 hours of academic 
credit. Admission to full junior standing 
is conditioned upon the student having 
at least 60 hours of academic credit. 
For senior class rank the student must 
have at least 94 hours of academic 
credit. 

Students are not considered candidates 
for the baccalaureate degree until they 
have been granted senior classification, 
have filed an application to take the 
Senior Comprehensive Examination in 
their field of concentration, and have 
filed an application for a degree. 

Class Attendance 



Policy 



Students are expected to attend all 
classes and appropriate laboratory 
meetings of a course and to participate 
in all outside activities that are a part of 
the course. 

It is the responsibility of individual 
instructors to evaluate the importance 
of participation in determination of 
course grades. Students and faculty 
should demonstrate concern for each 
other in attendance matters. The Dean 
of Students grants excused absences in 
the event of serious, personal or family 
emergencies or authorized college 
events. 



48 



Withdrawal 

An honorable dismissal is granted to 
students in good standing who may 
desire to withdraw from the College if 
they have satisfied their advisor and a 
responsible officer of the College that 
there is a good reason to justify such 
action. Students asking to withdraw 
should present a written request to the 
Dean of Students along with a 
statement of approval from parent or 
guardian. The recommendation of the 
Dean of Students is next presented to 
the Business Manager and then to the 
Registrar for final record. No 
withdrawal is considered complete until 
this procedure has been carried out. 

Probation 

The term "on probation" is applied to 
students who are allowed to continue at 
Bethany after having failed to meet the 
standards expected by the faculty and 
administration. Students may be placed 
on probation for any of the following 
causes: 

1) Unsatisfactory scholastic record. The 
following academic basis will be used to 
determine probation each semester: 
Freshmen must achieve at least 1.7, 
Sophomores 1.8, and Juniors and 
Seniors 2.0. 

2) Unsatisfactory class attendance 
during the semester or preceding 
semester. 

3) Unsatisfactory conduct at any time. 

Probation is intended to be a warning to 
students (and to their parents or 
guardians) that their record is 
unsatisfactory and that unless 
significant improvement is made they 
will be asked to withdraw from the 
College. At the end of a semester on 
probation the student's total record is 
reviewed. Continued enrollment 
depends upon the trend of academic 
performance. The Policy Appeals Board 
may dismiss any student if the student 



is not likely to meet the requirements 
for graduation in the usual period of 
four years. An extension of the four- 
year period is granted only when there 
are extenuating circumstances. 

Special 
Examinations 

A student justifiably absent from a final 
examination or a test given in 
connection with regular class work is 
permitted to take a special test without 
payment of fees with the consent of the 
instructor and approval of the Dean of 
the Faculty. For any other examination 
a fee must be paid at the Business 
Office before the examination is taken, 
and the proper receipt must be 
presented to the instructor at the time 
of the examination. 

Transcript of 
Records 

Students wishing transcripts of records 
in order to transfer to other schools or 
for other purposes should make 
application to the Registrar's Office at 
least one week before the transcript is 
needed. Transcripts are issued only at 
the request of the student, and official 
transcripts are sent directly to the 
college or university specified by the 
student. One transcript is furnished to 
each student without charge; for each 
additional transcript a fee of $1.00 is 
charged. When three or more 
transcripts are ordered at the same 
time, the first transcript is $1.00, 
whereas the others cost $.50 each. Fees 
must accompany the request. All 
financial obligations to the College must 
be paid before a transcript is issued. 

Schedule of 
Course Offerings 

Most courses listed in departments are 
offered annually. However, many are 
offered every other year and a few are 
offered in three-year cycles. 

Students should see respective 
department heads for long-range course 
planning. 



Changes in 
Regulations 

Bethany reserves the right to amend 
the regulations covering the granting of 
degrees, the courses of study, and the 
conduct of students. Membership in 
Bethany College and the receiving of its 
degrees are privileges, not rights. The 
College reserves the right (and the 
student concedes to the College the 
right) to require the withdrawal of any 
student at any time. 

Invalidation of 
Credits 

Courses completed at Bethany or 
elsewhere, more than 10 calendar years 
before the date of proposed graduation, 
are not accepted for credit toward 
graduation. All candidates are expected 
to comply with degree requirements in 
effect at the time of acceptance of the 
degree application. With the approval 
of the Policy Appeals Board and the 
payment of the required fee, the 
candidate may take examinations, as 
administered by the various 
departments, for courses included in 
the current curriculum, to reinstate 
academic credit that may have been 
declared invalid because of date. 

Policy Appeals 
Board 

The faculty memebers who sit on the 
Policy Appeals Board evaluate student 
requests for exceptions to regular 
academic policies and regulations. 
Student requests are submitted in 
writing and should include the advisor's 
recommendation . 



49 



Courses Index 

Freshman Studies 51 

Art 53 

Astronomy 55 

Biology 56 

Chemistry 58 

Communications 60 

Computer Science 63 

Economics and Business 65 

Education 68 

English 76 

Fine Arts 81 

Foreign Languages 83 

General Sciences 87 

Geography 87 

Health Science 88 

Heuristics 88 

History and Political Science 89 

Interdisciplinary Studies 93 

Library 94 

Mathematics 95 

Music 97 

Philosophy 101 

Physical Education 103 

Physics 108 

Psychology 111 

Religious Studies 114 

Social Sciences 117 

Sociology and Social Work 118 

Theatre 121 







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50 




Course 
Descriptions 

Freshman Studies 

Interdisciplinary Lecture 100 4 hours 

Sec. 1. One Nation Under Sports 

This interdisciplinary course studies sports 
and athletics as they relate to society. The 
varied motivations of participants and 
spectators, the multiplication of super- 
wealth and super-heroes, the role of mass 
media, the lack of government restriction 
and the future directions of sports and 
athletics will be subjects of this study. Using 
interdisciplinary and multi-media 
approaches, this course looks at the impact 
of sports on American economy, social 
structures, education, politics and religion. 
(James E. Allison, Associate Professor of 
Mathematics) 

Sec. 2. Our Sexuality 

We will explore psychological, biological 
sociological, and religious aspects of human 
sexuality and gender-role development. 
Some of the topics to be covered are: sexual 
anatomy and physiology; sexual myths and 
fallacies; contraception; gender-role 
stereotyping; cross-cultural sexual behavior; 
sexuality and the Bible; sex therapy. 
(John H. Hull, Assistant Professor of 
Psychology) 



Sec. 3. Bug-Eyed-Beings and Other 
Critters of Inner and Outer Space: 
Exploring the Intersection of Science 
Fiction and Philosophy 

An examination of the major themes in 
selected science fiction short stories, novels 
and films, and the relation these thematic 
expressions bear to the philosophic 
"mindscape" of historic eras. Specific 
concern focuses on the dominant philosophic- 
presuppositions, conceptual frames and 
value commitments, especially as these 
relate to science and technology, the self and 
others, the inner and outer worlds, social 
and political conditions and ideals, religious 
and psychological beliefs and faiths, and the 
hopes and fears about the known and the 
unknown. Fee $15. (Robert E. Myers, 
Professor of Philosophy) 

Freshman Seminar III 4 hours 

Sec. A Hatfields and McCoys: 
Appalachian Myths, Legend, and Reality 

This seminar represents a humanistic and 
social scientific venture in regional- 
community study. It takes advantage of 
West Virginia's unique position as a 
laboratory for such inquiry. It explores such 
factors as ethnic patterns and diversities, 
struggles for modernization, demographic 
trends, and socio-cultural attitudes. Students 
will explore the myths, legends and realities 
of Appalachia through selected Appalachian 
literature, films, field trips and crafts 
activities. (Lynn Adkins, Associate Professor 
of Sociology and Social Work) 

Sec. B Rumor of Angels: A Study of 
Miracles 

The seminar will undertake a study of the 
concept of miracles and cases of miraculous 
events in the lives of people. There will be a 
particular emphasis on cases of spiritual 
healing and follow-up investigations of these 
cases. Though no definitive conclusions will 
probably be reached by the group there 
should be a great deal of clarification for 
each individual as to the place the concept of 
the miraculous holds in his/her worldview. 
(William B. Allen, College Chaplain) 

Sec. C Personal Life and Human Survival 
in the Nuclear Age 

Students will develop an understanding of 
the threat and dangers of nuclear war. The 
facts of Hiroshima and the Nazi Holocaust 
will provide background information. 
Through readings, films and discussion 
students will clarify their own personal and 
political response. (Leonora Balla Cayard, 
Associate Professor of Foreign Languages) 




Sec. D Medical Practice in Ancient and 
Modern Times 

A consideration of the history of medical 
practice from the time of the medicine man 
through folk medicine and early scientific 
discoveries, to modern medicine and 
surgery. Time will be devoted to the 
biographical study of certain physicians as 
well as to current problems of health care 
for all citizens. (J. Daniel Draper, Professor 
of Chemistry) 

Sec. E The Soaps: Reality Therapy or 
Fantasy Trip 

This course will study the modern day soap 
opera as a means of gaining insight into 
reflections of our social attitudes, values, life 
styles and cultural development as a society. 
Students will explore several selected soap 
operas analyzing the settings, character 
portrayals and communication dialogues. 
Comparison will be drawn between day and 
night-time programming and audience 
selection. Assessment skills will be taught 
from a humanistic perspective in order to 
evaluate program validity. (Paul E. Diss Jr., 
Assistant Professor of Sociology and Social 
Work) 



51 




Sec. F The Television Generation 

This seminar will explore the impact that 
television has on the individual and on 
society. Areas to be examined include 
advertising, race and sex stereotypes, 
television as a narcotic, and television's 
increasing role in education. Students will be 
introduced to techniques of production and 
to television equipment and will write, 
perform and produce an original television 
show as a culmination of the seminar. (Jay 
Start, Instructor of Educational Media) 



Sec. G The Estranged God 

Students will examine selected works of 
literature and philosophy, as well as view 
modern films, in an effort to come to grips 
with problems of belief and unbelief. The 
intent of the course is to provide students 
with an opportunity to deal with the tension 
between belief and unbelief in their own 
lives as they wrestle with works by Camus, 
Sartre, Salinger, Golding, and others. 
(Lewis F. Gaeta.no, College Chaplain) 

Sec. H Crime and Its Detection 

A study of crime fiction and film from Conan 
Doyle to the present. Emphasis on crime 
fiction as intellectual puzzle, social 
commentary, and metaphor for the age. 
Students will examine works by Doyle, 
Sayer, Puzo, Hammett, John D. MacDonald 
and others. They will also engage in 
simulation games and a mock trial. 
(Larry E. Grimes, Associate Professor of 
English) 

Sec. I The Human Struggle through Sport 

This seminar explores through the medium 
of sport literature the impact of sport on 
society and self. In it, students will examine 
the social and psychological effects on 
participants and consumers of sport through 
study of fiction, essays and poetry having a 
sport motif. Topics include racism, sexism, 
love, death, age and winning. (David M. 
Hutter, Professor of Physical Education) 

Sec. J Adapting Fiction for Stage and 
TV Production 

Students will read short American Southern 
fiction for the purpose of adapting the works 
to serve as play or TV scripts to be 
performed in live or taped productions. The 
course emphasizes sound reading, effective 
script writing, and inventive production 
responsibilities, i.e, directing, and/or 
performing, designing or producing. 
(David J. Judy, Associate Professor of 
English and Theatre) 

Sec. K Survival: The Will to Live 

An inquiry into the nature of human 
behavior under conditions of extreme stress. 
Settings where physical survival depends on 
an individual's skills, imagination, and 
determination include escapes, shipwrecks, 
and concentration camps. The seminar will 
also examine the growing number of 
individuals and groups known as survivalists 
who advocate self-sufficiency as a response 
to the anticipated collapse of social 
institutions and civil authority. (Marc A. 
Olshan, Assistant Professor of Sociology and 
Social Work) 



Sec. L The Computer: Fact and Fiction 

This seminar seeks to introduce students to 
computers and computing and to examine 
some of the implications of computers for 
human culture and thought. In pursuit of 
these goals seminar members will learn 
elementary programming, will learn to use 
computerized text editing, and will publish a 
weekly, computerized newspaper for 
freshmen - Fresh News, while readings will 
range from technical articles to science 
fiction. (J. Trevor Peirce, Professor of 
Psychology) 

Sec. M. Human Values Through Human 
Drama 

A principal objective of this course is to 
teach the student how to read a play as a 
work intended for staging. Even though we 
have a text of ink and paper, to fully 
appreciate the conversion of dramatic 
literature into theatre, we must stage the 
text in that theatre we all carry around with 
us - the mind. (Paul Christopher Smith, 
Associate Professor of Foreign Languages) 

Sec. Education of the Self 

Exploration of three areas considered 
crucial to personal adjustment and growth: 
the self-concept, relationships and 
communication, and a meaningful philosophy 
of life. Through readings and group 
discussions, it is hoped that students will 
leave the seminar with a greater 
understanding and acceptance of self and 
others. (T. Gale Thompson, Associate 
Professor of Psychology) 



52 




Art 



Aims 

To provide a balanced background for 
students who wish to pursue advanced 
study and/or a career in art or graphic 
design; to prepare students for teaching 
or supervising art on either the 
elementary or secondary level; to 
combine art with other academic 
studies as a broad basis for liberal 
education on the college level; and to 
provide an atmosphere in which the 
student is encouraged to acquire 
standards for the evaluation, practice 
and appreciation, and application of the 
plastic arts. 

Requirements for Field 
of Concentration 

The minimum requirement for a major 
in art is 40 semester hours, including 
Art 200, four hours of drawing, two 
hours of painting, Art 201, Junior 
Seminar, and Senior Project. At least 10 
credit hours must be in art history 
courses. Departmental meetings, 
approximately two per year, are 
required of all majors, and each student 
must participate in at least one 
departmental-sponsored museum tour 
of Washington, D.C., prior to the senior 
year. Prerequisites must be observed 
unless the student can show evidence of 
equivalent training or experience. 

The Art Department reserves the right 
to retain permanently one work from 
each student in each class. Other works 
may be held temporarily for use in 
specific exhibitions and will be available 
to owners no later than one year after 
the lending date. 



53 



Only students who have completed the 
following courses or their equivalents 
will be recommended for state 
certification to teach Art: Art 105, 200, 
201, 205, 206, 210, 300, 301, 320, 325, 
478, 480, 490, 10 hours of Art History 
and eight hours in studio emphasis. See 
Education Department listings for 
required professional education courses. 

Art 105 Art Encounter 4 hours 
The exploration of the basic theories and 
techniques of major periods in art-history 
through practice and experimentation. 

Art 110 Creative Sources 4 hours 
Creative Sources: Exploration of art 
fundamentals, concepts, and procedures 
through the creative experimentation with 
materials and techniques. Emphasis on the 
"art of seeing," symbolic inference and 
alternative approaches to problem solving. 

Art 200 Introduction to Two-Dimensional 
Design 4 hours 

Basic course work in the theories and 
practice of two dimensional design; study of 
the elements and materials in relation to 
design potentials with practical applications. 
Prerequisite for all art majors. 

Art 201 Introduction to 
Three-Dimensional Design 2 hours 
Basic course work in theories and practice of 
three-dimensional design; study of the 
elements and materials in relation to design 
potentials with practical application. 

Art 205 Still Life and Landscape 
Drawing 2 hours 

Concentrated activity in drawing using a 
variety of drawing media. Primary emphasis 
is placed on still life and landscape. 

Art 206 Figure and Portraiture Drawing 

2 hours 

Concentrated activity in drawing using a 
variety of drawing media. Primary emphasis 
is placed on figure drawing and portraiture. 

Art 210 Ceramics 1 2 hours 

Studio experience in forming, firing, and 

glazing pottery, including ceramic sculpture. 

Individual projects according to student's 

ability. 



54 



Art 300 Watercolor Painting 2 hours 
Creative exploration of the techniques of 
watercolor and acrylics, using still life, 
landscape, portraiture, and imaginative 
subject matter in a variety of styles. 

Art 301 Oil Painting 2 hours 
Creative exploration of the techniques of oil 
paints and compatible media, using still life, 
landscape, portraiture, and imaginative 
subject matter in a variety of styles. 

Art 305 Advanced Still Life and 
Landscape Drawing 2 hours 
Advanced problems in drawing with a 
concentration in a specific area, including 
still life, landscape, and imaginary drawing. 
Emphasis on composition. Prerequisite: Art 
205. 

Art 306 Advanced Figure and 
Portraiture Drawing 2 hours 
Advanced problems in drawing with a 
concentration in a specific area, including 
figure drawing and portraiture. 
Prerequisite: Art 206. 

Art 310 Ceramics 2 2 hours 
Advanced problems in media and subject 
matter selected by the student with the 
advice of the instructor. Prerequisite: Art 
210. 

Art 320 Sculpture 1 2 hours 
Creative expression in three-dimensional 
forms. Students work with materials that 
are readily available and easily handled, such 
as wood, wire, plaster, and clay. 
Prerequisite: Art 201 or permission of the 
instructor. 

Art 325 Printmaking 1 4 hours 
Introduction to printmaking processes 
emphasizing creative expression through 
such techniques as relief, intaglio, 
planographic, serigraphy. Prerequisite: Art 
205 or permission of the instructor. 

Art 340 Art Activities in the 
Elementary School 4 hours 
Study of the theories and goals of art 
education in the elementary school with 
emphasis on the child's growth and 
development through art. Exploration of art 
techniques is included. 

Art 400 Advanced Watercolor Painting 

2 hours 

Advanced exploration of the aqueous media 
with an individual choice of subject matter 
and style. Prerequisite: Art 300. 

Art 401 Advanced Oil Painting 2 hours 
Advanced exploration in oils and compatible 
media with an individual choice of subject 
matter and style. Prerequisite: Art 301. 




Art 420 Sculpture 2 2 hours 
Advanced problems in media and subject 
matter selected by the student with the 
advice of the instructor. Prerequisite: 
Art 320. 

Art 425 Printmaking 2 4 hours 
Advanced problems in media and subject 
matter selected by the student with the 
advice of the instructor. 
Prerequisite: Art 325. 

Art 478 Junior Seminar 2 hours 
Required of all students concentrating in the 
field. A survey of art for review and 
interpretation of the particular problems of 
this field. 

Art 480 Methods and Materials in 

Art 4 hours 

Problems in the teaching and administration 
of art programs. (May be taken for credit as 
Education 480.) 

Art 487-488 Independent Study 

2 or 4 hours each 

Art 490 Senior Project 2-8 hours 
Begins during the second semester of the 
junior year. 



Graphic Design 

The following courses provide students 
interested in communications, graphics, and 
advertising with background pertinent to 
the field. An interdepartmental program can 
be developed between the Art Department 
and the Communications Department. See 
the respective department heads for 
requirements. 

Art 302 Airbrush Techniques 2 hours 
Beginning through advanced airbrush 
techniques. Exploration of various uses - 
graphic design, photo retouching, ceramics 
and painting. 

Art 303 Lettering and Layout 4 hours 
Introduction to calligraphy, typography, 
letter forms, and layout, with emphasis on 
design, legibility, and creative practice. 

Art 304 Design Applications 4 hours 
Emphasis on problem solving experiences as 
related to visual communications. The 
mechanics and psychology of two- 
dimensional and three-dimensional design 
are explored as a foundation for graphic 
design. 

Art 404 Television Graphics 4 hours 
Emphasis on the design of visual symbols for 
television. Combines principles of graphic 
art with the particular requirements of 
television production. Art 303 and 304 
recommended but not required. 

Art 405 Illustration 4 hours 
Advanced problems in advertising, book, 
and magazine illustration, with emphasis on 
procedures necessary to pictorial expression 
of ideas. Art 200 and 205 recommended but 
not required. 

Art 406 Graphic Communications Design 
Studio 4 hours 

Emphasis on professional procedures, 
structure, communication functions, and 
processes as applied to areas of graphic 
design in practical applications. 
Prerequisites: Art 303, 30k, k05 or 
permission of the instructor. 



Art History 

The following courses are surveys, intended 
to introduce students to a variety of artistic 
achievements, and the work of selected 
artists, their methods, media, and 
contributions, in the context of their time. 
The continuity of artistic development is 
stressed. 

Art 351 The Ancient World 2 hours 
Beginning with an introduction to Paleolithic 
Art, this course concentrates on the art of 
the Ancient Near East, Egypt, Classic 
Greece and Rome. 

Art 352 The Middle Ages 2 hours 
Survey of Early Christian and Byzantine 
art, the architectural achievements of the 
Middle Ages, and the advanced painting 
styles of the Italian and Northern 
Renaissance. 

Art 353 Renaissance 2 hours 
Survey of the Early Renaissance in Italy and 
Northern Europe; the High Renaissance in 
Florence, Rome, Venice and Northern Italy; 
Mannerism; the High and Late Renaissance 
outside Italy. 

Art 354 Baroque 2 hours 
Survey of the Baroque style in Italy, France, 
and England including the study of Flemish, 
Dutch and Spanish painting. 

Art 355 Late 18th and 19th Century 

2 hours 

Survey of Neoclassicism, Romanticism, the 
English landscape school, Realism, 
Impressionism, Post-Impressionism, and Art 
Nouveau. Painting, sculpture and 
architecture are treated. 

Art 356 20th Century 2 hours 
Survey of 20th Century movements in 
American art and elsewhere. 

Art 357 U.S. Art 2 hours 
Survey of the development of the arts in the 
U.S. from Colonial times to the present with 
emphasis on the evolution of style in 
architecture, sculpture and painting. 

Art 358 Asian Art History 2 hours 
Introduction to the arts of China, Japan and 
India with some reference to Islamic art. 




Astronomy 



(See General Science 201 Astronomy) 



55 



Biology 



Aims 

To acquaint students with the living 
world around them and with basic life 
processes; to demonstrate the scientific 
method as an approach to problem 
solving; to cultivate an appreciation of 
research; to develop laboratory skill in 
various types of work in biology; to 
prepare students as teachers of biology 
and for professional fields such as 
medicine, dentistry, veterinary 
medicine, and for graduate schools in 
various biologic disciplines; and to help 
students find and appreciate their role 
in the natural environment. 

Requirements for Field 
of Concentration 

A minimum of 40 semester hours in the 
department including the Senior 
Project. A minimum of 16 semester 
hours in chemistry, including two 
semesters of organic chemistry. Eight 
hours of physics are also required. 
German or French is recommended for 
those students preparing for graduate 
school. A semester of calculus is also 
strongly recommended. Statistics is 
recommended for students preparing 
for graduate work in ecology, wildlife 
biology, genetics and certain other 
fields. 

Biology majors must complete Bio. 100, 
Bio. 180, Bio. 280, Bio. 290, and Bio. 
308. In addition each major must chose 
4 semester hours from each of the 
following three groups: 
Bio. 343, Bio. 425, Bio. 467; 
Bio. 228, Bio. 231, Bio. 326; 
Bio. 440, Bio. 442 



56 



Requirements for Biology 
as a Second Teaching Field 

Only students who have completed the 
following courses or their equivalents 
will be recommended for state 
certification to teach biology in the 
secondary schools: Bio. 100, Bio. 280, 
Bio. 167 or Bio. 308, Bio. 210, Bio. 290, 
Bio. 326 or (Bio. 228 and Bio. 231), 
Chem. 101, Chem. 102, G.S. 480. See 
Education Department listings for 
required professional education courses. 
Biology majors seeking certification 
must complete the requirements listed 
above for biology as a field of 
concentration as well. A second 
teaching field is required. G.S. 480 is 
required for state teacher's certification 
in biology even if the student has taken 
Ed. 480 in humanities or social science. 

Bio. 100 Fundamentals of Biology 

4 hours 

An introduction to modern concepts of cell 
biology, metabolism, photosynthesis, 
nutrition, reproduction, heredity, evolution, 
behavior, and ecology, emphasizing the 
process of acquiring biological knowledge. 
Consideration is given to social and ethical 
implications of biological issues. 

Bio. 102 Horticultural Science 2 hours 
Examination of the scientific concepts on 
which horticulture is based. Emphasis is 
placed on the study of the plant, the basis of 
all horticultural activities. 

Bio. 105 First Aid as Related to the 
Principles of Biology 2 hours 
Major emphasis is placed on the biological 
principles utilized in the standard first aid 
and personal safety course of the American 
Red Cross. Red Cross certificates may be 
earned by those passing the examination. 
Opportunity for instructors' certificates will 
be presented as an option at the end of the 
course. Does not fulfill distribution 
requirements in the physical and life 
sciences. (May be taken for credit as 
Physical Education 226.) 

Bio. 167 Introduction to Mammalian 
Anatomy and Physiology 4 hours 
Mammalian anatomy as exemplified in the 
cat. Discussion and study of the functioning 
of the tissues and organ systems of the 
human body, lab study of the anatomy of the 
cat, the human physiology. Not open to 
biology majors. Prerequisite: Bio. 100. May 
be taken for credit as P.E. 167. 



Biol 180 Invertebrate Zoology 4 hours 
A structural, functional and evolutionary 
study of the major invertebrate phyla. 

Bio. 205 Emergency Medical Training 

4 hours 

The medical, communication, transportation 
records, and report instructions required for 
certification by the West Virginia 
Department of Health as an emergency 
medical technician. Red Cross advanced first 
aid certificates may be earned by those 
passing the examination. Does not fulfill 
distribution requirements in the physical and 
life sciences. 

Bio. 210 Evolution 2 hours 
Evidence for the theories of evolution with 
special attention to the modern synthesis of 
genetic and ecological factors. Prerequisite: 
An elementary course in biology or 
permission of the instructor. 

Bio. 228 Field Botany 2 hours 
Introduction to the taxonomy of vascular 
plants with emphasis on the local flora, 
including the techniques of herbarium 
science. 

Bio. 231 Ornithology 2 hours 
Anatomy, behavior, and identification of 
birds. 

Bio. 270 Nutrition 4 hours 
An examination of nutrients, metabolic 
pathways, integrated functions, and 
nutritional requirements that are necessary 
to maintain life. These basic principles will 
then be used to examine nutritional issues. 

Bio. 280 Biology 4 hours 
A study of plant life including the evolution 
of the various groups of plants, the 
morphology and anatomy of vascular plants, 
and the fundamental life processes of plants. 

Bio. 290 General Genetics 4 hours 
A synthesis of basic principles and modern 
molecular theory. 

Bio. 308 Comparative Vertebrate 
Anatomy 4 hours 

Comparative anatomy of the representative 
forms of vertebrates; lab study of the 
comparative anatomy of the shark, other 
lower vertebrates, and the cat. 




Bio. 326 Ecology 4 hours 
Study of the general principles of ecology of 
microorganisms, plants and animals. Special 
emphasis is placed on field study of several 
communities. Prerequisite: Bio. 100 and 
Bio. 101 or permission of the instructor. 

Bio. 343 Microbiology 4 hours 
Morphology and physiology of micro- 
organisms; principles of lab technique; 
cultural characteristics and environment 
influences on microbial growth. 

Bio. 425 Animal Physiology 4 hours 
Structure and functions of the human body; 
the mechanism of bodily movements, 
responses, reactions, and various 
physiological states. 

Bio. 440 Histology-Microtechniques 

4 hours 

Structure of the cell, its modification into 
various tissues, and the practice of general 
histological techniques. 

Bio. 442 Embryology 4 hours 
Study of the ontogenetic development of 
selected embryos. Major emphasis is on the 
vertebrates. 

Bio. 467 Cell Physiology and 
Biochemistry 4 hours 
Introduction to the structural organization 
of cells and the important aspects of cell 
physiology in the light of modern 
biochemistry and biophysics. Prerequisite: 
Chem. 211-212 or permission of the 
instructor. 

Bio. 480 Methods and Materials in 
Teaching Physical and Life Sciences 

4 hours 

For course description see General Science 

480. (May be taken for credit as Education 

480.) 



Bio. 487-488 
hours each 



Independent Study 2 or 4 



Bio. 490 Senior Project 4-8 hours 
Starts the first semester of the junior year 
and is to be completed in the spring 
semester of the senior year. 



57 



Chemistry 



Aims 

To contribute to the student's general 
knowledge and understanding of the 
nature of the physical world and his or 
her understanding of the place of 
chemistry in industrial and business 
life; to provide experience in the 
scientific method of reasoning; and to 
provide students concentrating in this 
field with a thorough and practical 
education in chemistry which may be 
useful in industrial, technical, and 
graduate work. 

Requirements for Field 
of Concentration 

A minimum of 36 hours in the 
department exclusive of the Senior 
Project. The distribution must include 
Chemistry 101, 102, 211, 212, 222, 224, 
323, 324, 402, 414, 421 plus four hours 
of electives and at least four hours of 
Senior Project; Mathematics 201, 202; 
Physics 201, 202; and at least two hours 
from the group of Computer Science 
140, 142, Physics 221, 261, 300, 
Mathematics 203, 341. Students who 
plan to do graduate work in chemistry 



will demonstrate a reading knowledge 
of chemical German, French, or 
Russian. Additional courses in 
mathematics are also strongly 
recommended. All course in chemistry 
as well as the indicated courses in 
mathematics and physics must be taken 
for a letter grade. For those students 
for whom it might be advantageous, a 
program of study is offered consistent 
with the most recent standards laid 
down by the American Chemical 
Society. 

The entering freshman who is 
interested in chemistry should select 
Chemistry 101 and mathematics at the 
appropriate level. Programs for 
subsequent semesters must be decided 
in conference with the faculty advisors 
for chemistry. Students planning to 
take the MCAT are strongly advised to 
take a course in the history of the fine 
arts during their fourth or fifth 
semesters. 

Only students who have completed the 
following courses or their equivalents 
will be recommended for state 
certification to teach Chemistry in 
secondary school: Chem. 101, 102, 211, 
212, 222, Physics 201, 202, G.S. 480, 
and select six hours from the following: 
Chem. 224, 314, 323, 402, 414. See 
Education Department listings for 
required courses in Professional 
Education. A second teaching field is 
required. 



Chem. 100 Consumer Chemistry 

(See General Science 100.) 



4 hours 



58 



Chem. 101 General Chemistry and 
Inorganic Qualitative Analysis 4 hours 
Study of theoretical and descriptive 
inorganic chemistry. The lab work is 
primarily a study of the principles and 
practice of a systematic qualitative scheme 
of analysis for the cations and anions. 
Prerequisites: two units of mathematics or 
concurrently with Math. 103. Three lectures 
and three hours of lab per week. 

Chem. 102 General Chemistry 4 hours 
Continuation of the lecture portion of Chem. 
101. Study of solubility and acid-base 
phenomena in aqueous systems with 
appropriate lab work. Prerequisite: Chem. 
101. 



Chem. 211-212 Organic Chemistry 

4 hours each 

Introduction to the study of the organic 
compounds of carbon, both aliphatic and 
aromatic, involving a considerable amount of 
the electronic mechanisms of organic 
reactions. Lab work consists largely of 
organic preparations. Prerequisites: Chem. 
101, 102. Three lectures and three hours of lab 
per week. 

Chem. 222 Chemical Thermodynamics 

2 hours 

Introduction to the concepts and 
experimental techniques of classical 
thermodynamics with special emphasis on 
the concepts of enthalpy, entropy, and free 
energy. Prerequisites: Chem. 102; Math. 202 
or permission of the instructor. 

Chem. 224 Introduction to Chemical 
Spectroscopy 2 hours 
Study of the different energy states of 
atoms and molecules; the statistical 
principles governing the distribution of 
particles within these states; and the 
transitions between states. Prerequisites: 
Chem. 102; Math. 202 or permission of the 
instructor. 

Chem. 311 Bonding and Symmetry in 
Organic Chemistry 2 hours 
Introduction to group theory and simple 
molecular orbital calculations as they apply 
to organic chemistry and to the spectra of 
organic compounds. Emphasis is placed on 
problem solving and structural 
determinations from spectroscopic data. 
Prerequisites: Chem. 212; Chem. 22U or 
permission of the instructor. 



Chem. 314 Introduction to Biochemistry 

2 hours 

Study of the chemistry of some of the more 
important biological processes with 
emphasis on reaction mechanisms and 
methods of elucidation. Prerequisite: 
Chem. 212. 

Chem. 323 Kinetics and Solutions 

2 hours 

Study of rate processes, especially in the 

liquid phase. Prerequisite: Chem. 222. 

Chem. 324 Electrochemistry 4 hours 
Study of oxidation-reduction and phenomena 
associated with solutions of electrolytes, 
application of these principles including 
classical electrochemical analysis, and the 
measurement of basic physical parameters. 
Prerequisite: Chem. 222. 

Chem. 325 Chemical Instrumentation 

2 hours 

The theory and practice of selected methods 
in chemical instrumentation. Special 
emphasis will be placed on those methods 
not covered in other courses and on methods 
helpful for completion of Senior Projects. 
Prerequisites: Chem. 222, Chem. 22k. 

Chem. 402 Advanced Inorganic 
Chemistry 2 hours 
Chemistry of certain elements and their 
compounds is studied and interpreted on the 
basis of modern theories of atomic and 
molecular structure. The necessary 
foundation in quantum mechanics is 
reviewed. Prerequisites: Chem. 222, 221+. 



Chem. 411 Physical Organic Chemistry 

2 hours 

Study of the theories and techniques 
relating structure and properties of organic 
compounds. Prerequisites: Chem. 212; Chem. 
222 or permission of the instructor. 

Chem. 414 Advanced Organic Chemistry 

2 hours 

Study of selected advanced topics in organic 
chemistry including reaction mechanisms. 
Lab is introduced, where appropriate, and 
stresses the use of instrumentation. 
Prerequisites: Chem. 212; Chem. 222 or 
permission of the instructor. 

Chem. 421 Chemistry of the Condensed 
Phases 2 hours 

Study of special problems associated with 
the liquid and solid states. Prerequisite: 
Chem. 222. 

Chem. 430 Special Topics 2 hours each 
Series of three courses devoted to the 
consideration of advanced topics and areas 
of special interest in the fields of Inorganic 
Chemistry (430- A), Organic Chemistry 
(430-B), and Physical Chemistry (430-C). 
Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 

Chem. 477-478 Seminar in Chemistry 

2 hours 

Presentation of current research topics by 

students, faculty and visiting lecturers. 

Chem. 480 Methods and Materials in 

Teaching Physical & Life 

Sciences 4 hours 

For course description see General Science 

480. (May be taken for credit as Education 

480.) 






Chem. 487-488 
4 hours each 



Independent Study 



or 



Chem. 490 Senior Project 4-8 hours 
During the junior year the chemistry major 
is introduced to the methods of employing 
the chemical literature, selects a topic for 
advanced investigation, and makes a 
literature search of background material as 
a basis for an in-depth study in this area. 
There is one class meeting each week for 
both semesters. Following this preliminary 
work, an investigation of a significant topic 
in chemistry is made by each senior under 
the direction of a faculty member in the 
department. This work culminates in a 
written and oral report at the end of the 
senior year. Fee: $20. 



W:T*f •"'*<' -. 




59 




Communications 



Aims 

To prepare students for careers in the 
fields of advertising, magazines, 
newspapers, public relations, radio and 
television by developing the skills 
necessary for professional-level 
performance; to help students analyze 
and understand all forms of written and 
oral communications directed toward a 
variety of audiences; to instill a sense of 
ethical and legal responsibility among 
future professional communicators. 



60 



Requirements for Field 
of Concentration 

Communications 101, 201, 206, 304, 403; 
either 204 and 303, or 288, 378, 310; 
one of the following: 207, 350 or 402; 
either 301 or 302. 

In addition, students will complete a 
Senior Project; work for at least one 
semester on a campus publication, 
Cable 3 or WVBC-FM; complete a 
department-approved internship in the 
mass media, advertising or public 
relations; take 12 hours in English 
courses and/or foreign language 



literature courses; and achieve a 
proficiency in reading a foreign 
language at the 200 level. 

Normally students take 101 and 206 as 
freshmen. Appropriate courses outside 
of the department, including helpful 
Core programs, can be recommended 
by advisors in the Communications 
Department. 



Students seeking careers in 
Commercial Art or Television Graphics 
may take advantage of the 
interdepartmental program developed 
between the Communications 
Department and the Art Department. 
See the respective department heads 
for requirements. 

Students must have achieved at least 
sophomore standing for enrollment in 
any of the 300- and kOO-level courses in 
the department. 

Comm. 101 Introduction to Mass 

Communications 4 hours 

History and theory of mass communications. 

Role of newspapers, magazines, radio, 

television, books, movies, and adjunct 

agencies in modern society. Effects on 

audiences. 

Comm. 201 Beginning Reporting 

4 hours 

Study and practice of basic journalistic 
writing skills, including grammar and 
sentence construction as they relate to news 
writing. Basic reporting skills will be 
emphasized. In addition to both in-class and 
out-of-class writing assignments, students 
will be required to write for the campus 
newspaper. Prerequisite: Passing 
journalism section of WQT. 

Comm. 204 Copy Editing and 

Layout 4 hours 

Principles and practice in editing copy for 

publications; includes typography, layout, 

design of letterpress and offset newspapers, 

and use of computers. Prerequisite: Comm. 

201. 



Comm. 206 Interpersonal 
Communication: Public Speaking 4 hours 
Introduction to the dynamics of 
communication: levels of interaction 
between speaker and listener. Developing 
the use of voice and non-verbal signals; 
understanding oral style in language and 
logical argument in public speaking. Focus 
on the design and delivery of short speeches 
and on critical listening. (May be taken for 
credit as Theatre 206.) 

Comm. 207 Theory of Interpersonal 
Communication 4 hours 
Introduction to verbal and nonverbal 
interaction in dyads and small groups. 
Examination of perception, self-concept, 
awareness, use of language, listening and 
feedback as they affect oral communication. 
Practice and analysis of interpersonal skills. 

Comm. 220-J Caribbean Journalism 

2 hours 

Study of the mass media and their impact 
economically, socially, politically, religiously, 
and educationally on the various Caribbean 
groups. The course deals with the media in 
the Virgin Islands, Puerto Rico, Cuba, Haiti, 
Dominican Republic, and the Caribbean 
Commonwealth nations. January term only. 

Comm. 281 TV Programming 2 hours 
Historical development. Current trends and 
practices, program designs, and audience 
analysis. 

Comm. 288 TV Production 2 hours 
Lecture/lab designed to acquaint students 
with the tools, elements and techniques of 
TV production. Students serve as floor 
managers, camera operators, audio/visual 
technicians and directors. 

Comm. 295 Publication Photography 

4 hours 

Introduction to the knowledge, skills, and 
techniques needed to produce quality black- 
and-white photographs for publication. 
Course covers both visual communication 
techniques and basic design and aesthetic 
concepts. Emphasis is on learning to meet 
specific newspaper and other publications' 
photograhpic requirements effectively. Two 
lectures and one four-hour lab per week. 
Prerequisite: Comm. 201 and junior 
standing. 

Comm. 301 Principles of Advertising 

4 hours 

Study of history, philosophies and principles 

of advertising. Media, markets and 

merchandising. Role and evaluation of 

advertising. Stress on copy writing and 

layout. 



Comm. 302 Principles of Public 
Relations 4 hours 
Contributions and criticisms of public- 
relations. History, philosophies, trends, 
principles, Case studies of institutional 
programs. Preparation of a creative project 
such as a trade journal. 

Comm. 303 Advanced Reporting 

2 hours 

Emphasis on in-depth news reporting. 
Attention to public affairs reporting. 
Feature writing, as it relates to magazines, 
will be studied. Students will write for 
campus media. Prerequisite: Comm. 201. 

Comm. 304 Laws of Mass 
Communications 4 hours 
Treatment of national and state 
constitutional and legislative laws and court 
decisions regarding freedom and 
responsibility of the print and electronic 
media, advertising and public relations. 
Principles and case studies of libel, privacy, 
privilege, copyright, and contempt. Social 
responsibility of the media. 

Comm. 306 American Magazines 2 hours 
Role and contributions of U.S. magazines, 
historically and currently. Trends in writing 
style, editing, production, layout, 
advertising, promotion, reader research, and 
circulation. Practice in writing three articles 
for a professional journal and general 
circulation magazines. 

Comm. 307 Interpersonal 
Communication: Oral 
Interpretation 2 hours 
Development of voice and nonverbal skills to 
interpret prose, poetry and dramatic 
literature in oral presentation. Techniques 
for platform and microphone. Projects will 
demonstrate facility in transmitting 
meaning for public performance. (May be 
taken for credit as Theatre 307.) 



61 



Comm. 310 Advanced Broadcast News 
Reporting 2 hours 

A lecture-laboratory course dealing with the 
complexities of the electronic news 
gathering process. Emphasis on the use of 
state-of-the-art technology and its affects on 
news content and story organization. Field 
trips to local stations and guest speakers 
from the media. Students will be required to 
gather and report news using the technology 
associated with radio, television and cable. 
Prerequisite: Comm. 201. 

Comm. 335 School Publications 2 hours 
Practical course in which class members do 
reporting, editing, and layout work. 
Editorial and design problems of high 
school, college yearbooks, catalogs, and 
literary journals are also considered with 
school periodicals as examination pieces. 

Comm. 350 Persuasion 4 hours 
Concentrated study of persuasion theory. 
Topics include; learning theory, consistency 
theories, social judgment theory, motivation, 
the enthymeme, counterattitudinal 
advocacy, role-playing and inducing 
resistance to persuasion. Prerequisite 
Comm. 206. 

Comm. 355 Advanced Public Speaking 

4 hours 

Focuses on specific types of speeches and 
rhetorical situations. Special emphasis is 
given to speechwriting and to the actual 
delivery settings for these speeches. 
Speeches include: introduction, nomination 
and acceptance, eulogy, after-dinner, 
impromptu, question response, sales 
presentation, reports, etc. Prerequisite: 
Comm. 206. 



Comm. 365 Audio-Visual Education 

2 hours 

(See Education 365.) 

Comm. 366 Educational and Public 
Broadcasting-I 2 hours 
Survey of the development and current 
trends in noncommercial radio and 
television. Emphasis is placed on the 
Carnegie Commission, legislative action, 
structure, funding, programming, and 
regulation. Lecture, discussion, field trips. 

Comm. 367 Educational and Public 
Broadcasting-II (Continuation of Comm. 

366) 2 hours 

Additional emphasis on instructional TV and 
international systems in industrialized 
countries and Third World countries. 
Students will be required to do in-depth 
historical research over an area or trend 
covered in Part I and II. Research, 
discussion, lecture, field trips. 

Comm. 377 The Performing Arts in 
Radio and TV 2 hours 
Studio course utilizing specific exercises 
designed to develop individual style in 
camera and microphone techniques. Useful 
to all students of the performing arts as well 
as those desiring a career in radio and/or TV 
announcing, acting, and singing. 

Comm. 378 Audio Production 2 hours 
Lecture and lab course designed to acquaint 
the student with basic techniques of audio 
production. The course employs both 
classroom discussions and practical projects 
in the WVBC radio studios. Emphasis is on 
techniques applicable to use of sound in 
radio, television, cinema, and theatre. 

Comm. 382 Broadcast Station 
Management Problems 2 hours 
Legal aspects. Economic and operational 
factors. Developing local talent. Personnel, 
budgetary, promotional, and other problems. 

Comm. 383 Advertising Writing for 
Radio and TV 2 hours 
Theory and practice in preparing advertising 
copy for local, regional, and national radio 
and TV. Audience evaluation, research, and 
planning campaigns. Construction of 10, 20, 
30, and 60-second ads. 

Comm. 389 Writing for Electronic 
Media 2 hours 

Writing of dramas and documentaries. 
Interviews, research, and study of the 
contribution of dramas and documentaries to 
American cultural patterns. 



Comm. 401 History of American Mass 
Communications 4 hours 
History of newspapers, magazines, books, 
radio and television as well as the related 
areas of public relations and advertising in 
the United States. 

Comm. 402 Public Opinion 4 hours 
The nature and significance of public 
opinion. Includes studies of public opinion 
formation and measurement, the roles of 
news media, advertising, censorship, 
propaganda, political indoctrination, and 
other factors. 

Comm. 403 International 
Communications 2 hours 
Comparative media systems: theory and 
practices in print and electronic media, 
advertising, public relations and journalism 
education in Europe, Asia, Latin America, 
the Middle East and Africa. 

Comm. 404 Advanced Advertising 

2 hours 

Study of principles of writing and layout for 
a sustained campaign. Preparation of a 
campaign for a product and/or service of a 
profit or non-profit institution. 

Comm. 405 Advanced Public Relations 

2 hours 

Study of principles of writing and layout for 
an institutional magazine or newsletter. 
Preparation of a periodical for a profit or 
non-profit institution. 

Comm. 487-488 Independent Study 2 or 
4 hours each 

Comm. 490 Senior Project 2-8 hours 



62 




Computer 
Science 

Aims 

To help students 1) recognize problems 
that can be solved with the aid of a 
computer; 2) write structured programs 
in a reasonable amount of time that 
work correctly, are well documented, 
and readable; 3) determine whether or 
not they have written an efficient and 
well organized program; 4) assess the 
implications of work performed either 
as an individual or as a member of a 
team; 5) understand basic computer 
architectures; 6) understand how the 



process of modern operating systems 
cooperate and compete with each other 
as they perform their functions. To 
prepare students to 7) pursue in-depth 
training in one or more application 
areas of computer science; 8) further 
their education in computer science; 
9) gain employment in some computer 
related capacity. 

Requirements for Field 
of Concentration 

I. Computer Science 201, 202, 250, 330, 
350, 370, 478, and 490 

II. Mathematics 201, 202, 381, and 354. 

CS 100 Computers and Society 2 hours 
The impact of computers and computer 
systems on society is studied. Current topics 
such as the following are covered: the 
impact of computers on employment; 
automation and the labor force; overview of 



computer applications in government, 
medicine, education, etc.; social issues - 
ethics, information banks, privacy and the 
Freedom of Information Act, computer 
abuses; the future - a cashless society and 
computers in the home. 

CS 140-150 Introduction to Programming 

2 hours each 

The following courses provide an 
introduction to computers by programming 
in a high level language on the Prime 
computer. The empahsis is programming 
real-life problems using efficient coding 
techniques. These courses are directed 
towards the student who wants to use the 
computer as a problem-solving tool. 

CS 140 Introduction to Programming 
Using BASIC 2 hours 
This course is directed toward the non- 
science student. 



63 



CS 142 Introduction to Programming 

Using FORTRAN 2 hours 

The programming assignments in this 

course will involve applications to science 

problems. 

CS 143 Introduction to Programming 
Using PL 1 2 hours 
Programming assignments in this course 
will involve applications to science problems. 

CS 144 Introduction to Programming 
Using COBOL 2 hours 
Programming assignments in this course 
will involve applications to business 
problems. 

CS 145 Introduction to Programming 
Using RPG II 2 hours 
Programming assignments in this course 
will involve applications to business 
problems. 

CS 200 Computer Applications in the 
Social Sciences 2 hours 
A study of computer techniques applied to 
social and behavioral sciences. Topics include 
language selections, matrix manipulation, 
statistics (basic), analysis of variance, 
correlations and regression, econometrics, 
and profit analysis packages. 

CS 201 Introduction to Programming 
Using Pascal 4 hours 
This beginning course for computer science 
majors may also be taken by others who 
wish to learn the language. The emphasis is 
on techniques of algorithm development, 
structured programming and debugging 
techniques as they apply to the Pascal 
language. 

CS 202 Introduction to Computer Science 

4 hours 

An introduction to data structures, 
operating systems and computer 
organization. In addition, the programs 
assigned in the course will provide the 
student with advanced features of Pascal. 
Prerequisite: CS 201. 

CS 222 Digital Electronics 4 hours 
An introduction to digital electronics with 
applications in instrumentation and 
computer electronics. Topics include Boolean 
Algebra, basic gates, logic families, 
encoders-decoders, astable/monostable 



64 



multivibrators, flip-flops, counters, readouts, 
shift registers, bi-directional bus structure, 
serial-parallel/parallel-serial data 
conversion, D to A and A to D conversion. 
Prerequisite: Math 103 or equivalent or 
permission of the head of the department. 

CS 250 Introduction to Data Management 

4 hours 

This course provides the foundation for 
applications of data structures and file 
processing techniques. Topics include: 
overview of data base management systems, 
sort, merge algorithms, trees, network, 
random and sequential files, and file I/O. 
Prerequisite: CS 202. 

CS 280 Assembly Language 4 hours 
A study of assembly language programming 
methods. Topics include computer 
organization, assembly process, assembly 
coding, addressing, binary arithmetic, 
storage allocation, character and bit 
manipulation, and debugging techniques. 
Prerequisite: CS 202. 

CS 310 Discrete Structures 4 hours 
Fundamental algebraic, logical, and 
combinational concepts of computer science. 
Topics include graph theory, monoeds and 
finite automata, lattices and Boolean 
algebras. 

CS 330 Computer Organization 4 hours 
Application of Boolean algebra to 
combinational circuit design problems. 
Organization of simplified computer 
components. Adders, arithmetic and logical 
units, memory organization. Architecture 
and physical realization of computer 
systems. Prerequisite: CS 202. 

CS 350 Data Structures 4 hours 
Basic data concepts and their 
representation. Linear lists, strings and 
string processing, algorithms, and arrays. 
Storage allocation and representation of 
arrays. Storage systems and structure, and 
storage allocation and collection. 
Prerequisite: CS 202. 

CS 370 Operating Systems 4 hours 
Batch processing systems. Implementation 
techniques for parallel processing of input/ 
output and interrupt handling. Memory 
management, system accounting, 
interprocess communication and interfaces, 
and deadlocks. Prerequisite: CS 280. 

CS 390 Numerical Analysis 4 hours 
Numerical methods in evaluating integrals 
and differential equations. Techniques in 
finding the roots of polynomials and solving 
systems of linear equations and matrix 
manipulation. Prerequisite: CS U2, U3 or 
201 and Math 201, 202. 



CS 410 Computer Simulation 2 hours 
Simulation methodology including 
generation of random numbers and variates, 
analysis of data generated by simulation 
experiments, and validation of simulation 
models. Introduction to queuing theory. 
Selected simulation applications. 
Prerequisite: CS 202 and Math 281 or 
Math 383. 

CS 420 Systems Analysis 2 hours 
Students are introduced to basic concepts of 
system specification design, system 
implementation, and project management. 
Prerequisite: CS 202. 

CS 430 Micro/Miniprocessors 2 hours 
A study of microprocessors, 
microcomputers, and their applications; 
topics include microprocessor hardware, 
microcomputer organization, software, 
microcomputer programming, interface 
techniques, and trend of development. 
Prerequisite: CS 280. 

CS 440 Data Communication 2 hours 
Data based systems, data communication 
systems. Topics include the role of the data 
base, communication techniques, common 
carrier implications, tariffs, exchanges, 
concentrators, multiplexors, buffering, 
network analysis, cost and design. 
Prerequisite: CS 350. 

CS 450 Data Base Concepts 2 hours 
Introduction to the concept of data base. 
Topics include historic development of data 
bases, data organization and structure, data 
security, recovery, relationship, and 
retrieval, system design, comparison of data 
base approach with traditional file 
organization and access methods. 
Prerequisite: CS 202. 

CS 460 Programming Language 
Structures 4 hours 

This is a course in programming language 
constructs emphasizing the run-time 
behavior of programs. Topics include: formal 
grammars, parsing, information binding, 
data storage, global and local variables and 
parameters, string handling and list 
processing. Prerequisite: CS 202. 

CS 478 Senior Seminar 2 hours 
Current topics in computer science. 

CS 487/8 Independent Study 2 or 4 hours 

CS 490 Senior Project 2-8 hours 




Economics 
& Business 



Aims 

To help students understand how man's 
struggle to provide for his needs and 
wants in a world of limited resources is 
related to all of man's problems: 
personal, social, political, and spiritual; 
to provide knowledge and develop 
proficiency in the application of 
analytical tools to the problems of 
society and business. The courses 
offered serve as preparation for work in 
business, government, law, 
environmental planning, and graduate 
study. 

Requirements for Field 
of Concentration 

A minimum of 36 hours is required. All 
students will take 24 hours in the 
following courses: 200, 241, 246, 301, 
302, 477 and 490. Twelve hours will be 
taken either in three business courses 
(280, 290, 311) or in three accounting 
courses (261, 262, 271). Twelve 
additional hours may be taken to 
complete the maximum of 48 hours that 
are allowed in the Department. Courses 
that are required outside the 
Department include Mathematics 201, 
281, 282 and Computer Science 144. 

Students considering economics as a 
field of concentration should complete 
by the end of the sophomore year: 
Econ. 200, Econ. 241, Math 201, and 
Math 281. 



65 



Students concentrating in Economics 
and Business are expected to attain a 
minimum grade of "C" in all courses in 
the department. If a student receives a 
grade lower than a "C," the student 
must arrange an interview w